History Music Production Part 4c – Large Format Console Studios to Digital Project Studios

David Gilmour.Large Format Console(Meter 2014)
This blog is a continuation of a series. See here (Page 2016) for the previous blog.

The changing field of music production

Twenty-first century music production exists as a fragmented field of practice, in part as a result of increasing decentralisation in the audio and music industry since the 1980’s. A range of factors influenced this decentralization, including the development and adoption of digital recording technologies (Zagorski-Thomas 2005; Leyshon 2009; Huber and Runstein 2013; Izhaki 2013; Théberge 1997; Burgess 2013) and the exponential influence of global communication networks on music production and consumption practices (Spencer 2005; Moran 2011; Kuznetsov and Paulos 2010; Watson 2012).

(TEAC/TASCAM 2015a)

Ever increasing levels of access

Throughout the 1970’s technology continued to advanced with “quality digital recording equipment more widely available” at progressively decreasing cost to the consumer (Wallis 2001, 11). Offering an alternative music production option to the large format console studio continued, all levels of the field actively engaged with the technology. Springsteen released his solo album ‘Nebraska’, made in his bedroom (Springsteen 1984a).
(Springsteen 1982b)
Intended to be a ‘demo’, it was decided the aesthetic of the DIY recording was preferred to the studio-produced album (TEAC/TASCAM 2015b; Burke 2011, 119,188). “Evidence from the 1980’s showed that multi-track cassette based recording technologies spread at a high pace to virtually every nation” (Wallis 2001, 11).
(TEAC/TASCAM 2015c)
Digital Technology – Organs, Synthesisers, Samplers
Towards the end of the 1980’s, low cost digital keyboards and devices were released globally by a number of manufacturers. Digital synthesisers and samplers, triggered by a MIDI controlled keyboard could now play a range of tones, sounds, and emulate instruments. Because a single key could trigger multiple sounds or chords, the technique and skill required to play each of the instruments became virtually redundant. Whilst initially the range of instruments emulated were fairly limited, over time this has grown exponentially, from acoustic – European or world – instruments to synthetic instruments. Such resources allowed music producers to have numerous instrumentation options available to them to integrate into any one of their music productions, as their creativity desired. This has also had of course an affect on the industry in terms of labour, rendering musicians with specialist skills to a certain degree redundant. “Digital sampling and simulation techniques have decreased studio producers’ dependence on hiring the services of live musicians. These trends apply virtually everywhere in the world” (Wallis 2001, 11).
Over the next two decades technology continued to develop at an exponential rate, in terms of general devices, global communication network options and music-making equipment. By the late 1990’s and early 2000’s development in music-making technology had moved into the digital virtual realm.  Several digital audio workstations (such as Cubase, Pro Tools, and then eMagic’s Logic) became available for domestic consumption. A few years following this – as more refined versions became available, virtual instruments (software instruments) and sample libraries (audio libraries for software instruments) from 3rd party providers started to become available. Commercial providers such as Spectrasonics, Native Instruments, Garritan, East West Quantm Leap, or Vienna Symphony came with extremely large and varied databases, at a cost range suitable for novice to serious producers, ready to include into their productions (Gilreath 2010). Miles Hubber and Runstein reinforced the view that the project studio, now with virtual technology “brought about monumental changes in the business of music and professional audio”, with the greatest benefit being a music creator able to “select from a wide range of tools and toys to generate specific sounds – or to get the particular sounds that he or she likes”, without necessarily having that instrument or musician capable of playing that instrument, on hand (Huber and Runstein 2013). Webb confirms the potential of this practice, citing a commercially successful song (having reached the US Music charts) that included a sample from Apple’s household digital audio workstation Garageband: Rihanna’s “Umbrella used one of its drum loops (specifically, Vintage Funk Kit 03) to great effect” (Webb 2007).
(Rhianna 2007)
As composer producer Goyte had made his first two albums using samples from prepared sample libraries exclusively, he decided for his third album he wanted to incorporate a range of unique acoustic instruments into the process. Recording these acoustic instruments – for example, an African thumb piano, music box, an autoharp – over time in his project studio (a barn on his family’s property), using a MacBookPro and a multi-track reel to reel recorder, Goyte then processed the recorded wave samples in a digital audio workstation via a digital sampling instrument. This effectively created a range of new virtual instruments that could be played in ways that the original acoustic instruments could not have – rhythmically, harmonically and even melodically. Goyte commented that “in virtualizing the instrument this way, it would become something unique” (Gotye 2011): effectively a unique instrument that no one else had access to, and had not necessarily heard previously, as a direct result of the digital environment processing. Goyte’s “Making Mirrors” CD was released to critical acclaim, and among many awards worldwide, won a Grammy Award for ‘Best Album’ in 2011.

Making Mirros_Goyte

(Goyte, 2011)
Wallis notes five (5) primary trends in the music and audio industry, three (3) of which are related to the discussion here: one being the “deregulation of existing analogue channels and the growth of the Internet and digital channels as global means for conveying music to businesses and consumers”; another being the “removal of national boundaries in distribution, leading to globalization of media products” (‘distribution’ excluded in this essay); and ‘technology’: “(w)idespread diffusion of new digital technologies for recording and distribution, providing wider access to technology with satisfactory quality at an affordable price” (Wallis 2001,10).
“The rise of more affordable digital recording rigs and easier programming protocols represents a democratisation of technology, making available a process that was once accessible only through the facilities and skills provided by a recording studio” (Leyshon 2009,1309).

Project Studio

Further technological developments gave rise to the increasing opportunity of having a music production setup in the home, based around a personal computer, a sound card, and some form of digital audio workstation to either record or arrange the music. Izhaki noted: “as computers became more affordable and competent, and the hiring of expensive {large format console, commercial} studios was no longer a requisite for multi-tracking and mixing”, a new era of home music creation and production studio iterations known as project studios began to emerge (Izhaki 2013, xiiii). As early as 2005, with a project studio based around an Apple computer with a range of analogue outboard hardware and synthesizers, Stuart Price admitted he “did much of the work for Madonna’s ‘Confessions On A Dancefloor’ album” in his home-based project studio (Doyle 2008). Madonna’s ‘Confessions On A Dancefloor’ album” was a commercial success [1]. As Leyshon highlighted “the recording studio sector is not a particularly profitable or efficient part of the musical economy overall” (Leyshon 2009, 1315), and therefore from an industry perspective, it was positive that alternative options evolved.
Footnotes
[1] In 2005, Stuart Price used his home-based project studio, based around an Apple computer with a range of analogue outboard hardware and synthesizers to produce Madonna’s commercially successful ‘Confessions On A Dancefloor’ album, achieving commercial success reaching the US Music charts (Doyle 2008).
onion-layers
This blog will continue next month History of Music Production Part 4d – Digital Project Studios become for contemporary DIY music-making (Page 2015).
References
Burgess, Richard James. 1997. The art of record production. London: Omnibus Press.
Burke, David. 2011. “Heart of Darkness : Bruce Springsteen’s Nebraska”. London: Cherry Red Books.
Doyle, Tom. 2008. “Stuart Price: producing Seal & Madonna.” Accessed May 2, 2015. https://www.soundonsound.com/sos/feb08/articles/stuart_price.htm.
Gilreath, Paul. 2010. The guide to midi orchestration. 4th ed. Oxford: Focal.
Goyte. 2011. Making Mirrors. Eleven May 5, 2015. Compact Disc.
Holder, Christopher. 2011. “Goyte.” Audio Technology (84): 98.
Huber, David Miles and Robert E Runstein. 2013. Modern recording techniques. 8th ed. Burlington: Focal Press.
Izhaki, Roey. 2013. Mixing audio: concepts, practices and tools. 3rd ed. Oxford: Focal.
Kuznetsov, Stacey and Eric Paulos. 2010. “Rise of the expert amateur: DIY projects, communities, and cultures.” In Proceedings of the 6th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Extending Boundaries, Reykjavik, Iceland, October 16-20, 2010, edited, 295-304. http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1868914&picked=prox: ACM.
Leyshon, Andrew. 2009. “The software slump?: digital music, the democratisation of technology, and the decline of the recording studio sector within the musical economy.” Environment and Planning 41 (6): 1309.
Meter, M . 2014. “For their last-ever album the endless river, Pink Floyd recorded on a boat” Accessed May 20, 2015  http://www.digitaltrends.com/music/pink-floyds-nick-mason-on-the-endless-river
Moran, Ian P. 2011. “Punk: the do-it-yourself subculture.” Social Sciences Journal 10 (1): 13.
Music Group. 2015. “Behringer : our story.” Accessed May 2, 2015. http://www.behringer.com/EN/Our-Story/index.aspx
Onion image courtesy of: Onion Layers Accessed 15th December, 2014
Page, David L. 2015.  History of Music Production Part 4d – Digital Project Studios become for contemporary DIY music-making Accessed 7th June, 2015.
Page, David L. 2016. History of Music Production Part 4b – Experimental practice changes the approach to mainstream music production Accessed 5th March, 2016.
Rhianna and feat Jay-Z. 2007. Umbrella. Def Jam. Compact Disc. Video courtesy of You-Tube. Accessed 21st May, 2015
Spencer, Amy. 2005. DIY: The rise of lo-fi culture: Marion Boyars London.
Springsteen, Bruce. 1982b. Nebraska. image courtesy of Discogs Accessed 21st May, 2015.
Springsteen, Bruce. 1982a. Nebraska. Columbia Records. Vinyl LP.
TEAC/TASCAM. 2015c. TEAC Tascam History. www.teac.com: TEAC Inc. Accessed 24th July, 2015
TEAC/TASCAM. 2015b. TEAC Tascam series: 1979 model 144 Portastudio Manual, edited by TEAC Inc.  www.teac.com: TEAC Inc. Accessed 24th July, 2015
TEAC/TASCAM. 2015a. TEAC/TASCAM 144 Portastudio advertising image courtesy of Museum of Magnetic Sound Recording Accessed 24th July, 2015
Théberge, Paul. 2012. “The end of the world as we know It: the changing role of the studio in the age of the internet.” In The art of record production: an introductory reader for a new academic field, edited by Simon Frith and Simon Zagorski-Thomas, 77-90. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate.
Théberge, Paul. 1997. Any sound you can make: making music/consuming technology. Hanover: University Press of New England.
Wallis, R Dr. 2001. “Best practice cases in the music industry and their relevance for government policies in developing countries.” Paper presented at the United Conference on Trade and Development, Brussels, Belgium, May 14-20, 2001.
Watson, Allan. 2012. “The world according to iTunes: mapping urban networks of music production.” Global Networks 12 (4): 446-466.
Webb, A. 2007. “Is GarageBand top of the pops?” The Guardian Available at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2007/oct/18/news.apple.
Zagorski-Thomas, Simon. 2005. “The US vs the UK sound: meaning in music production in the 1970s.” In The art of record production: an introductory reader for a new academic field, edited by Simon Frith and Simon Zagorski-Thomas, 57-90. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate
– ©David L Page 21/05/2015
– updated ©David L Page 24/07/2015
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

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Doctoral Research Study – Part 1

My journey begins….

~DLP Pro Image Fun 5b small.20141020

(Page 2014a)
This blog is a continuation of a series. See here (Page 2014b) for the previous blog.

Year 2015: 1st Observation

Commencing the doctoral program, I had a relative clear idea of my proposed research study problem. I say relative as, as I have progressed through the many twists and turns of my doctoral program, I have gained clarity regarding just about every aspect of my planned research topic – my practice, my self understanding, the music styles I am attracted to, the reasons I use certain technologies, workflows, just to name a few. In few ways do I consider my self to be the same person – the same practitioner as when I considered embarking on this post-doctoral journey in 2014. This is my journey. Buckle up, as I take you for the ride of my life.
By the end of 2014, I had a clear idea of my research study problem. I made music in two ways:
  1. using physical instruments; and,
  2. using digital virtual technologies
I wanted to know why I felt connected to my music-making when using physical instruments, and why I largely did not feel connected to my music-making when using digital virtual technologies.
I made music via physical instruments. I strummed chords on a guitar or piano, hummed or played a melodic phrase, developed lyrics, and over time a song emerged. I felt connected to the music. I recall getting positive feedback when I shared my acoustic instrument-based songs with an audience. I followed this approach many hundreds of times over several decades.
As technologies developed, I transitioned into music-making using digital virtual technologies. I invested in virtual technologies, trialling a number of virtual music-making applications – digital audio workstations (DAWs). I experimented; I spoke to local pro audio retailers; I experimented some more; I bought instructional books and videos; I studied; I experimented a lot more. Over a number of years however, I found that irrespective of how much time and money I invested into my virtual music-making production practice, I never managed to achieve a similar flow or a similar feeling – a creative high – as I had music-making using physical instruments. There was one instance, a remix project where I felt a connection. That experience gave me hope that my attempts to use virtual technologies to make music I felt connected to, was not going to be in vain.

1st Observation.P1a.renamed

(2017)

End product orientated in my music-making

I acknowledged that I naturally took an end product focus with my music-making. Perhaps due to the relative ease I made music via physical instruments, I had never felt a need to consciously consider my music-making process. Similarly, I viewed my music-making in virtual technologies from an end product perspective. However, because I struggled with the results of my making music via virtual technologies, I had begun to realise that I perhaps needed to reconsider that approach. Perhaps I needed to consciously consider my music-making process?
A question that arose in my mind was:
  • how did I achieve this connection in one form of music-making – using physical instruments, and not another form of music-making – using digital virtual technologies?
onion-layers
This blog series is planned to continue next month with Doctoral Research Study Part 2a (Page 2015). It is intended for this blog series to continue on a regular basis as I progress through my doctoral research project.
References
Onion image courtesy of: Onion Layers Accessed 15th December, 2014
Page, David L. 2017 1st Observation image courtesy of David L Page Created 10th June, 2017
Page, David L. 2015. Doctoral Research Study Part 2a Accessed 15th April, 2015
Page, David L. 2014b. Pre-Doctoral Research Study Part 2 Accessed 30th April, 2017
Page, David L. 2014a image courtesy of David L Page Created 15th December, 2014
– @David L Page 29/01/2015
– David L Page 15/04/2015
– David L Page 10/06/2017
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page

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Pre-Doctoral Research Study – Part 2

A year to remember….

~DLP Pro Image 1.20141020

(Page 2014a)
This blog is a continuation of a series. See here (Page 2014b) for the previous blog.

My life – music-making and education & learning

My journey in music-making commenced a number of decades ago. I made music via physical instruments. I strummed chords on a guitar or piano, hummed or played a melodic phrase, developed lyrics, and over time a song emerged. I felt connected to the music. I recall getting positive feedback when I shared my acoustic instrument-based songs with an audience. I followed this approach several hundred times over several decades, and because of the relative ease these songs came to me, I never had felt a need to consciously consider my music-making process.

Guitar Room.20141004.P2.v3

(Page 2014c)
As technologies developed, I transitioned into music-making using digital virtual technologies. I invested in virtual technologies, trialling a number of virtual music-making applications – digital audio workstations (DAWs). I experimented; I spoke to local pro audio retailers; I experimented some more; I bought instructional books and videos; I studied; I experimented a lot more. Over a number of years however, I found that irrespective of how much time and money I invested into my virtual music-making production practice, I never managed to achieve a similar flow or a similar feeling – a creative high – as I had music-making using physical instruments. My frustration grew using virtual technologies to make music. I enrolled into a practical tertiary course. The course assisted me greatly to develop my theory and practical skills. However, using virtual technologies to make music that I felt connected to, (largely) continued to elude me. There was one instance, a remix project where I felt a connection. That experience gave me hope that my attempts to use virtual technologies to make music I felt connected to, was not going to be in vain. I continued to experiment; I continued to read; I continued to invest; I continue to immerse my self into my virtual music-making production practice. However, I still found I wasn’t achieving a similar flow or a similar feeling – a creative high – using virtual technologies to make music as I had music-making using physical instruments. My frustration was at an all-time high. I had arrived at a juncture in my life where I felt there was now no alternative: my virtual music-making production practice needed an intervention. I needed to put my creative practice using virtual technologies to make music, under scrutiny.
AE Project Studio
(Page 2014d)
In 2013 I applied to a formal academic research program – a professional doctorate program. I was accepted in readiness for commencing in 2014. However, as I neared the 2014 commencement date I accepted my very busy education and training role was not going to be conducive to embarking on such a demanding journey as a doctoral research study, at that time. I therefore immediately applied for a delayed commencement to 2015.

qut-logo

With my delayed commencement formalised, it allowed me to reconsider – to delve down into the many ideas I had for a higher degree research study topic. I developed mindmaps for each of the nineteen (19) potential topic ideas I had, drilling down to see where they took me. I was looking for a topic that allowed me to research as many aspects of interest.
saeq-joint-logo-201309
In 2013/2014 I was practicing creatively, while also lecturing in creative media across the range of audio production modules – audio theory, signal flow, microphones, processing – , and a cross-disciplinary creative media studies module. SAE Institute has been going through exponential development – strategically and structurally.  With a radical change to the focus of their academic programs, new academic staff were being recruited to lead the re-writing of the academic programs. SAE Institute revised focus was now to be project-based learning, promoting learners to engage to more in the learning process, developing assessment tasks that met their interests while realising the required learning outcomes. A major benefit of this approach was the possibility of cross-disciplinary collaborations. As part of the revised focus, all undergraduate programs were now to include studies in the broad discipline of creative media studies and critical thinking. As a Senior Lecturer with broad experience across a number of disciplines, I was assigned to assist on one of the new cross-disciplinary creative media studies module. Late last year the new versions of the undergraduate programs were rolled out.

cooltext170962165748837

However, despite many decades of post-compulsory education experience, I found in talking to the newly recruited academics a lot of their language that largely went over my head.  These new peers were recruited from within the Australian higher education (HE) institutional system. Following completion of their doctorates, most had taught in the specialised HE environment, whilst continuing with their research projects and publishing schedule.
As part of the creative media studies stream at our Institute, learners were now to be immersed in specific creative media lexis and theory, via tasks that guided the aspiring practitioners in the development of them selves as unique and individual creative media identities. They were to learn to critically consider what creative media is for them as practitioners; researching and investigating concepts and areas of the creative media industry they may possibly choose to engage in via their practice. They were to then apply these concepts to develop their unique creative media practice. With a developed sense of themselves, having time to form their world views, they would be guided in their development as aspiring professional practitioners; and as undergraduate academic researchers.

~DLP Pro Image Fun 5b small.20141020

(Page 2014e)
My background, and therefore my approach, was so different. I had developed my multiple forms of practice throughout my life, fundamentally as a craftsperson. I was practical. I liked to be hands-on. I had learnt to become a successful practitioner via the 10,000 hour rule – practice, consider, practice, reconsider, practice, etc. I had a Masters level of education, but I didn’t ever consider my self as a higher education critical thinker. I was a practical person that looked at outcomes. This is what I did for organisations over a number of decades – I improved outcomes. I was analytical for a functional outcome. My brief entrée in an education doctorate program in 1999 reinforced this. I accepted I was not naturally inclined as a scholar. I was a functional, practical practitioner.
When the newly recruited academics began arriving at SAE Institute late last year, speaking a language that largely went over my head, I felt very out of place. By the beginning of this year, I felt very challenged. Challenged on every front: as an educational practitioner, despite my years of experience, knowledge and developed skills; as a music practitioner – again, despite my years of diverse experience, knowledge and developed skills; as a guide and mentor to my learners. A question I asked my self was: how could I guide others when I was struggling with my own learning? I was struggling to both understand and engage in all forms of technology and networking opportunities currently on offer via the internet that were now part of the Institute’s degree program. I recall questioning my place within the higher education environment; I recall questioning my place within the Institute; in fact, I even recall questioning my place within an organisational workplace.
full-2
I have never considered my self smart, but had the experience of knowing what had served me well for most of my life: the principle of 10,000 hours (Page 2004). I decided to engage developing this new knowledge and approaches to contemporary creative media practice in the only way I knew how: hours of research, and hours of trial and error. My motive to engage in this were: I knew I needed to learn in order to model to my learners what their assessment tasks were asking of them; I needed to learn in order to be able to guide my learners as to how to do such tasks effectively and efficiently; I needed to learn in order to model the importance of these approaches in order for them to develop an industry ready practice by the end of their degrees; I needed to learn in order to engage with my new peers – the recently recruited academics; I knew I needed to learn in order to embrace new ways of seeing my practice – to see my creative practice through a different set of eyes. After all, my eyes had only gotten me so far in my creative media career. I was also reminded that my entire point of my engaging in my intended higher degree research was to discover what I had not been able to discover within my own means. Whilst this process was not yet part of my doctoral research study, I recall seeing the situation I found my self in as an opportunity to learn and develop under the tutorage of several published creative media academics. In addition to understanding the value of hard work, I also understood that I had always been an opportunist. I decided to embrace this opportunity of these new found peers, irrespective of whether I could immediately see the point or benefit of how such new knowledge or approach was going to apply to my creative practice. Frankly, I couldn’t. My head chatter throughout the year has been at a critical level. Internally, almost on a daily basis, I have been debating the pros and cons of such knowledge or approach, particularly in regards to the internet-based technology and networking opportunities.
learning-philosophy
Below is a small sample list of journal entries I have written in 2014. These journal entries record my newly acquired knowledge and approach to my music-making practice. These have been written for my eyes only, in order to record my learning, and to frame my position with regard to these topics as a practitioner; particularly for my role as an education and learning practitioner in a creative media higher education institution. You will note: some of the journal entries are more technical in nature – for example, the first four (4) Critical listening journals; some are about developing how, as a practitioner, I interact with society – for example the Media Identity and Curation journal; whilst others are about reflecting on my autobiography, and starting to consider who I was as a music practitioner – for example Beginnings, Life is About the Moment, What Brought Me Here and Genealogy. I concluded this year with the journal entry Reflecting Part 1 (as described in Doctoral Research Study Part 1  (Page 2014b), reflecting upon my life up until now. I was about to embark up a new journey in academia, and needed now to ground my self, and begin to focus on the journey in front of me.
(Page 2017a)
I believe going through this intensive one plus year long process was worthwhile in my development as an education and learning practitioner, in the specific discipline of creative practice. As I acquired this new knowledge, I found I now:
·       felt more broadly informed when I taught related topics at this Institute; and
·       more informed and better able to engage with learners in a range of discussions that I had been able to previously;
·       more equipped to respond quickly to their many questions, irrespective of which discipline they were engaged in;
·       whilst I was not of the belief that I had yet arrived at a clear sense of my identity following this twelve (12) to fifteen (15) months worth of development, I did accept that I now had a positive view of the direction I was heading in. I had a sense that I was on the right path.  I was seeking new knowledge about alternative approaches to what I had previously considered. I had a sense that my nervous excitement, looking to the horizon in front of me, was infectious, and motivating for most of the learners that I engaged with at the Institute.
~DLP Gretsch Profile.20141006.v2
(Page 2014f)
I therefore consider this experience to have been very worthwhile in my development as an education and learning practitioner, in the specific discipline of creative practice. I inherently knew that it also prepared me better for my pending studies in 2015.

Preparing for 2015

Yes, I was excited about my pending studies; nervously excited about the journey into what was largely unknown territory for me – academic research. In some ways, I likened my nervous – apprehensive – excitement to that of the character Bilbo Baggins in the Hobbit (Bros 2014): nervous about embarking on a new adventure – perhaps even somewhat resistant; but trusting I was in need of going on this adventure, for a greater good. It was for me, in many ways, a self-imposed intervention process. I know I needed to look at my creative practice through a different set of eyes. As I have mentioned: the eyes I had previously been looking through had only gotten me so far in my creative media career. I knew I needed to walk down new paths in order to discover new knowledge and approaches that I had not been able to discover within my own means in all my prior decades of practice. I was ready to apply my self to the commitment that others had led me to understand was going to be required. Of the new academic peers I had met, one had taken ten (10) years to attain their doctorate; another seven (7) years; another six (6) years; another five (5) years. I knew undertaking a three (3) full-time doctoral program, whilst working in a very demanding full-time education and learning role, was going to need focus, and lots of hours: probably 10,000 hours.

qut-logo

2017 Update

I commenced the doctoral program in 2015. My formal research journey had begun. On the back of the new acquired knowledge and approach in 2014, I implemented a new blog strategy at the beginning of 2015. This saw me changing my blog site from tumblr.com to wordpress.com. I did this for a number of reasons, but primarily due to:
  • wordpress.com is what we were guiding our students to create as their primary creative practice blog site;
  • functionality of the wordpress.com site, including the use-friendly nature of the interface, the editing features, and the ability to publish multi-media within the one entry.
wordpress-site-20160129
(Page 2017b)
These journal entries were published retrospectively in wordpress.com as blog posts as soon as I opened that site. The small sample of blogs I currently have listed on my wordpres.com site under the menu category DCI Phase 0 – Starting Point (Page 2017c) – are representative of some of this new knowledge and approach I acquired and developed during this period. These journals/blogs were completed prior to my official commencement of my doctoral studies, the research study I was choosing to embark on to hopefully find answers to my long-term queries regarding my music practice: 10,000 words book-ending the beginning of my research study.

images

 (Terry-Toons Comics 1945-1951)
This blog series is planned to continue next month with A creative artists need (Page 2015). It is intended for this blog series to continue on a regular basis as I progress through my doctoral research project.
References
Ericsson, K.A., Krampe, R.T. and Tesch-Römer, C., 1993. The role of deliberate practice in the acquisition of expert performance. Psychological review100(3), p.363.
Learning Philosophy image courtesy of:  Learning Accessed 17th December, 2014
Onion image courtesy of: Onion Layers Accessed 17th December, 2014
Page, David L. 2017a. DLP Blog Category Topics Accessed 30th April, 2017
Page, David L. 2017b. David L Page wordpress.com site Accessed 30th April, 2017
Page, David L. 2017c. DCI Phase 0 Starting Point Accessed 30th April, 2017
Page, David L. 2015. A Creative Artist’s Need – Gratitude Accessed 30th April, 2017
Page, David L. 2014a image courtesy of David L Page Linked-In site  Accessed 17th December, 2014
Page, David L. 2014b. Pre-Doctoral Research Study – Part 1 Accessed 30th April, 2017
Page, David L. 2014c image courtesy of David L Page My Space site  Accessed 17th December, 2014
Page, David L. 2014d. David L Page Pinterest site Accessed 17th December, 2014
Page, David L. 2014e image courtesy of David L Page You-tube site  Accessed 17th December, 2014
Page, David L. 2014f image courtesy of David L Page About.me site  Accessed 17th December, 2014
Page, David 2004. Educational Philosophy Part 1 Accessed 17th December, 2014
Pulsating image courtesy of:  Image Accessed 17th December, 2014
QUT image courtesy of: QUT Accessed 17th December, 2014
SAE QANTM image courtesy of: SAE QANTM Creative Media Institute Accessed 17th December, 2014
Terry-Toons Comics. 1945-1951. Mighty Mouse in Mighty Mouse #38-85  Accessed 8th March, 2014.
– @David L Page 17/12/2014
– updated @David L Page 30/04/2017
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

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Pre-Doctoral Research Study – Part 1

Preparing for my research study

~DLP Pro Image Fun 5b small.20141020

 (Page 2014a)

Learning and development

Just being me……

I have never considered my self smart. My schooling test results were mainly above-average, but I worked consistently, and often for long hours in order to achieve these. I recall I often looked to those who got the top grades – those who appeared to do it effortlessly – and wondered what they had inside their heads that I didn’t. My mother was strict, and prohibited me from going out to play until I had done my chores, and homework. I therefore sat there, and continued to toil, in order to be able to get outside. It brought both resentment (for being denied play time) and conviction (to get my chores or home tasks completed, in order to get outside to enjoy playtime). Possibly this was imposed as a result of other behaviour I exhibited in the years prior, but I don’t recall what or when this, may have been.
I do however recall I always seemed to get into trouble with my parents, relatives and teachers, just for being me.  Mmmmm……… Ok, I was probably mischievous. Thinking back, there was the time I talked my neighbour’s sister into going with me to the local gas station to buy a packet of cigarettes. I recall I was seven (7) years old, and she was possibly four (4) years old at best. What was the fuss? No one was harmed – just a simple afternoon walk. It was of no consequence to anybody really…… well, except the girl’s parents. When they eventually found out, they in turn told my parents. Mmmm…. banished to my room with limited dinner, no playing and no talking for what seemed like a month.
I perhaps had a limited filter between my thoughts and my mouth. I thought, I spoke, I acted.
images
 (Terry-Toons Comics 1945-1951)
My mother was an active P+C member in my schools, and therefore she knew the teachers, and most likely, the principal. One of my school principals was a very social person. He would hang in the school grounds and talk to the students at break times. He was large – a big guy – with snow white hair, and a large jovial face. Much like I imagined Santa Claus would look like in an everyday suit. He was well over weight. I recall – when I was about six (6) years old – during a playground catch up sharing with him what my brother and sister called him at home – Fatty Arbuckle.  Several days later, I recall coming home to be greeted by my mother…. mmmm….I was  banished to my room with limited dinner, no playing and no talking for what seemed like a month. She had heard through the Principal at a P+C meeting what I had shared with him. I hadn’t told him to be malicious – I just thought it was funny, and wanted to share it with him. I was sure he would enjoy it. Mmmmm…. note to self.

Left-handed

I was left-handed. Up until I was about eight (8) years old, the teachers at my first primary school made me sit on my left-hand during class times, to (as they said) ‘get it (my left-handedness) out of my system’. I remember when I moved up to the next class level at another school, being told to sit on my left-hand was no longer a focus of the teacher. I recall wondering whether this ceasing to focus on my left-handedness being an issue at the new school was due to the teacher, the school’s approach, or in fact it was just the end of an era of left-handedness being considered wrong.

Always smiling

I recall I was naturally happy – smiling, and this too caused issues. Again with parents, relatives, and teachers – wondering with such a smile on my face, what I was up to. I recall a teacher talking sternly to our class one day (we had possibly been talking and acting up while waiting to be let into our home room after a lunch break). All students were standing, ready to be seated by our teacher prior to class, as she dressed us down for our noisy behaviour in the corridor. I was apparently standing there, during this dressing down, with a smile on my face. “What are you smiling at?” she barked. “I, I , I am happy?” I responded meekly. The class laughed, though I am unsure of whether they were laughing with me, or perhaps laughing at me?
DLP_Age 4_Cropped_Fade.P2
 (Page 2016)
I was average at individual sport, but recognised early on, the advantage of team sports. I learnt that within a team I could excel. I became a year house captain within my school; and played in team sports on Saturday mornings, with a team that was consistently in the top two teams in the district over an 8 year period.

Practical approach

I was always a practical person, wanting to do things with my hands, but also realised I wanted to know how it worked, and how I could use it for other applications. I pulled apart all kinds of gadgets, toys, billy carts, wheel-barrows; antique clocks, motor mowers, motorbikes, and cars. I admit I didn’t like the follow up process – the putting back together of these things. I had learnt in pulling them apart what I needed to know – how it worked, so that I could then consider other applications. I made (make believe) sports cars, space ships, and moon craft with the many parts I had before me – all in the backyard. Once I had created my make believe craft, I would then move onto the next thing. Yes, I got bored quickly.

Industry beckoning me

I quit school because I was bored, preferring to get out start working with adults. I started engineering at a trade level, but quickly realised, as soon as I had worked out the how, I was again ready to move on. I then applied to enter tertiary study, fumbling my way through a bachelor’s degree without having completed the final two years of high school. I used the time to explore all manner of things – philosophy, re-engage with my music-making, experiencing social events, bands, pubs, live gigs, and girls. I struggled to find my place in that institution studying a business degree, but looking through many photos of that era, I recall I had a lot of fun trying. Eventually, when I ended up graduating, I immediately headed overseas to explore the world. I arrived in Asia to an opportunity in corporate education and training. I played in a number of cross-cultural band, performing at many cultural festivals. As a foreign educator and trainer, I was also volunteered to make addresses at significant events in the local region, such as at the openings of bridges and at local government and community meetings. I gained invaluable experience and skills, that had I stayed in my native Australia, i would not have had similar opportunities. Several years passed and I returned home. I considered my options, and chose to formalise my experience gained in education and training with qualifications, in order to be able to continue my education and learning practice in Australia.
japan_grunge_flag

Corporate experience

After some ten (10) years of practice, the next level of formal qualifications beckoned. I re-entered university to complete my masters degree. At its conclusion, it was suggested I progress onto a doctorate in that discipline. However, after only a short time of study, I was tempted back into industry. The choice was easy for me to make – to apply in real life my proposed thesis topic, rather than remaining at university and developing the thesis statement theoretically.
I commenced managing a local site of a globally-run business, and within a few years had surpassed all projected targets. I progressed into a number of global leadership roles. These required much local and international travel attending conferences, and leading staff training and professional development sessions across a number of content areas: organisational and operational management (including finance, HR, business development, systems and processes), and my developing expertise -corporate culture. Within a global business with over 30 sites around the globe, there was always a need for re-aligning sites to the organisational needs. My demonstrated expertise in change management provided an opportunity to move overseas permanently, heading a region that was now in financial difficulty, and facing deregulation by the countries’ governing body. Over a three year period, I liaised closely with government, governing bodies, financial institutions and head office to return the regional multi-site entity to full accreditation and profitability.  Unfortunately, just a few months after this GFC hit the global economy and over a twelve month period, the corporate entity – located in Japan – went into receivership. Fortunately, the region I had led in its development was one of the few secure entities to survive the GFC, and was able to be on-sold. My wife and I returned home to Australia, to enter our next phase.

Formal Studies

As my career had developed into governance roles, I formalised this experience with a qualification upon returning home. As a number of education, training and consulttancy opportunities arose, I arrived into the industry of my main passion, creative arts. Firstly, an education and training role in music and sound; followed by governance roles in film and arts business development. Having embarked on a doctorate previously, and not choosing to continue it, I had a feeling of incompleteness. In addition, having only formally studied my area of passion – music and sound – at an entry tertiary level, and still having so many unanswered questions, I decided to enquire what possible programs I could consider. In talking to several industry contacts, I was quickly referred to the Head of Department at one of Queensland’s leading universities, and over the course of a fifteen (15) minute conversation, a Doctorate of Creative Industries was suggested. I proposed a topic and after some months I received confirmation of my acceptance.

Symbol of my learning and development

Over the past number of years, I have used the image of the purple onion to represent my approach to life. I am committed to learning – something I have done over most of my life – looking under the many layers of my practice or self in order to gain more insight into life and practice. I still do not consider my self smart, but experienced. I believe in Ericsson’s 10,000 hours  (Ericsson in Page 2004), and believe much of my life’s success is based on constant and continued work, rather than any presence of intelligence. I therefore embark on my doctoral pilot study journey with this in mind, and trust that this approach will be sufficient to have me realise the required milestones, at the level of rigour expected of Australian tertiary studies.

onion-layers

My journey begins….
This blog series is planned to continue next month with Pre-Doctoral Research Study – Part 2 (Page 2014b). It is intended for this blog series to continue on a regular basis as I progress through my doctoral research project.
References
Ericsson, K.A., Krampe, R.T. and Tesch-Römer, C., 1993. The role of deliberate practice in the acquisition of expert performance. Psychological review100(3), p.363.
Learning Philosophy image courtesy of:  Learning  Accessed 15th October 2013
Page, David L. 2016 image courtesy of: Slideshare  Accessed 30th April, 2017
Page, David L. 2014b. Pre-Doctoral Research Study – Part 2 Accessed 30th April, 2017
Page, David L. 2014a image courtesy of David L Page Created 15th December, 2014
Page, David L. 2004. Educational Philosophy Part 1 Accessed 15th December, 2014
Japan Grunge Flag Image courtesy of:  Japan Flag  Accessed 15th December, 2014.
Onion image courtesy of: Onion Layers Accessed 15th December, 2014
Terry-Toons Comics. 1945-1951. Mighty Mouse in Mighty Mouse #38-85  Accessed 15th December, 2014.
– @David L Page 16/12/2014
– updated @David L Page 30/04/2017
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

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Media Identity & Curation Part 2

My Gravatar.20160220.P2.png
As revealed in my blog last month, Media Identity & Curation Part 1, I hold a very broad view of creative practice. My interests, activities and roles are diverse. I love life and the aesthetic of life. Whether it is a visual, auditory, kinaesthetic, gustatory or olfactory-based creations, I embrace them all. As my personal motto describes, my life is full: “Life is about the moment……. experiencing the moment…” (Page 2014). Whilst most days I prioritise my primary interest of music practice, I take every opportunity to immerse myself proactively in as many sensory-based practices as I can on a daily basis. I seek out people to engage and learn from – practitioners who know more of a discipline area than I do – to develop my knowledge, understanding and appreciation of that particular practice.

My Media Strategy

As described last month, I use social media to support my diverse interests and practice. The sites I choose and the practice I engage through each site such as blogging and curating of text, video and audio resources relate to my broad creative practice. My media strategy is very deliberate. The media sites must connect the diversity of my interests and practice. The media sites must facilitate the expression of my self, revealing more understanding of my self in the process, and making connections with others of similar interests or practice to share experience, knowledge, understanding and appreciation of a particular practice.
 In this aspect of my creative practice, new facets of myself and in turn, new distinctions regarding my practice are revealed – to my self, and to others. Through my media strategy the dynamic relationship between my self, my practice and my audience is demonstrated –  my self informing my practice, my practice informing my self and my audience, which in turn reinforces and consolidates my identity at any point in time.
Representative of my diverse interests and practice, the social media sites I use include: about.me, gravatar.com, wordpress.com, tumblr.com, twitter.com, linked-in.com, myspace.com, facebook.com, pinterest.com, you-tube.com, soundcloud.com, instagram.com, lastfm.com, slideshare.com, googlescholar.com, academia.com and google.com.
[Note: I also write, perform and produce under pseudonyms. I consider each pseudonym an alternative identity.  I am conscious these specific practice identities also inform my creative practice as defined in this blog, and will no doubt reveal themselves for interrogation, analysis and reflection during my  higher degree research study. But for the purpose of this blog, I will disregard the media I use to represent those identities. 
In this blog I choose one site that I proactively use to support my creative practice, and show how I have structured the curation of the content. The site is: Pinterest.com.

Pinterest [Pinterest.com/David L Page]

Pinterest Board Categories.20160306.P1b
Pinterest uses a board system for the user to categorise their interests. The boards I have created are intended to reflect the diversity of my interests, activities and roles. The following boards in some form represent my interests in visual, auditory, kinaesthetic, gustatory and olfactory-based phenomena or creations – natural or constructed. Please note that each the Boards within my Pinterest site, and each pin is linked to a relevant playlist within my You-Tube Channel [You-Tube/David L Page] .
  • *Social Media Sites: connections to David L Page’s Social Media Sites, all linked for ease of access.
  • Academic Creative Media – Texts: All ‘academic creative media texts’ related: Research Methodology, Creativity Theory, Music Theory, Genre Studies, Cultural Theory, Compositional Theory, Arrangement Theory, Songwriting Studies, Audio Theory – Digital versus Analogue, Production Theory – Recording, Mixing, Mastering, Post-Production, Anecdotal, etc. Intended audience are undergraduate and post-graduate Creative Media students
  • Academic Creative Media – JournalsAll ‘academic creative media journals’ related: Research Methodology, Creativity Theory, Music Theory, Genre Studies, Cultural Theory, Compositional Theory, Arrangement Theory, Songwriting Studies, Audio Theory – Digital versus Analogue, Production Theory – Recording, Mixing, Mastering, Post-Production, Anecdotal, etc. Intended audience are undergraduate and post-graduate Creative Media students
  • ArtAll things ‘visual art’ related: paintings, posters, drawings, lithographs, sculpture, pottery; and the people that do it……
  • Audio – EquipmentAll things ‘audio equipment’ related: any audio equipment including hardware, software, and peripheral equipment and devices……
  • Audio – RecordingAll things ‘audio recording’ related in a studio: microphones, microphone placement, microphone technique and any recording related technique or matter ……
  • Audio – TheoryAll things ‘Audio Theory’ related: sound waves, frequencies, amplitude, decibels, harmonics, acoustics, electronics……
  • Audio – Post ProductionAll things ‘Audio Post-Production’ related: ADR, Foley, Mixing, Mastering
  • Audio – Live SoundAll things ‘audio recording’ related in live sound: sound reinforcement, stage setup, front of house, monitoring side of stage, microphones, microphone placement, microphone technique and any live sound related technique or matter ……
  • Audio – TextsAll ‘audio texts’ related: Theory, Recording, Mixing, Mastering, Post-Production, Anecdotal or Process, etc. Intended audience are Audio Production practitioners & students

Pinterest Board Categories.20160306.P2b.png

  • CelestialAll things celestial – space and movement in places other than on Planet Earth………
  • ComedyAll things ‘comedy’ related: people or events…
  • Community MusicCommunity MusicAll things ‘community music’ related: making music accessible to all … for all to enjoy, to learn, to develop, to become, to overcome, ‘holistic therapy’ …..To guide, to mentor, to inspire, to educe……
  • Culture: Language, Dress, Values, Beliefs, Spirituality, Rituals, Traditions, Music, Food, LifestyleAll things ‘culture’ related: Language, Dress, Values, Beliefs, Spiritual Beliefs, Rituals, Traditions … (I have chosen to exclude Music and Food & Lifestyle here, making other ‘Pinterest boards’ dedicated to those..)…
  • EnvironmentAll things ‘environment’ related: continents, nature – flora, fauna, environmental or historical monuments….
  • Fast, Fun ThingsAll things related to going fast, being physically active, using exhilarating modes of transport……
  • Great ImagesAll things ‘photography and imagery’ related …….. [ In addition to my other Pinterest boards, for more great photos/images, see http://about.me/dpgold/collections/greatpic%5D
  • Lifestyle, Food & WineAll things ‘living’ related: enjoying, relaxing, breathing, exercising, eating and drinking…..
  • Marketing & PromotionAll things ‘marketing’ related: branding, strategic planning, product analysis, market analysis, proactive plan development, advertising via a range of mediums, print versus social media, promotion ………
  • MoviesAll things ‘film’ related: movies, documentaries, short film, sit-com, or animation; and the people that act or direct these …….
  • PerformanceAll things ‘performance’ related: any creative expression, irrespective of the art form…. performance or performer….
  • Performance – EquipmentAll things ‘performance equipment’ related: any performance-related equipment including hardware, software, and peripheral equipment and devices. ‘Instruments’, no mater their country or nationality origin, or whether their medium is ‘organic’, ‘electronic’ or ‘virtual’…
  • Production & ProducersAll things ‘Producers’ and the ‘Production’ of recorded mediums related: including the Recording and Mixing process and the Producers & Engineers dedicated to this….
  • The ‘Soft Skills’: Communication, Education, Learning, Development & ChangeAll things ‘communication’ related: all that is associated to the act of communicating, engaging, discussion, expressing, projecting, reflecting, learning, developing self image and ‘voice’, changing & developing views and perceptions, goal setting, time management, negotiation, conflict resolution, educing, teaching, training, guiding, or scaffolding: either of yourself or others, into something more than who you were, to become who you really are …….
  • Storytelling: Poetry, Prose, Songwriting & CompositionAll things ‘contemporary storytelling’ related: poetry, prose, & poets, songwriting & songwriters, raps & rappers, composition & composers, arrangements & arrangers….. examples, methods & people who practice the many and varied mediums of ‘contemporary storytelling’…
I have also created three Boards very specific to one particular audience, that of my Trimester One and Trimester Two students within the Bachelor of Audio degree I Lecture in at SAE Institute. I have used these specific Boards to engage in , and take a proactive interest in researching within the particular unit and subject content. These are:
I also joined one Pinterest Group Board which I thought was aligned to my media strategy:
  • MUSICIANS UNITED: ALL THINGS MUSIC:  Beautiful Instruments, Recording Studios, Concerts, Musical Heroes, Quotes, Tips and Tricks, and anything that makes musicians SMILE. :
I am proactive in curating resources (pinning)  and sharing these within my immediate music practice audience, predominantly my Higher Education undergraduate creative media students.I have yet to proactively engage in the wider global market place within Pinterest due to my other commitments and priorities.  I currently have  1,569 Pinterest followers, and I am following 2, 389 Pinterest users.
As a creative practitioner I use social media to support my diverse interests and practice, and Pinterest is an example of this strategy. Within Pinterest, I curate text, video and audio resources that relate to my broad creative practice. I have very deliberately used this media site to connect the diversity of my interests and practice, in concept and functionally via direct links to my other media sites. As a result, this media site facilitates an expression of my self, revealing more understanding of my self in the process, and making connections with others of similar interests or practice to share experience, knowledge, understanding and appreciation of a particular practice.
 In this aspect of my creative practice, new facets of myself and in turn, new distinctions regarding my practice are revealed – to my self, and to others. Through this particular media strategy the dynamic relationship between my self, my practice and my audience is demonstrated –  my self informing my practice, my practice informing my self and my audience, which in turn reinforces and consolidates my identity at any point in time.
References
Page, David L. 2014. Life is About the Moment 20/09/2014 Tumblr and WordPress.com blog. Accessed 13th November, 2014
Page, David L. 2014. Media  Identity & Curation Part 1  18/10/2014  WordPress.com blog. Accessed 13th November, 2014
Page, David L. 2014. David L Page’s Pinterest.com site  Accessed 13th November, 2014
Page, David L. 2014. David L Page’s You-Tube Channel  Accessed 13th November, 2014
– ©David L Page 14/11/2014
– updated ©David L Page 01/03/2015
– updated ©David L Page 15/15/2016
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

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Media Identity & Curation Part 1

My Gravatar.20160220.P2.png
This blog is a continuation of a series. See here for the previous blog.

A creative practitioner

As a creative practitioner I am conscious of the dynamic nature of creative endeavours. I am aware of the relationship between my self and my practice: my self informs my practice, and in turn, my practice informs my self and my identity.  This process enables the constant revealing of new facets of myself, and in turn, new distinctions regarding my practice.
In this blog I reflect on my use of social media in support of my practice:  the sites I choose, the images I select to represent my identity in those particular forums, and the practice I engage through each site such as blogging and curating of text, video and audio resources related to my broad practice. I embrace and proactively engage in the dynamic process of being a creative practitioner.

My Practice

As a contemporary music practitioner, my roles and activities are diverse. I practice music and creative writing on a daily basis for my creative projects, undertaking a higher degree research study, lecturing in a higher education undergraduate degree, mentoring a number of aspiring musicians, and actively engaging in a number of forms of research practice across multi-disciplines.
Note: I also write, perform and produce under pseudonyms. I consider each pseudonym an alternative identity.  I am conscious these specific practice identities also inform my music practice as defined in this blog, and will no doubt reveal themselves for interrogation, analysis and reflection during my  higher degree research study. But for the purpose of this blog, I will disregard the media I use to represent those identities. 

My Media Needs

What I require from my media is: to have multiple mediums that allow me to curate my interests and artefacts generated by my diverse practice, have a coherent image and brand that connects these multiple mediums, with means to engage and communicate with my potential audience.  Representative of my diverse practice, I use a wide range of social media sites including: about.me, gravatar.com, wordpress.com, tumblr.com, twitter.com, linked-in.com, myspace.com, facebook.com, pinterest.com, you-tube.com, soundcloud.com, lastfm.com, slideshare.com, googlescholar.com, academia.com and google.com to name a few. Each of these social media sites facilitate a specific aspect of my contemporary music practice.

David L Page logo.20141231.v2_resize4

My Media Identity

I use the above image as my contemporary music practice signature image, and as my profile image on my about.me site [about.me/David L Page]. As you may immediately notice in this image, I use the backdrop image of water. Water represents three things to me: firstly, the functional side of water-related activities such as swimming for health, fitness and feeling good; secondly, my life partner and I share a love for water-based activities, and since our initial meeting this love has always governed our lifestyle. [The original photo image was taken by  my life partner in our swimming pool] ; and thirdly, as expressed in my blog last month “Life is About the Moment”, water represents to me the fluidity of life:
“Life is about the moment ….. all things fluid……. experiencing the moment… listening, observing, interacting, laughing, loving, enJOYing, soaking the moment in, digesting it, considering it, reflecting …. expressing ones’ being, streaming ones’ consciousness. While in the moment, everything appears suspended – almost in slow motion – and yet is still very much part of life and moving somewhere…” (Page 2014).

~Pool_HP.v2.Web.jpg

I use this image as my banner image on my WordPress account [wordPress.com/David L Page] and my You-Tube Channel [You-tube.com/David L Page]. Blogging and curating resources such as text, video and audio resources related to my broad practice enables me to engage proactively and express the diversity of my music practice. As an educator and mentor I have the opportunity to model practice –  functional, conceptual and philosophical – across a diverse range of practice that collectively makes up my creative practice, and in particular, my music practice. I believe that such an opportunity encapsulates the idea of fluidity as I described above, and therefore it is fitting for me to have the image of water as the central theme of my branding, and present on my sites.  My likely audience is aspiring creative practitioners, novice reflective practitioners and researchers. Perhaps I trust that the extensive use of media will also allow the ocean of knowledge to flow to a far greater audience, far broader than to those who I currently interact with on a physical basis in my current world.
The other images within the above signature image include what I consider key different perspectives of my self. Whilst all taken at the same photo shoot, each one reveals a different dimension of my self as creative music practitioner.
The first image reveals me in a quiet reflective state. At the time of the photo, I was within my own thoughts, and not aware I was about to be photographed. To offset the melancholy of the moment, a state that is quite often interpreted by non-creative practitioners as my serious side, I chose to use a very colourful backdrop in my attempt to directly connect such melancholic moment to my creative practitioner self. I am hoping this image reinforces my acceptance of the necessity and value of such introspection and reflection as a music practitioner engaging in original and authentic creative practice. I use this image as my profile image on my Google Scholar account [Google scholar/David L Page] and my You-Tube Channel [You-tube.com/David L Page].

~DLP Pro Image Fun 5b small.20141020.jpg

The image in the centre reveals me in what I would hope is my everyday public face: happy, smiling, and approachable; relaxed, but professional. I chose this image as it places me with a guitar. Guitars in general are an integral part of how I see my self. Playing guitar represents a tool to express my self, a tool to lose my self in the moment, a tool that I learnt to reveal my creative being to my self, and then in and to the public. Guitar also represents a form of therapy to me, as I believe the action of my guitar-based music practice has allowed me to achieve and maintain a healthy balance in life – physically land spiritually. For this I am most grateful for the opportunity of my guitar-based music practice.
Guitar Room.20141004.P2.v3
More specifically, this particular guitar is one of my favourite guitars, my Gretsch 6120. This particular instrument represents several things in my life. I am left-handed, and given the scarcity of left-handed guitars relative to right-handed guitars, I have had to travel the world to find a selection of guitars that resonated with my self. I found this Gretsch 6120 in Houston Texas, at one of the few exclusive left-handed guitar shops, and after playing approximately sixty different left-handed guitar over three days, this guitar spoke to me.
I chose to include this particular guitar for two reasons: a) this particular Gretsch is a hollow body guitar, originally used by country-based artists such as Chet Atkins. In my mind, this image pays homage to those country artists who were respectful and gentlemanly, going about their business of music practice without unnecessary fanfare or the need for glamour. Chet Atkins and Les Paul directly influenced the art of session playing, recording and production techniques that remain to this day as significant. Their music practice and dedication to their craft and art of music practice directly influenced my love for music in general, and continues to influence my music practice;
and b) playing rock n’ soul style music live through guitar amplifiers is an experience that I have not yet found in any other form of practice or activity in life. Playing this type of guitar, a wide body hollow body guitar with large amounts of air inside the guitar, electrified through a guitar amplifier at loud volumes requires specific skill and control to avoid the guitar, amplifier, and the PA system from creating levels of extreme feedback that are unusable in terms of the the musical and sonic integrity of the music and the composition, or dangerous for the venues PA system or listener’s health (damage to their ears).  To realise the warmth of tone with high volume, achieving acceptable levels of signal distortion and degeneration, without going over the edge of total sonic destruction is a well practiced skill. It requires balanced amounts of reckless abandon and greatly intentioned control in order to achieve signal that is both musically and sonically complementary to the composition and the performance. Such practice represents to me: fun; creativity; rebellion; a heightened sense of energy, life and positivity; skill and expertise; and mostly joy when I am in that state of music practice. I use this image as my profile image on my Twitter account [Twitter/David L Page].
~DLP Gretsch Profile.20141006.v2.jpg
The third image is my professional image. This image represents to me my professional image. Having spent a large part of my career in business development, management and Corporate Governance , I chose the more formal backdrop that could be found on a building found in the financial district of a city. However to contrast this backdrop given my current field of practice is within  the Creative Industries, a profile shot that was professional but relaxed, and expressing gratitude and happiness was selected. At the time of this particular photo being taken I was actually thinking about how grateful I was for the abundance of opportunities and successes I have had in my life. I use this image as my profile image on my Linked-In account [Linked-In/David L Page]
~DLP Pro Image 1.20141020.jpg
As a creative practitioner I immerse myself proactively in all practice-related endeavours. I use social media in support of my practice.The sites I choose, the images I select to represent my identity in those particular forums, and the practice I engage through each site such as blogging and curating of text, video and audio resources related to my broad practice are all very deliberate actions, and must work together to reinforce the coherent image and brand that connects these multiple mediums. In this aspect of my music practice, new facets of myself and in turn, new distinctions regarding my practice are revealed. In this way the dynamic relationship between my self and my practice is demonstrated –  my self informing my practice, and in turn, my practice informing my self and my identity.
This blog series is planned to continue with Media Identity & Curation Part 2  (Page 2014b). It is intended for this blog series to continue on a regular basis as I progress through my doctoral research project.
References
Chet Atkins Official Website. 2014 http://www.misterguitar.us Accessed 16th October, 2014
Les Paul Biography. 2009. http://www.biography.com/people/les-paul-9435046  Accessed 16th October, 2014
Page, David L. 2014 David L Page’s About.me site Accessed 16th October, 2014
Page, David L. 2014. David L Page’s Google Scholar site  Accessed 16th October, 2014
Page, David L. 2014. Life is About the Moment 20/09/2014 Tumblr and WordPress.com blog. Accessed 16th October, 2014
David L Page’s Linked-In site: David L Page’s Linked-In site    Accessed 16th October, 2014
Page, David L. 2014. Media  Identity & Curation Part 2  18/10/2014  WordPress.com blog. Accessed 13th November, 2014
Page, David L. 2014. David L Page’s Pinterest.com site  Accessed 16th October, 2014
Page, David L. 2014. David L Page’s Twitter site  Accessed 16th October, 2014
Page, David L. 2014. Music Practitioner Part 2 Accessed 16th October, 2014
Page, David L. 2014 David L Page’s WordPress site  Accessed 16th October, 2014
Page, David L. 2014. David L Page’s You-Tube Channel  Accessed 16th October, 2014
– ©David L Page 18/10/2014
– updated ©David L Page 15/11/2014
– updated ©David L Page 15/05/2016
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

Music Practitioner Part 2 – What Brought Me Here #5

The Real Thing stamp - Image                                       (Australia Post stamp 1998)
This blog is a continuation of a series. See here for the previous blog.

A significant influence

A song that had a significant influence on my music practice in my formative years was “The Real Thing” written by Johnny Young, performed by Russell Morris, produced by Ian ‘Molly’ Meldrum (Max TV 2014).
The Real Thing
The song was originally released in 1969 – an era of exponential technological development, including space travel, exploration (the first man walking on the moon), global conflict (the Vietnam war), global uprising (protests against the US involvement in this war), the social and cultural movement of peace, love and the resultant drug taking (largely marijuana and LSD), and music including folk, jazz, R&B, pop, rock, progressive rock and psychedelic rock genres (to name a few).
Russell Morris was an acoustic pop performer with some popular music chart success, playing either 6 string or 12 string guitars. Whilst he did play as a solo performer, a band often supported Morris (Wikipedia 2014). This song uses the basis of acoustic music (acoustic guitars, bass, drums) with layers of keys, processing applied and sampled sounds (such as news recordings, laughter, choral bomb sirens and it concludes with a bomb blast) over the top. Despite this song had clear acoustic influence, performed by someone who was usually an acoustic artist I recall the main aspects that caught my attention with this song was:
  • This song was clearly of psychedelic character, with numerous technical processes applied
  • The most obvious technical characteristic are the full use of the stereo field, with liberal use of panning; and
  • the extreme use of time-domain processing, from the opening section of the song, applied to both the music and the vocal line……including large amounts of reverb, delay, and flanging to name a few. Additionally, because of the large amount of processing, the main sonic quality was quite distorted in places, particular in the later half of the song
  • The use of these, especially the extent and the amount of processing helped create and place the listener in an out of world or drug-induced type state.
  • The duration of the song is more than double the length of the usual pop song of the day at 6 mins 22 seconds in length. [However, there was also a 3 min 46 second version played on radio]
  • the simplistic nature of the lyric, being only a few lines repeated throughout the whole song. I recall how a song could take you on a journey, telling a story, with limited lyrics, and yet still had an emotional impact of me
  • whilst the song represented a vehicle that transported me to another world sonically & aurally, I recall the intrigue of how this song incorporated a political statement, with the music video referenced against a backdrop of Vietnam war film footage. This introduced to me the multiple intentions and messages a song could express, appealing to a range of listeners with different values and beliefs of what the cultural production actually meant to them.
It has been reported that the likes of US Producer Phil Spector, and his wall of sound style of productions influenced Ian Meldrum (Wall of Sound 2014). I am unsure if Meldrum specifically set out to reproduce recording and production techniques that Spector used to achieve the wall of sound style; or whether Meldrum had the intent to create a song with a similar type of sonic complexity and variety of recording, overdubbing and processing techniques that took the listener on a sonic experience and voyage. Irrespective of Meldrum’s intent, I was certainly taken on, and continue to be taken on a sonic experience and voyage each time I listen to this song. As I return to this song after several decades of not listening to it in depth, and analyzing it as an example for my undergraduate degree students, I am again entertained and impressed by the multiple textual layers that Meldrum’s production team achieved via the recording, overdubbing and processing techniques applied. I further realize the dynamics of the song vary throughout, with instrumentation, sampling, amplitude, frequency, stereo field and processing constantly changing, quite often within a particular section of a song. This variety and complexity for me, makes this song a sonic experience and voyage each time I visit it.
It is this compositional intent and production approach that I will incorporate into my pending original music practice project.
This blog series is planned to continue next month with Music Practitioner Part 3. It is intended for this blog series to continue on a regular basis as I progress through my doctoral research project.
References
Australia Post 1998 stamp image courtesy of Australia Post.com. Accessed 4th October, 2014.
Max TV. 2014. The story of the real thing  http://www.maxtv.com.au/news/the-story-of-the-real-thing.aspx  Accessed 4th October, 2014.
Page, David L. 2014a. Life is About the Moment  Accessed 4th October, 2014.
Page, David L. 2014b. Music Practitioner Part 3  Accessed 18th October, 2014.
Wikipedia. 2014. The real thing (Russell Morris)   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Real_Thing_(Russell_Morris_song)  Accessed 4th October, 2014.
The Real Thing article courtesy of: The Real Thing Accessed 4th October, 2014.
The Real Thing video clip courtesy of: The Real Thing  Accessed 4th October, 2014.
The Wall of Sound article courtesy of:  The Wall of Sound  Accessed 4th October, 2014.
– ©David L Page 05/10/2014
– updated ©David L Page 18/10/2014
– updated ©David L Page 15/05/2016
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

Introduction to Audio Engineering

Welcome to Audio Engineering and the world of studios. A studio represents different things to different people. Some see it as a technical place to track and mix artists’ expression (Burgess 2014; Burgess 2013; Burgess 1997). Others see a studio as an instrument, in which to develop an artist’s ideas into something more, possibly fusing several musical styles into a new genre (Eno 2004; Eno 1982). Irrespective of your perspective and motivation, one needs to start at the beginning – the fundamentals.

Hans Zimmer Studio

                                          (Hans Zimmer home studio)
Knowledge and Skill base required
The practical knowledge and skillset required of an Audio Engineer/ Producer is both vast and very complex. In addition to the knowledge and skillset of mixing and recording, both in themselves very involved and potentially taking years to master, there are a range of other knowledge and skills required. There is a range of equipment to know about, and theories required to know the studio environment, and to be able to succeed in this position on a professional basis.
Whilst there is a common industry view that perhaps there is less onus on being an engineer in the original sense of the word in terms of analogue gear and being able to fix that gear in this era, I would argue that the extent of knowledge and skills required is no less vast and complex. In fact, I would argue that with the development of audio gear in this digital era, there is a broader knowledge and skillset base required than was previously required. Some of the aspects a budding Audio Engineer/Producer must become quite conversant with are:
Step 1
  • Firstly, one must understand a generic Studio Setup
  • Then one must learn the specifics of the particular Studio Setup. For example: the console, patchbay, interface, computer system, and assorted outboard peripherals
Step 2
  • Secondly, one must understand a generic Signal Flow of a console
  • Then one must learn the specifics of the particular console in the studio you are going to use. For example: MIDAS Heritage 1000 , Neve  VXS, SSL AWS 948, API Legacy, Amek Media 51, Euphonix System 5, Audio ASP8024, Behringer Eurodesk SX4882 or Behringer X32
Step 3
  • Thirdly, one must understand a generic audio interface, and what role it plays in the signal path of a modern studio (AD/DA)
  • Then one must learn the specifics of the particular audio interface (AD/DA). For example: Avid HD 16×16, Apogee Symphony, Antelope Audio Orian 32+, Universal Audio Apollo, Apogee Ensemble, Focusrite Saffire, Focusrite Scarlett, Fireface 800 or PreSonus Studio 192
Step 4
  • Fourthly, one must understand a generic Tape Device
  • Then one must learn the specifics of the particular tape device, whether magnetic or virtual tape. For example: Avid Pro Tools, Logic Pro, Reason, Ableton Live, FL Studio, or Reaper.
Step 5
  • Fifthly, one must understand generic principles behind peripherals for audio processing (outboard gear, etc), why we should use them, when we should use them, and how we should use them
  • Then one must learn the specifics of the particular peripherals for audio processing in the particular studio. For example: Teletronix LA-2A, Urei 1176, Fairchild 670, Tube-tech CL1B, Manley ELOP+, Neve 2254, DBX 160, Empirical Labs Distressor, SSL-G Series Bus Compressor, Manley Variable MU limiter, Chandler EMI TG1, Alesis 3630, API 3124+, Eventide Reverb 2016, Focusrite Octopre MkII Dynamic, or Behringer MDX2600 Composer
In addition to this studio environment knowledge base and skillset required as outline above, more than likely one will have to contend with the various one-off technical issues that will happen from day to day with either electrical or mechanical equipment limitations and/or malfunctions. As we each experience on a daily basis, these can be very prevalent and disrupt even the best laid plans for a mixing or recording session. There are a range of issues that can happen at any point in time in a studio, and therefore the modern day Audio Engineer/Producer must have a broad knowledge and skillset base in order to problem solve through these issues in order to move on with the object of the session; either to record, or to mix.
I have deliberately overlooked mentioning the additional soft skills knowledge and skillset required of an Audio Engineer/Producer in terms of daily interacting with people related to the studio environment. These soft skills include communication, negotiation, patience and social skills. Whilst extremely important knowledge and skillset to have, they could be considered to be beyond the realms of an industry-based subject matter expert (SME) in this discussion.
Additionally, if you are recording and mixing, then most assume that the modern Audio Engineer/Producer/producer must have a degree of understanding and skills in the creative arts processes of: songwriting, music, arrangement, and/or instrumentation to draw on as may be required for the client.
Therefore, in conclusion in this brief discussion, the practical knowledge and skillset required of a modern day Audio Engineer/Producer is still to this day very vast and complex.
A budding Audio Engineer/Producer must develop a very broad knowledge and skillset base across the disciplines of the industry subject matter, the broader relevant Creative Arts and the soft skills; in order to operate within and around the studio environment, and to be able to maximise their chance of developing a successful professional career as a Audio Engineer/Producer.
References
Burgess, Richard James. 2014. The history of music production. New York: Oxford University Press.
Burgess, Richard James. 2013. The art of music production: the theory and practice. New York: Oxford University Press.
Burgess, Richard James. 1997. The art of record production. London: Omnibus Press.
Eno, Brian. 2004. “The studio as compositional tool.” In Audio culture: readings in modern music, edited by Christoph Cox and Daniel Warner, 127-130. New York: Continuum.
Eno, Brian. 1982. Ambient 4: on land. Editions EG. Compact Disc.
Hans Zimmer’s home studio image courtesy of:  http://www.scpr.org/programs/the-frame/2015/01/20/41178/interstellar-composer-hans-zimmer-says-hollywood-i/?slide=2  Accessed 12th December 2015
– ©David L Page 09/05/2013
– updated ©David L Page 27/01/2016
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

Cultural Production Project Part 3

“Music is in life. It occurs everywhere – at any moment in time, in every place” (Page 2010)

Continuing on from last month’s Cultural Production Project – Part 2 [February 2010], I will focus this month on the actual project of fusing together three musical styles to create a soundscape that expresses myself musically and sonically.

~DL with Gretsch + C414.20141006.P21

Aim and Objective for this Project

To recap, the aim of this project is to refocus on a creative production project that allows me to create a natural musical style and arrangement.

fuse-together

The objective of this project is two-fold: to fuse multiple musical styles into a finished product – a soundscape that expresses myself musically and sonically; and to develop a greater understanding of my workflow in a virtual environment using both a range of technologies (software and hardware).

logic-pro-8-session

The three musical styles I intend to fuse are: folk-rock, new-age/spiritual, and soul-rock musical styles, creating a new fusion musical style.

The Fusion of the 3 Musical Styles into 1 Cultural Production

The musical styles I have described and analysed in Cultural Production Project – Part 2 [February 2010] are three-fold:
  • Rock n’ Soul/Neo Soul;
  • World Fusion/New Age;
  • Country Folk/Indie Rock.
The fusion of these three musical styles I believe has yet to be developed and exploited in the mass market. I believe this fusion is of three quite disparate musical styles could be described as a: rock track, with soulful overtones, a strong ethnic-flavoured instrumental/synthetic base, with possibly a simplistic real-type story and/or music-bed (harmony/melody) underlying the track.
The historical development of these specific musical styles can be best shown within the following graphic.
Historical Development of Specific Musical Styles.P3
The graphic shows:
  • the development of the two genres of Rock n’Roll and Soul, developing into the genres of Rock n’ Soul and Neo Soul. These two genres then develops into the genre of Nu Soul;
  • the development of the two genres of World Fusion and New Age into the genre of Nu World;
  • the development of Country and Folk into the genres of Country Rock and Folk Rock. These two genres then develop into the genre of Country Folk Rock, which in turn develops into the genre of Indie Rock.
Therefore, from now I am referring to the historical development of musical styles of:
  • World Fusion/New Age as Nu World;
  • Rock n’ Soul/Neo Soul as Nu Soul; and
  • Country Folk/ Rock as Indie Rock.
  • Collectively I will refer to the new three-part fusion musical style as Nu World IndiSoul.

The Production & Compositional Elements of Nu World IndiSoul

analysis-with-magnifying-glass

As part of my analysis, I will now discuss the production and compositional elements of the three musical styles.

Musical Style Name

Nu Soul

Nu World

Indie Rock

Production & Compositional Elements

Rock n’ Soul/

Neo Soul

World Fusion/

New Age

Country Folk/

Indie Rock

Story Line

Love –
love found/love lost/heartache
Survival
Life
Meditative/
Spiritual Connection
Life
Day to Day Life
Politics
Lifestyle
Life Ideals
Ethnic/Cultural Connections

Compositional

Tempo

100-130 bpm
90-120bpm
80-100 bpm

Chord variety

6-8 chords
2-4 chords
3-4 Chords

Time signature

Typically 4/4
A variety
Typically 4/4 or 3/4

Instrumentation

Organic
Synthetic + Organic Combination
Organic

Drums/Percussive

Straight Up Full Rock Kit
Hollow Drum/Jembahs/
/Shakers/Triangles
Partial/Jazz Drum Kit

Bass

Rock Bass and/or Upright Double Bass
Synth/s
Bass or Upright Double Bass

Chordal

Guitar and/or Keyboards
Synth/s
Guitar and/or Keyboards

Lead

Vocals
Chanting/
Pan Flute/Strings (Cello)
Vocals/
Harmony Vocals

Secondary lead Lines

Strings (eg violin)
Brass (eg saxophone/ trumpet)
Backup Vocals
Synth/s
Percussion
Strings (eg violin)
Brass (eg saxophone/ trumpet)
Backup Vocals

Breaks

Vocals/Guitar/ Keyboards
Synth/s
Vocals/
Harmony Vocals

Production

Production techniques typical in this musical style

Depending upon the producer and the chosen sound for the band for this particular project; & their desire to stay as close to organic/pure ‘rock’ sound, or their intention to stray as far away from organic as possible;
A number of producers are known for ‘wall of sound’ – Daniel Lanois, Brian Eno – using synths/layers to build up sound (eg U2, Coldplay).
Steve Lillywhite is known for organic, keeping the guitar sound as organic as they are produced at source (eg Bruce Springsteen)
Depending upon the producer and the chosen sound for the particular project; but generally keeping the sound ‘crisp, clear & clean’.
Depending upon the producer and the chosen sound for the band for this particular project; & their desire to stay as close to organic/pure ‘country’ or ‘folk’ sound, or their intention to stray as far away from organic as possible;
Jeff Lynne, in contrast to his ‘synthetic’ session band ELO, produced a very organic sound for the Travelling Wilburies, keeping the guitars and vocals of Bob Dylan, George Harrison, Tom Petty and himself sound as organic as they are produced at source

Mixing

Applying the principles of David Gibson’s “The Art Of Mixing” to this project. Using Volume, Panning, EQ, Reverb and FX to give the feeling of space and placement
[see Mixing blogs for greater explanation here]
Applying the principles of David Gibson’s “The Art Of Mixing” to this project. Using Volume, Panning, EQ, Reverb and FX to give the feeling of space and placement
[see Mixing blogs for greater explanation here]
Applying the principles of David Gibson’s “The Art Of Mixing” to this project. Using Volume, Panning, EQ, Reverb and FX to give the feeling of space and placement
[see Mixing blogs for greater explanation here]

Dynamics & Effects Processing

Depending upon the artist and their desire to stay as close to organic/pure ‘rock’ sound, or their intention to stray as far away from organic as possible; generally, moderate amounts of reverb and/or echo. Possibly the individual musicians will add FX to their instrument at source, as they have become known for their sound = ‘colour’
A lot of echo & reverb on all of the tracks – drums, vocals, keys – making even the ‘organic’ instruments sound synthetic – but clear’
Depending upon the artist and their desire to stay as close to organic/pure ‘country’ or ‘folk’ sound, or their adventure to stray as far away from organic as possible; generally, very little reverb and/or echo as possible

Prominent Producers & Engineers

Brian Eno; Daniel Lanois; Steve Lilywhite
Alan Parsons; Brian Eno; Mike Oldfield;
Ennio Morricone; Eric Serra
Jaques Levy; Daniel Lanois; Brendan O’Brien; Jeff Lynne; Glen Ballard; Scott Litt

Common release formats (ie: Vinyl, CD, DVD, Digital or combination)

Combination -CD, DVD, Digital
Combination -CD, DVD, Digital
Combination -CD, DVD, Digital

Live performances of musical style/artists

Yes, traditional rock venues; pubs; festivals
Yes, but also music in DJ events, nightclubs, etc; certain festivals; Not in traditional pop-rock performance venues; possibly in cultural events such as WOMAD etc
Yes, traditional live music venues; festivals; folk festivals

The Cultural Production

Below is a link to the actual Nu World IndiSoul cultural production, Termination. It is the result of the fusion of three quite disparate musical styles possibly best described as a: rock track, with soulful overtones, a strong ethnic-flavoured instrumental/synthetic base, with possibly a simplistic real-type story and/or music-bed (harmony/melody) underlying the track.
Soundcloud link:  The Termination

How Has This Project Influenced My Own Understanding of Production and Composition

Essentially this project has forced me to stop and consider what my influences are, and then be able to concisely articulate this into a musical style. Whilst I have spent many hours in the past considering such a question, it would seem there are benefits to choosing to explore a specific cultural production project within a specified time-frame .

How Will This Project Influence My Future Development, Including the On-going Development of Nu World IndiSoul

I believe this project will influence my future development by allowing me to express myself more congruently within my music practice:
  • of divine spirit;
  • of rock drive;
  • of folk/culture/roots;
I believe this project will influence my future development by allowing me to express myself within my music practice through the technology of:
  • organic instruments – allowing me to create with more flexibility/more efficiency than I could on the Porta 4 Studio several decades ago;
  • Whilst utilizing the convenience of synthetics/electronic instruments
    • time;
    • cost;
    • organization of people;
    • hiring of space;
    • allowing myself to be more self-sufficient;
    • allowing myself to become more experimental;
    • trialling varying structures;
    • trialling varying instrumentation;
    • trailing varying combinations of the above;
    • trialling varying fusions of organic & synthetic;
Ultimately creating the famous wall of sound/anthemic/stadium rock sounds of the 1980’s that so many great Rock n’ Soul/Neo Soul bands possessed with the use of additional synthetic sounds, and a number have since continued on to create and develop to a new level.

Summary – The Fused Musical style of Nu World IndiSoul

Historical Development of Specific Musical Styles.P3

I imagine Nu World IndiSoul to be a fusion of production and compositional elements from the three quite disparate musical styles of:
  • Rock n’ Soul/Neo Soul;
  • World Fusion/New Age;
  • Country Folk/Indie Rock.
Into the future, my vision is to:
  • continue to experiment with a combination of both organic and synthetic instruments;
  • continue to experiment with a combination of both organic and synthetic processing, adding a variety of FX
  • continue to experiment fusing the main lyrical message of the three musical styles; and as well,
  • continue to experiment fusing the three musical styles in terms of musical elements such as tempo, chord variety, and time signature.
In essence, it is to be an ethnic-flavoured rock track, lying on an interesting but simple music-bed (harmony/melody), layered with a combination of both organics and synthetics, and a connected-type story sitting comfortably within. I have referred throughout my music analysis to relevant audio examples of each of three musical styles, and summarized these in the references below.
References – Print Examples – Books/Magazines/Internet Sites

Rock n’ Soul/Neo Soul

World Fusion/New Age

Country Folk/Indie Rock

“The Illustrated New Musical Express Encyclopedia of Rock”
By Nick Logan & Bob Woffinden (1977)
 
“The Illustrated New Musical Express Encyclopedia of Rock”
By Nick Logan & Bob Woffinden (1977)
“Rock Lives – Profiles & Interviews” By Timothy White (1990)
 
“Rock Lives – Profiles & Interviews” By Timothy White (1990)
“Rock & Roll – The Music, Musicians and the Mania”
By Ted Greenwald (1992)
 
“Rock & Roll – The Music, Musicians and the Mania”
By Ted Greenwald (1992)
“Writing Music for Hit Songs” By Jai Josefs (1996)
“Writing Music for Hit Songs” By Jai Josefs (1996)
“Writing Music for Hit Songs” By Jai Josefs (1996)
“The Art of Mixing” by David Gibson (1997)
“The Art of Mixing” by David Gibson (1997)
“The Art of Mixing” by David Gibson (1997)
“The Usborne Internet-Linked Introduction To Music” By Eileen O’Brien (2000)
 
“The Usborne Internet-Linked Introduction To Music” By Eileen O’Brien (2000)
“The Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll”
By John Pareles 2001)
 
“The Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll”
By John Pareles (2001)
“Future Sounds –
An insider’s Guide To Making & Selling Music in The Digital Age” By Tom Frederiske & Adrien Cook (2001)
“Future Sounds –
An insider’s Guide To Making & Selling Music in The Digital Age” By Tom Frederiske & Adrien Cook (2001)
“Future Sounds –
An insider’s Guide To Making & Selling Music in The Digital Age” By Tom Frederiske & Adrien Cook (2001)
“PC Music – The Easy Guide”
By Robin Vincent (2006)
“Behind The Glass – Volume 1 + 11” By Howard Massey (2006+2008)
“Behind The Glass – Volume 1 + 11” By Howard Massey (2006+2008)
“Behind The Glass – Volume 1 + 11” By Howard Massey (2006+2008)
“The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock”
By Michael Heatley (2008)
“The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock”
By Michael Heatley (2008)
“Mixing Audio” By Roey Izhaki (2008)
“Mixing Audio” By Roey Izhaki (2008)
“Mixing Audio” By Roey Izhaki (2008)
Wikipedia
(internet as at Sept 2009)
 
References – Audio Examples – CD/MP3

Rock n’ Soul/Neo SouSoul

World Fusion/New Age 

Country Folk/Indie Rock

Bruce Springsteen ‘The River’
Peter Gabriel ‘Biko’
Bob Dylan ‘I Shall Be Released’
Bryan Adams ‘Cuts Like A Knife’
Amr Diab ‘Tamally Maak’
Tom Petty ‘Learning To Fly’
U2 ‘Where The Streets Have No Name’
Enigma ‘The Cross Of Changes’
Travelling Wilburys ‘I Was So Much Older Then…’
Hothouse Flowers ‘I Can See Clearly Now’
Deep Forest ‘Sweet Lullaby’
Alanis Morrisette ‘Ironic’
INXS ‘By My Side’
Oliver Shanti + Friends ‘Donovan My Timeless’
Paul Kelly ‘Leaps & Bounds’
Michael Jackson ‘Stranger In Moscow’ + ‘Billie Jean’
Nakai & Khecog ‘Winds Of Devotion’
Linda Ronstadt ‘The Blue Train’
 
Sacred Earth ‘Dancing Shiva’
 
 
Sina Vodjani ‘Straight To The Heart’
 
 
Moby ‘Look Back In’
 
~DL with Gretsch + C414.20141006.P21
References
Analysis image courtesy of:  Analysis  Accessed 8th March 2010
DLP  image courtesy of: DLP Accessed 8th March 2010
Historical Development of Musical Styles  image courtesy of: DLP  Accessed 8th March 2010
Logic Pro 8 image courtesy of:  Logic Pro 8 Accessed 8th March 2010
Page, David L. 2010  DLP Quote  Accessed 10th January, 2010
Planetary fusion image courtesy of: Planet Fusion Accessed 8th March 2010
– ©David L Page 09/03/2010
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

Cultural Production Project Part 2

“Music is in life. It occurs everywhere – at any moment in time, in every place” (Page 2010)

Continuing on from last month’s Cultural Production Project – Part 1 [January 2010], I will focus this month on a description and analysis of the three musical styles that I am choosing to fuse together in this creative production project – a soundscape that expresses myself musically and sonically.

logic-pro-8-session

Musical Style Analysis

fuse-together
To be an effective music producer, one needs to have a wide knowledge of musical styles and forms. The musical styles I have selected to draw on for my fusion-musical style are:
  • Rock n’ Soul/Neo Soul;
  • World Fusion/New Age;
  • Country Folk/Indie Rock.
I believe that these three (3 )musical styles are quite disparate musical styles. I will investigate these 3 musical styles of music using all available resources to me, such as the internet, magazines, books, dvd’s, documentaries, cd’s/albums/records. I will ensure I reference all resources used, and list these in the bibliography at the end of this document. As part of my analysis, I will firstly introduce the context of each of the three (3) musical styles in detail. I will then go through each of these against specific criteria.

analysis-with-magnifying-glass

Musical Style Analysis #1

Rock n’ Soul/Neo Soul context

Some contemporary examples of the Rock n’ Soul/Neo Soul musical style of music are:
  • Bruce Springsteen; Bryan Adams; U2; Hothouse Flowers; INXS; Michael Jackson.
-When did the Rock n’ Soul/Neo Soul musical style first appear (and if applicable the end date);
  • late 1960’s/early 1970’s Britain;
-Who were the founding artists of the Rock n’ Soul/Neo Soul musical style?
  • British Soul-Rock performers such as Joe Cocker; Procul Harum; Eric Burdon & The Animals; US Soul performers such as James Brown.
-What artists inspired the Rock n’ Soul/Neo Soul musical style?
  • US Rock n Roll such as Jerry Lee Lewis; Billy Hailey; Elvis Presley;
  • Afro-American Soul Rock such as James Brown; Freddie King; Booker T & The MG’s;
  • Motown/R+B/Soul Performers such a Curtis Mayfield; Eddie Floyd; Sam & Dave; Sam Cooke; Otis Redding; Wilson Picket; The 4 Tops; Bill Withers; Jackson Five; Michael Jackson; Alicia Keys.
-What records/albums/songs would be considered prime examples of the Rock n’ Soul/Neo Soul musical style?
  • Bruce Springsteen ‘The River’; Bryan Adams ‘Cuts Like A Knife’ ; U2 ‘Joshua Tree’; Hothouse Flowers ‘I Can See Clearly Now’; INXS ‘By My Side’; Michael Jackson ‘Stranger In Moscow’ + ‘Billie Jean’.
-What other musical styles inspired this Rock n’ Soul/Neo Soul musical style (What came before)?
  • Rock n’ Roll; Soul; R+B; Post-Dylan American Heroes; Pop-Rock.
– What Prominent Producers & Engineers work within this Rock n’ Soul/Neo Soul musical style?
  • Brian Eno; Daniel Lanois; Steve Lilywhite.
-How commercial successful and how popularly known is the Rock n’ Soul/Neo Soul musical style and why?
  • very successful in contemporary commercial/pop circles;
-What musical style and artists has this Rock n’ Soul/Neo Soul musical style inspired (What came after)?
–     Rock n’ Soul – U2; Simple Minds; Little Steven; INXS; Matchbox 20; Rob Thomas; Jeff Buckley; Government Mule; Hootie & The Blowfish; Coldplay.
–     Neo Soul; Amos Lee; Alicia Keys.

analysis-with-magnifying-glass

Musical Style Analysis #2

World Fusion/New Age context

 Some contemporary examples of the World Fusion/New Age musical style of music are:
  • Peter Gabriel; Amr Diab; Enigma; Deep Forest; Oliver Shanti; Nakai & Khecog; Sacred Earth; Moby; Sina Vodjani;
-When did the World Fusion/New Age musical style first appear (and if applicable the end date);
  • mid 1990’s Europe;
 -Who were the founding artists of the World Fusion/New Age musical style?
  • performers such as Deep Forest; Enigma;
-What artists inspired the World Fusion/New Age musical style?
  • Spiritual Performers such as Buddhist Monks; Gregorian Chants;
  • Traditional/Ethnic Performers; Ennio Morricone; Jai Uttal;
  • Disenchanted Successful ‘Rockstars looking for Spiritual/Life guidance such as The Beatles – John Lennon & George Harrison; Eric Clapton, Santana; Cat Stevens;
  • British Art Rock Performers such as Pink Floyd; Alan Parsons; Brian Eno; Roxy Music; Mike Oldfield;
  • British Progressive Rock Performers such as King Crimson; Genesis; YES;
  • Technopop Performers such as Kraftwerk; Jean-Michel Jarre;
  • New Age Performers such as Eric Serra; Oliver Shanti; Sacred Earth;
-What records/albums/songs would be considered prime examples of the World Fusion/New Age musical style?
  • Peter Gabriel ‘Biko’; Amr Diab ‘Tamally Maak’; Enigma ‘The Cross Of Changes’; Deep Forest ‘Sweet Lullaby’; Oliver Shanti + Friends ‘Donovan My Timeless’; Nakai & Khecog ‘Winds Of Devotion’; Sacred Earth ‘Dancing Shiva’; Sina Vodjani ‘Straight To The Heart’; Moby ‘Look Back In’;
-What other musical styles inspired this World Fusion/New Age musical style (What came before)?
  • Traditional Christian Religion/Music; Traditional Hindu Religion/Music; Traditional/Ethnic Performers; British Art Rock; British Progressive Rock; Technopop/Technodance (with synthesizer-based instrumentals); New Age;
– What Prominent Producers & Engineers work within this World Fusion/New Age musical style?
  • Alan Parsons; Brian Eno; Mike Oldfield; Ennio Morricone; Eric Serra;
-How commercial successful and how popularly known is the World Fusion/New Age musical style and why?
  • became popular within the new age/alternative therapy industry in the mid 1990’s, following a need for more instrumental’ based music that maintained a spiritual-base/spiritual connection, relevant to a peaceful, meditative environment for the therapy sessions and/or activities
-What musical style and artists has this World Fusion/New Age musical style inspired (What came after)?
–     World Fusion/New Age – The Buddha bar series; Enya;
–     Nature New age – Tony O’Connor;
–     Ambient Music – Brian Eno
–     Disco – Donna Summer; Bee Gees;
–     Dance – many forms, but including Moby as eg;
–     Nouveau Lounge Jazz – Billy Thunder;
–     Contemporary Visual performances such as Cirque de Solei;
–     EMP – the many and varied forms of electronic music and electronic dance music, such as chill, trance to name a few

analysis-with-magnifying-glass

Musical Style Analysis #3

Country Folk/Indie Rock context

Some contemporary examples of the Country Folk/Indie Rock musical style of music are:
  • Bob Dylan; Tom Petty; Travelling Wilburys; Alanis Morissette; Paul Kelly; Linda Ronstadt;
-When did the Country Folk/Indie Rock musical style first appear (and if applicable the end date);
  •  late 1960’s US;
 -Who were the founding artists of the Country Folk/Indie Rock musical style?
  • US Electric Country Folk Performers such as Buffalo Springfield; The Stone Ponies;
  • US Country Rock Performers such as The Flying Burrito Brothers; CCR;
  • US Electric Folk Performers such as The Byrds;
  • British Electric Folk/Folk Rock Performers such as Van Morrison; Pete Townsend
-What artists inspired the Country Folk/Indie Rock musical style?
  • US Folk Performers such as Woody Guthrie;
  • Country Performers such as Hank Williams; Patsy Cline;
  • Confessional Singer-Songwriters (drawing both on country and folk influences) such as Bob Dylan; Carole King; James Taylor; Joni Mitchell; Pete Townsend; Tim Buckley; Cat Stevens; Neil Young; Bruce Springsteen;
  • US Rock n Roll such as Jerry Lee Lewis; Billy Hailey;
  • US Country Rock Performers such as CCR;
  • US Folk Rock Performers such as The Byrds;
  • Rock Performers such as Rolling Stones; Jimi Hendrix; The Who;
-What records/albums/songs would be considered prime examples of the Country Folk/Indie Rock musical style?
  • Bob Dylan ‘I Shall Be Released’; Tom Petty ‘Learning To Fly’; Travelling Wilburys ‘I Was So Much Older Then…’; Alanis Morrisette ‘Ironic’; Paul Kelly ‘Leaps & Bounds’; Linda Ronstadt ‘The Blue Train’;
-What other musical styles inspired this Country Folk/Indie Rock musical style (What came before)?
  • Country; Folk; Country Rock; Folk Rock; Confessional singer-songwriter base; Rock n’ Roll; Rock; Pop-Rock
– What Prominent Producers & Engineers work within this Country Folk/Indie Rock musical style?
  • Jaques Levy; Daniel Lanois; Brendan O’Brien; Jeff Lynne; Glen Ballard; Scott Litt;
-How commercial successful and how popularly known is the Country Folk/Indie Rock musical style and why?
  • has perhaps had its main day in the 1980’s and 1990’s, but remains relevant, and ‘constant’, despite giving market share away to more current trends at the moment
-What musical style and artists has this Country Folk/Indie Rock musical style inspired (What came after)?
–     Country Folk/Indie Rock – Buckingham/Nicks; Suzanne Vega; Paul Kelly; Tracey Chapman; Alanis Morissette; Cracker;
–    Alternative Rock;
–    Indie Rock (Independent Rock) – REM, The Killers

analysis-with-magnifying-glass

Musical Style Analysis – Summary of the 3 Musical styles context

Context

Rock n’ Soul/Neo Soul

World Fusion/New Age

Country Folk/Indie Rock

Some contemporary examples of the musical style of music are:

Bruce Springsteen; Bryan Adams; U2; Hothouse Flowers; INXS; Michael Jackson
Peter Gabriel; Amr Diab; Enigma; Deep Forest; Oliver Shanti; Nakai & Khecog; Sacred Earth; Moby; Sina Vodjani;
Bob Dylan; Tom Petty; Travelling Wilburies;
Alanis Morissette; Paul Kelly; Linda Ronstadt;

When did the musical style first appear (and if applicable the end date):

Late 1960’s/early 1970’s Britain
mid 1990’s Europe
late 1960’s US

Who were the founding artists of the musical style:

British Soul-Rock performers such as Joe Cocker; Procul Harum; Eric Burdon & The Animals; US Soul performers such as James Brown.
New Age performers such as Peter Gabriel; Amr Diab; Enigma; Deep Forest;
US Electric Country Folk Performers such as Buffalo Springfield; The Stone Ponies;
US Country Rock Performers such as The Flying Burrito Brothers; CCR;
US Electric Folk Performers such as The Byrds;
British Electric Folk/Folk Rock Performers such as Van Morrison; Pete Townsend

What artists inspired the musical style:

US Rock n Roll such as Jerry Lee Lewis; Billy Hailey; Elvis Presley;   Afro-American Soul Rock such as James Brown; Freddie King; Booker T & The MG’s; Motown/R+B/Soul Performers such a Curtis Mayfield; Eddie Floyd; Sam & Dave; Sam Cooke; Otis Redding; Wilson Picket; The 4 Tops; Bill Withers; Jackson Five; Michael Jackson; Alicia Keys;
Spiritual Performers such as Buddhist Monks; Gregorian Chants; Traditional/ Ethnic Performers; Ennio Morricone; Jai Uttal; Disenchanted Successful ‘Rockstars looking for Spiritual/Life guidance such as The Beatles – John Lennon & George Harrison; Eric Clapton, Santana; Cat Stevens; British Art /Progressive Rock Performers such as Pink Floyd; Alan Parsons; Brian Eno; Roxy Music; Mike Oldfield; King Crimson; Genesis; YES; Technopop Performers such as Kraftwerk; Jean-Michel Jarre; World Fusion Performers such as Peter Gabriel; Amr Diab; New Age Performers such as Eric Serra; Oliver Shanti; Sacred Earth;
Folk Performers such as Woody Guthrie; Country Performers such as Hank Williams; Patsy Cline; Confessional Singer-Songwriters (drawing both on country and folk influences) such as Bob Dylan; Carole
King; James Taylor; Joni Mitchell; Pete Townsend; Tim Buckley; Cat Stevens; Neil Young; Bruce Springsteen;
US Rock n Roll such as Jerry Lee Lewis; Billy Hailey;
US Country Rock Performers such as CCR;
US Folk Rock Performers such as The Byrds;
Rock Performers such as Rolling Stones; Jimi Hendrix; The Who;

What records/ albums/songs would be considered prime examples of the musical style?

Bruce Springsteen ‘The River’; Bryan Adams ‘Cuts Like A Knife’; U2 ‘Where The Streets Have No Name’; Hothouse Flowers ‘I Can See Clearly Now’; INXS ‘By My Side’; Michael Jackson ‘Stranger In Moscow’ + ‘Billie Jean’;
Peter Gabriel ‘Biko’; Amr Diab ‘Tamally Maak’; Enigma ‘The Cross Of Changes’; Deep Forest ‘Sweet Lullaby’; Oliver Shanti + Friends ‘Donovan My Timeless’; Nakai & Khecog ‘Winds Of Devotion’; Sacred Earth ‘Dancing Shiva’;
Sina Vodjani ‘Straight To The Heart’; Moby ‘Look Back In’;
Bob Dylan ‘I Shall Be Released’; Tom Petty ‘Learning To Fly’; Travelling Wilburys ‘I Was So Much Older Then…’; Alanis Morrisette ‘Ironic’; Paul Kelly ‘Leaps & Bounds’; Linda Ronstadt ‘The Blue Train’;

What other musical styles inspired this musical style (What came before)?

Rock n’ Roll; Soul; R+B; Post-Dylan American Heroes; Pop-Rock;
Traditional Christian Religion/Music; Traditional Hindu Religion/Music; Traditional/Ethnic Performers; British Art /Progressive Rock; Technopop/Technodance (with synthesizer-based instrumentals); World Fusion; New Age;
Country; Folk; Country Rock; Folk Rock; Confessional singer-songwriter base; Rock n’ Roll; Rock; Pop-Rock

Prominent Producers & Engineers:

Brian Eno; Daniel Lanois; Steve Lilywhite
Alan Parsons; Brian Eno; Mike Oldfield;
Ennio Morricone; Eric Serra;
Jaques Levy; Daniel Lanois; Brendan O’Brien; Jeff Lynne; Glen Ballard; Scott Litt;

How commercial successful and how popularly known is the musical style and why?

very successful in contemporary commercial/pop circles
became popular within the new age/alternative therapy industry in the mid 1990’s, following a need for more instrumental’ based music that maintained a spiritual-base/spiritual connection, relevant to a peaceful, meditative environment for the therapy sessions and/or activities
has perhaps had its main hey day in the 1980’s and 1990’s, but remains relevant, and ‘constant’, despite giving market share away to more current trends at the moment

What musical style and artists has this musical style inspired (What came after)?

Rock n’ Soul – U2; Simple Minds; Little Steven; INXS; Matchbox 20; Rob Thomas; Jeff Buckley; Government Mule; Hootie & The Blowfish; Coldplay;
Neo Soul; Amos Lee; Alicia Keys;
World Fusion/New Age –The Buddha bar series; Enya;
Nature New age – Tony O’Connor;
–     Ambient Music – Brian Eno
–     Disco – Donna Summer; Bee Gees;
–     Dance – many forms, but including Moby as eg;
–     Nouveau Lounge Jazz – Billy Thunder;
–     Contemporary Visual performances such as Cirque de Solei;
–     EMP – the many and varied forms of electronic music and electronic dance music, such as chill, trance to name a few
Country Folk/Indie Rock – Buckingham/Nicks; Suzanne Vega; Paul Kelly; Tracey Chapman; Alanis Morissette; Cracker;
Alternative Rock;
Indie Rock (Independent Rock) – REM, The Killers
I will continue next month with Cultural Production Project Part 3 [March 2010], focussing on a description and analysis of the three musical styles that I am choosing to fuse together in this creative production project – a soundscape that expresses myself musically and sonically. I have referred throughout my music analysis to relevant audio examples of each of three musical styles, and summarized these in the references below.
References – Print Examples – Books/Magazines/Internet Sites

Rock n’ Soul/Neo Soul

World Fusion/New Age

Country Folk/Indie Rock

“The Illustrated New Musical Express Encyclopedia of Rock”
By Nick Logan & Bob Woffinden (1977)
 
“The Illustrated New Musical Express Encyclopedia of Rock”
By Nick Logan & Bob Woffinden (1977)
“Rock Lives – Profiles & Interviews” By Timothy White (1990)
 
“Rock Lives – Profiles & Interviews” By Timothy White (1990)
“Rock & Roll – The Music, Musicians and the Mania”
By Ted Greenwald (1992)
 
“Rock & Roll – The Music, Musicians and the Mania”
By Ted Greenwald (1992)
“Writing Music for Hit Songs” By Jai Josefs (1996)
“Writing Music for Hit Songs” By Jai Josefs (1996)
“Writing Music for Hit Songs” By Jai Josefs (1996)
“The Art of Mixing” by David Gibson (1997)
“The Art of Mixing” by David Gibson (1997)
“The Art of Mixing” by David Gibson (1997)
“The Usborne Internet-Linked Introduction To Music” By Eileen O’Brien (2000)
 
“The Usborne Internet-Linked Introduction To Music” By Eileen O’Brien (2000)
“The Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll”
By John Pareles 2001)
 
“The Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll”
By John Pareles (2001)
“Future Sounds –
An insider’s Guide To Making & Selling Music in The Digital Age” By Tom Frederiske & Adrien Cook (2001)
“Future Sounds –
An insider’s Guide To Making & Selling Music in The Digital Age” By Tom Frederiske & Adrien Cook (2001)
“Future Sounds –
An insider’s Guide To Making & Selling Music in The Digital Age” By Tom Frederiske & Adrien Cook (2001)
“PC Music – The Easy Guide”
By Robin Vincent (2006)
“Behind The Glass – Volume 1 + 11” By Howard Massey (2006+2008)
“Behind The Glass – Volume 1 + 11” By Howard Massey (2006+2008)
“Behind The Glass – Volume 1 + 11” By Howard Massey (2006+2008)
“The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock”
By Michael Heatley (2008)
“The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock”
By Michael Heatley (2008)
“Mixing Audio” By Roey Izhaki (2008)
“Mixing Audio” By Roey Izhaki (2008)
“Mixing Audio” By Roey Izhaki (2008)
Wikipedia
(internet as at Sept 2009)
 
References – Audio Examples – CD/MP3

Rock n’ Soul/Neo SouSoul

World Fusion/New Age

Country Folk/Indie Rock

Bruce Springsteen ‘The River’
Peter Gabriel ‘Biko’
Bob Dylan ‘I Shall Be Released’
Bryan Adams ‘Cuts Like A Knife’
Amr Diab ‘Tamally Maak’
Tom Petty ‘Learning To Fly’
U2 ‘Where The Streets Have No Name’
Enigma ‘The Cross Of Changes’
Travelling Wilburys ‘I Was So Much Older Then…’
Hothouse Flowers ‘I Can See Clearly Now’
Deep Forest ‘Sweet Lullaby’
Alanis Morrisette ‘Ironic’
INXS ‘By My Side’
Oliver Shanti + Friends ‘Donovan My Timeless’
Paul Kelly ‘Leaps & Bounds’
Michael Jackson ‘Stranger In Moscow’ + ‘Billie Jean’
Nakai & Khecog ‘Winds Of Devotion’
Linda Ronstadt ‘The Blue Train’
 
Sacred Earth ‘Dancing Shiva’
 
 
Sina Vodjani ‘Straight To The Heart’
 
 
Moby ‘Look Back In’
 
~DL with Gretsch + C414.20141006.P21
References
Analysis image courtesy of:  Analysis  Accessed 6th February 2010
DLP  image courtesy of: DLP Accessed 6th February 2010
Logic Pro 8 image courtesy of:  Logic Pro 8 Accessed 6th February 2010
Page, David L. 2010  DLP Quote  Accessed 10th January, 2010
Planetary fusion image courtesy of: Planet Fusion Accessed 6th February 2010
– ©David L Page 06/02/2010
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

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