Who I am……

David L Page logo.20141231.v2_resize4

(Page 2017a)

Me, myself, I – the multi-facetted/multi-dimensional practitioner

As described in my blog Research Practitioner Part 16 (Page 2017b), I am a multi-facetted/multi-dimensional practitioner – a practitioner across multiple practices of education & learning, research study commitments, creative practice, professional consulting practice and family responsibilities. I concluded that:
“All of my practice informs my self; and my self informs my practice – irrespective of the industry, the field, the discipline, or the site”(Page 2017c).

~DLP Pro Image Fun 5b small.20141020

(Page 2017g)

A broad definition of me, myself, I – the creative practitioner

You will note that in terms of creative practice, I refer to my self as a creative practitioner. I consciously choose to use this broad term, not specific to any particular discipline – as I see  my self as a creative being who likes to engage in a broad range – a very broad range – of creative practice. Whilst I love to engage in what I would classify as the primary focus of my creative practice – music and sound; listening, creating and performing –  music and sound alone does not define me. Being passionate about music and sound does not mean that I am not also passionate about other forms of creative practice. I am a multi-facetted person, with many diverse dimensions to who I am as a being, and in what I love to engage in. I engage in visual arts, in design, in film and animation.

Engagement with particular creative media platforms for particular purposes

I also engage in web, but I see this as not so much as a creative process where I am creating,  I see my engagement with web as a creative process in terms of function; curation for gathering resources to use as a practitioner; curation of resources to source inspiration; resources of others practice and/or viewpoints that assist me in the reflection process; to create a sense of identity – for my self, and for others; and, to market and distribute my creative practice.
As I indicated in my blog Media Identity & Curation Part 2 (Page 2014), I apply a diverse media strategy to include my media sites of:  about.me, gravatar.com, wordpress.com, tumblr.com, twitter.com, linked-in.com, myspace.com, facebook.com, pinterest.com, you-tube.com, soundcloud.com, instagram.com, lastfm.com, slideshare.com, googlescholar.com, academia.com and google.com. I use these media sites for quite specific purposes.
  • For example, David L Page wordpress.com (Page 2017d) allows me to communicate detail of my professional practice – as a creative practitioner/subject, as a education & learner practitioner, as a reflective practitioner, as a management practitioner, and as a a researcher/observer in any or all of these areas.

    wordpress-site-20160129

    (Page 2017d)
  • I use David L Page Pinterest.com (Page 2017e) to provide a curated static visual view of my multi-facetted self. I am a professional practitioner who loves diversity. I love culture, having been blessed to live across three diverse cultures to date – European Australian, Japanese, Indian. I have experienced many more cultures in my global travels. I love all things music and sound – audio, in terms of production (tracking), post-production, live and theory. I believe in the access of education for everyone (referred to as community education). I love performance. I love fast fun things. I love the environment. .. I love… I love…. I love… I love…..
    Pinterest Board Categories.20160306.P1b
(Page 2017e)
  • I use David L Page you-tube.com (Page 2017f) to provide a curated audio-visual view of my multi-facetted self. As indicated above, I am a professional practitioner who loves diversity, culture, all things music and sound, education for everyone, performance, comedy, or fast fun things.. I love diversity…. 
David L Page You-tube channel.201706011
(Page 2017f)

Engagement with particular creative media mediums dictates what cultural productions I engage in

How I engage in media depends upon what cultural production – what cultural artifact – I will engage in at any particular time. Depending upon the medium I choose to listen to music or soundtracks will depend upon what I choose to listen to. Am I going to use the internet to stream; an iPod; a CD player – in a house, or a CD player in a car; a car radio; a portable tape player; a cheap record player; a high-end stereo system; or a high end 5.1 surround sound hi-fi system?
It is the same situation for visual arts and design. Depending upon the medium I choose to view visual arts and design will depend upon what I choose to view. on a small screen device such as an iPhone; via a static image platform such as Pinterest.com; via an audio-visual dynamic image platform such as you-tube.com; in a small art gallery with physical visual art or graphic displays; in a large National art gallery with physical visual art or graphic displays?
It is the same situation for film. Depending upon the medium I choose to watch film will depend upon what I choose to watch: on a portable small screen device such as an iPhone; a portable smallish screen device such as a laptop; on a small screen TV; on a large screen TV with a hi-fi 5.1 surround system; in a local suburban cinema; in a surround sound movie theatre equipped with dolby; or an outdoor drive in movie theatre with a window mono speaker system?
As a creative practitioner, I have listed examples below of media across four (4) disciplines and how I view them. Providing examples of four (4) different creative media disciplines I believe enables me to make my point of how engagement with particular creative media mediums very much dictates what cultural productions I actually engage in at any point in time.

~Music_staff Blue

(AE 2015a)
1. 4 different listening behaviours I exhibit:
  • eg 1: Pink Floyd’s “Dark Side of the Moon” for me, is best listened in the medium of an album, played on a HiFi record player system, in one sitting, in a comfortable chair, with ambient/subdued lighting (lava lamps etc), at the end of a day. Strict rule – no talking during each side… Flipping the album from side 1 to side 2 is the opportunity to have a break if one needs;

Dark Side of the Moon_Pink Floyd.1973

(Pink Floyd 1973)
  • eg 2: Tim Buckley’s “Greetings from LA” must be played as a full album, in sequence , in one go. I do not mind what medium I listen to it on (album on stereo, cassette tape, on itunes in car system, studio system, or on laptop/desktop/ipod/iphone via studio quality headphones) BUT MUST be listened to in sequence, at one time! (not negotiable);

Greetings From LA_Tim_Buckley.1972

(Buckley 1972)
  • eg 3: Where I did not buy the artist’s songs as an album, or I did, but I have never or have infrequently listened to it as a continuous complete album, I am happy to play the songs randomly in a multi-artist, multi-genre playlist via any medium (generally on itunes in car system, studio system, or on laptop/desktop/ipod/iphone via studio quality headphones);
  • eg 4: ambient music, or dance music for me is about a soundtrack to my life at that moment in time, supporting my emotional or physical state at that time, or my desired emotional or physical state at that time. I am happy to play the songs randomly in a multi-artist, signle-genre playlist via any medium (generally on itunes in car system, studio system, or on laptop/desktop/ipod/iphone via studio quality headphones).
    John Olsen_Sydney Sun [or King Sun] 1965, National Gallery of Australia © John Olsen.jpg(Olsen 2017)
2. 4 different visual arts and design viewing behaviours I exhibit:
  • eg 1: traditional art – physical paintings, etc – I do like to see in an art gallery, particularly a curated art gallery with a theme, or an artist’s works.. I like taking time to wander around in a relaxed stated;
  • eg 2: In saying that, I usually also like to have copies of my favourite works electronically (desktop pictures, pinterest, etc) to see and remind myself of that experience in the art gallery;
  • eg 3: I do view traditional art – physical paintings, etc – in coffee table books, but generally to see and remind myself of that experience in the art gallery…. eg 4: virtual design is ok on most modern mediums (laptop, desktop, etc). However in saying this, I tend not to view on smaller virtual devices such as iphones, as images gets lost/loses visual impact for me being so small, etc;
  • eg 4: Functional design, such as promotional or marketing brochures for me are best in a physical tactile state. i like to pour over them, digest them, turn the page, revisit the previous page, perhaps circle or add notes around the borders of the text that I may be attracted to, and have further questions about. I tend to want to engage physically with these mediums;
  • eg 5: virtual creative, artistic design is ok on most modern mediums (laptop, desktop, etc). However in saying this, I tend not to view on smaller virtual devices such as iphones, as images gets lost/loses visual impact for me being so small, etc.
3.4 different film viewing behaviours I exhibit:
  • eg 1: I most like watching feature movies on a movie theatre wide screen and sound system. However, I mostly watch them on my 65″ home TV with sound system – for convenience. For me, watching movies is a shared experience, watching with someone. I do not like watching animation movies on laptops or small screen for both the limited visual and audio experience, but mainly for the lack of watching in a relaxed shared experience environment. An example of a movie that i have seen in these conditions would be “Shawshank Redemption”;

Shawshank Redemption_CastleRockEntertainment.1994.jpg

(Entertainment, Castle Rock. 1994)
  • eg 2: Certain movies eg (original) “Point Break”, “Star Wars” are a cinematic experience, and lose a great detail of impact for me when not watched in cinema, but on my home TV system;
  • eg 3: Where I want to view a trailer to see if I am interested in watching it in full, I am happy to watch them on alternate mediums such as a laptop or desktop
  • eg 4: Certain movies eg “Blair Witch Project” I believe benefit from being watched on alternate mediums such as a laptop or desktop as this smaller – more intimate? individual? secretive? medium lends itself more to the intent of the narrative in my opinion.
4. 3 different animation viewing behaviours I exhibit:
  • eg 1: I most like watching feature animation movies on a movie theatre wide screen and sound system. However, I mostly watch them from the second or third time via a DVD on my 65″ home TV with sound system – for convenience. “Lion King” is a good example of this. For me – now – “Lion King” is best listened to (note, not necessairly watched) in one go. It can be in background playing as i am working. In one particular period when i was working home over a three (3) month period, I recall “Lion King” was playing in the background on repeat, all day, every day for those three (3) months;

    The Lion King_Walt Disney Pictures.1994

    (Disney 1994)
  • eg 2: I most like watching animation movies (eg Disney or Pixar) on a movie theatre wide screen and sound system. However, I mostly watch them on my 65″ home TV with sound system – for convenience. I do not like watching animation movies on laptops or small screen for both the limited visual and audio experience;
  • eg 3: Where there are short animations (3 minute Pixar), I am happy to watch them on alternate mediums such as a laptop or desktop, just to entertain myself for a short moment to lift my mood, distract me, etc.
5. x different games viewing behaviours I exhibit:
  • eg 1: No contribution possible. mes not a gameboy!!!

Conclusion

What creative media medium I engage with will dictate to a degree what cultural production – what cultural artifact – I will engage in at any particular time.  As a creative practitioner, I have provided examples across four (4) disciplines of how I may engage in particular creative media mediums, dictating what cultural productions – what cultural artifacts – I engage in at any point in time.
I love many, varied forms of creative media,  In my personal situation  have access to many, varied creative media mediums:  the internet; an iPod; a CD player – in a house, or a CD player in a car; a car radio; a portable tape player; a cheap record player; a high-end stereo system; or a high end 5.1 surround sound hi-fi system; a small screen device such as an iPhone; a laptop; a desktop; static image platform such as Pinterest.com; via an audio-visual dynamic image platform such as you-tube.com; a small art gallery with physical visual art or graphic displays; a large National art gallery with physical visual art or graphic displays; a small screen TV; a large screen TV with a hi-fi 5.1 surround system; a local suburban cinema; in a surround sound movie theatre equipped with dolby; or an outdoor drive in movie theatre with a window mono speaker system. Most of us in western countries have many, varied options and access in this era.
The mediums one chooses to access media through, could therefore dictate what media you actually engage in.
  • How do you access creative media?
  • How does this inform what cultural production – what cultural artifact – you choose to engage in at any point in time?
References
AE 2015a Music note montage in the universe image courtesy of: Angelic Exorcism (AE) Studio Projects  Accessed 11th March 2015
Buckley, Tim. 1972. Greetings from LA. Straight Records. Vinyl LP.
Disney, Walt. 1994. The lion king. Walt Disney Feature Animation. DVD.
DLP 2017a image courtesy of David L Page  Accessed 11th June, 2017
DLP 2017g image courtesy of David L Page Accessed 11th June, 2017
Entertainment, Castle Rock. 1994. The shawshank redemption. Colombia Pictures. DVD.
Olsen 2017 image courtesy of Sydney Sun [or King Sun] 1965, National Gallery of Australia © John Olsen  Accessed 11th June, 2017
Page, David L. 2017b Research Practitioner Part 16 Accessed 11th June, 2017
Page, David L. 2017c Research Practitioner Part 18 Accessed 11th June, 2017
Page, David L. 2017d  David L Page wordpress.com  Accessed 11th June, 2017
Page, David L. 2017e  David L Page Pinterest.com  Accessed 11th June, 2017
Page, David L. 2017f David L Page you-tube.com  Accessed 11th June, 2017
Page, David L. 2014 Media Identity & Curation Part 2  Accessed 11th June, 2017
Floyd, Pink. 1973. Dark side of the moon. Harvest. Vinyl LP.
– ©David L Page 11/06/2017
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

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Research Practitioner Part 24

onion-layers

Research Study

Abstract

The aim of this Doctor of Creative Industries Research Project is to investigate both my DIY music practice and my self as a practitioner during the process of creating and producing a cultural artefact (EP).  My research study is designed to be a multi-method qualitative study: a practice-based, ethnographic study that is to include a first-person narrative of my personal journey, critical reflection and reflexive practice, highlighting the co-constituted nature of my music-making practice. As an auto-ethnographic study, I designed the project for me to be performing the dual primary roles of being both the practitioner as subject, and the researcher. Such a multi-tiered examination represents a significant departure from current discussion of music practice, developing praxis of contemporary music practice. In this Project 1 research study exegesis submission I narrate the process to date, highlighting observation around my practitioner self, and my music practice and the emergent distinctions integrated into my developing music praxis.

~DL with Gretsch + C414.20141006.P21

(DLP 2015a)

Preamble

Continuing on from my previous blogs in this series….

In the beginning……

My journey in music-making commenced a number of decades ago. I made music via physical instruments without much thought of the process. I strummed chords on a guitar or piano, hummed or played a melodic phrase, developed lyrics, and over time a song emerged. I felt connected to the process; I felt connected to the music. I recall getting positive feedback when I shared my acoustic instrument-based songs with an audience. I followed this process several hundred times over several decades, and because of the relative ease these songs came to me, I did not feel a need to consider my music-making process.
As technologies developed, I transitioned into music-making using digital virtual technologies. I invested in virtual technologies, trialling a number of virtual music-making applications – digital audio workstations (DAWs). I experimented; I spoke to local pro audio retailers; I experimented some more; I bought instructional books and videos; I studied; I experimented a lot more. Over a number of years however, I found that irrespective of how much time and money I invested into my virtual music-making production practice, I never managed to achieve a similar flow or a similar feeling – a creative high – as I had music-making using physical instruments. My frustration using virtual technologies to make music grew. I enrolled into a practical tertiary course. The course assisted me greatly to develop my theory and practical skills. However, using virtual technologies to make music that I felt connected to, (largely) continued to elude me. There was one instance, a remix project where I felt a connection. That experience gave me hope that my attempts to use virtual technologies to make music I felt connected to, was not going to be in vain. I continued to experiment; I continued to read; I continued to invest; I continue to immerse my self into my virtual music-making production practice. However, I still found I wasn’t achieving a similar flow or a similar feeling – a creative high – using virtual technologies to make music as I had music-making using physical instruments. My frustration was at an all-time high. I had arrived at a juncture in my life where I felt there was now no alternative: my virtual music-making production practice needed an intervention. I needed to put my creative practice using virtual technologies to make music under scrutiny. In 2014 I applied to a formal academic research program – a professional doctorate program. I commenced the program in 2015. My formal research journey began.

My doctoral research study……

Research Study – 1st Observation:
I acknowledged that I approached my music-making practice in terms of the outcome – the finished product. I was not considering the process in which I was music-making, any more than with a cursory glance. My music-making practice was product-driven.

Starting Point_1st Observation.P1.png

(DLP 2017a)
I recognised that I approached my music-making with physical instruments in a different manner to my approach to music-making using virtual technologies (using my laptop to make music for example). In drilling down I determined that much of this was how I viewed both devices.
Physical instruments as I played were derived directly from nature. Pianos and guitars that I played were manufactured from woods from the forest. They are physical instruments that have natural resonant qualities. The woods expand and contract, depending upon temperature and humidity. They are large instruments that I can touch, embrace and/or feel the resonant qualities as they are played.
I viewed virtual technologies very differently. The actual device that housed the music-making application software (DAW) was a computer (a laptop for example). I saw a laptop as a device that houses many many application software that enabled me to record data and/or make transactions. I used computer technologies for administrative purposes (applications such as iNote, word, excel, etc); organisation purposes (applications such as iCal, reminders, etc); and everyday personal and business management (services such as the internet-based social media sites, banking sites, utility sites to pay bills, etc). I viewed the music-making application software (DAW) as somewhat removed from me. It was housed in a aluminium and plastic case, that I could see, but not touch. The virtual keyboards were engaged by pressing a computer keyboard letter;  or perhaps a key on a plastic physical keyboard controller. Neither devices are derived directly from nature. They are manufactured. A computer and a keyboard controller are physical devices which also have natural resonant qualities. They only minimally expand and contract in extreme conditions, with such occurrences perhaps likely to render these devices inoperable. There is also a slight delay between the time you touch the key and having the sound emitted out of the computer monitors. They are not what I consider to be large resonant devices that can be embraced and/or feel the resonant qualities as they are played, such as I experience with a piano or guitar.
Research Study – 2nd Observation:
As I attempted to scope out the parameters of my research study,  I was led to look at the industry of my practice, the field of music production, and the particular discipline of virtual technologies to make music. This process revealed gaps in my knowledge, and enabled me to form linkages across several strands within the field of contemporary music production.
I then looked in greater detail at the history of my practice, understanding for perhaps the first time the implications of how I approached my music-making practice – as product rather than process.  I also started to consider me as a practitioner, as the music-maker. Who was I? How did I arrive to be this person?
My eyes were starting to open.
Starting Point_1st Observation.P2a
(DLP 2017b)
Project 1 Pilot Study – 3rd Observation:
As I progressed my initial Project 1 Pilot Study, exploring the parameters of my music-making practice, I started to highlight certain elements which I considered key to my practice. As a flow on from my music-making practice, I acknowledged that the self was an element that had to be included. What motivated me to practice?
Phase 1_3rd Observation.P3b
(DLP 2017c)
My music praxis (v4) had six (6) elements listed: self, motive, music style, location, technology and workflow.
dlp-music-praxis-v4-large-with-lines-20151203-p1
(DLP 2015b)
My initial pilot study was to be an exploratory investigation to determine the parameters of my music practice; and to investigate what – if any – relationship existed between these elements. I engaged in conscious, deliberate and systematic reflective and reflexive practice of my creative practice, and as part of this process I felt obligated to consider everything that I observed.
As I progressively immersed myself into my quite isolated pilot study, I began to focus in on what I was doing at any point in time, as both the practitioner subject and the observer/researcher. To juggle both responsibilities was not beyond challenge and limitations. How was I to do both – be the creative practitioner, and simultaneously observe my practice?
Project 1 Pilot Study – 5th Observation:
One of the first elements I noted to be part of my developing music praxis (v5) – beyond the initial six (6) elements I had observed at the time of my Project Brief submission – was listening. I noticed listening was central to agency within my practice. Listening directed my choices and decision-making within my practice in terms of music style – in my ability to critically and analytically listen to reference tracks; in terms of my selecting appropriate notes and/or sonic event samples during the creative, pre-production or production stages; in terms of hearing needed or possible options of contra-melodies, rhythms, harmonies or instrumentation during the creative, pre-production or production stages; in terms of determining the degree of adjustment of sound sources or processing that needed to occur during the production or post-production stages.

Phase 1_5th Observation.P5c

(DLP 2017d)
I started to observe that a central aspect of this listening was also in terms of my practice overall, such as deciding when I needed to have a break. Yes, listening to an inner voice, reminding me I was in need a break from creative practice. I started to notice by paying more attention to my self – to listening to my self – there was a great deal of head chatter occurring while I was engaged in practice.
DLP DCI Praxis v5i.20160531.P1
(DLP 2016a)
I had always known of my head chatter, but had accepted it by my mid-twenties as the outpouring of my inner fears as I approached a new experience. By my early-thirties I had learnt to manipulate this head-chatter, to work for me rather than against me. I used my head chatter to consciously motivate and focus my self. I have continued to develop this practice throughout my life, assisting me in preparing for any form of performance, be it: public speaking, education practice (as educator), learning practice (as learner in formal instrument or personal development), and my music practice (on stage performing). However, I had never considered, nor explored my head chatter beyond this; particularly within the context of my creative practice.
As I listened more, I recognised that this head chatter – inner speech – did not just consist of just one voice, but were in fact multiple voices; multiple voices with multiple perspectives. As I focussed in on my listening – consciously, deliberately and systematically – I realised these voices were not necessarily independent. There was often a dialogue occurring between them. As I honed my focus and developed my inner listening, I noticed that the dialogue within my head was occurring across three perspectives of time – one of now; one of past; and one of future. In effect, three voices representative of each point in time. As Wiley (2010, P17) refers to it: the I of the present; the me of the past; and the you of the future. An epiphany. A light bulb moment, an ‘aha’ moment for me. The head chatter – as I had always referred to it – that had accompanied me in so many events and stage of my life, was indeed the inner speech of my dialogic self.
As my immersion in reflective and reflexive practice of my research study deepened, I honed in on the incessant daily dialogue of my dialogical self and began to distinguish between the inner speech – the three inner voices, the triadic voices of the I, the me, and the you – for each of my three selves operating at any point in time within the site of my practice: the self, the practitioner self and the observer/researcher self. I would take time to listen to the dialogue at any point in time during my creative practice, as they considered and debated: what I was seeing or observing, what I was hearing, what I was feeling, what I was imagining, what I was recalling, what I was smelling, or even what I was tasting; in order to better understand my music praxis. I devised ways to take notes during my practice of these daily triadic conversations, in order to return to them, reflect on them, and decode them. My music praxis developed as a result of this process, to not only acknowledge significantly more stages and elements of my music-making process; but, perhaps most significantly, the non-linear form of my music praxis (v8i).

DLP DCI Praxis v8i.20161231.P1.png

(DLP 2016b)
I realised my music praxis was in fact very circular, with reflective and reflexive practice occurring constantly at any point in time. ­
My practice has now developed to the point where I can engage in multiple forms of listening whilst immersed and engaged in any stage of practice. I can now distinguish between the triadic voices of my three selves: the self, the practitioner self and the observer/researcher self in the present, the past, and the future within a very short amount of time, or sometimes, almost instantaneously and/or simultaneously. Just as my critical and analytical listening has developed over many decades of practice, my ability to listen and decipher the dialogue occurring within my dialogical selves at any point in time has also developed.
I liken this developed complex skill to other forms of practice where multiple tasks are required in sequence over a very short amount of time, often times almost instantaneously and/or simultaneously. The practice of driving a car and the practice of performing are similar type complex skills that need to be learnt; and are often awkward or impossible when one first attempts them with no prior experience. The act of driving a car – accelerating, braking, looking to the side for another car, indicating, moving lanes, whilst watching cars to the side, in front and behind is an example of such a complex task. Another example of a complex task would be leading a band, singing into a microphone, engaging an audience, playing guitar, and selecting guitar floor pedals, over a very short amount of time, often times almost instantaneously and/or simultaneously. I recall when I was younger, that I would never be able to learn how to do both complex tasks. Now I reflect on how many times a year I engage in both practices without any preparation, and perform them to a very high level of practice: almost unconsciously.
Learning about, and getting to know my dialogical self has assisted my music practice exponentially. As part of the process, I have developed a greater understanding of my self which in turn informed my practitioner self. This in turn allowed me to develop my music praxis to a greater depth and level of detail than I was able to previously. I now have far greater agency of my praxis (v9k), and its twenty-one (21) interdependent elements, at each of the various eight (8) stages of my creative practice.
DLP DCI Praxis v9i.20170420.P1
(DLP 2017e)
As a result, I have far greater agency of my praxis (v9k) while music-making. I am now exponentially more focussed and more deliberate in my practice, most noticeably in my music-making within virtual technologies. I have found my self now responding within my music-making micro workflow in a similar vein to that of my performing – improvising – on my long-term physical instrument of choice, the electric guitar. I observe that I now engage – almost instantaneously and/or simultaneously – in the voices of the I, the me, and the you – at any point in time, within my site/s of practice. A split second in-practice, on-practice and for-practice dialogue – in performance, in assessment of what the practitioner self just heard or performed, in consideration of what options the practitioner self now has before them, their decision as to what they want to express, and the performing of the next music-making action. Yes, a fluid practice performance that demonstrates the harmonious integration of the elements of self, listening, reflective and reflexive practice. In essence: I listen, I practice, I reflect, I analyse, I consider, I choose, I prepare to act, I act – almost instantaneously and/or simultaneously.
This Project 1 Pilot Study has been a personal journey of creative and research practice, highlighting the co-constituted nature of my music-making practice. I now engage in the process of music-making in pursuit of authentic expression of self, irrespective of the medium. My authentic music-making practice – in contrast to my practice prior to engaging in this doctoral research – now transgresses the mediums of: physical instruments and virtual technologies. I now have a sense of who I am, what I am attempting to create, why I am attempting to create it, and an affective connection in the creation of it, irrespective of the medium of my music-making practice – physical instruments or virtual technologies. Virtual technologies are now as much an extension of my music-making practitioner self’s body, as playing my physical instrument of choice, the electric guitar. Allow me now to share my finding of this Project 1 Pilot Study – Holistic model to authentic practice – my journey and development through the four (4) phases of: identity-driven practice, value-driven practice, narrative-based practice, and embodied practice.
DCI Project 1 Model Graphic_Overview.20170607.P1c1.png
(DLP 2017f)
This blog series is planned to continue next month with Research Practitioner Part 25. It is intended for this blog series to continue on a regular basis as I progress through my doctoral research project.
References
DLP 2017a image courtesy of David L Page Project 1 Research Study Holistic Model of an Authentic Practitioner. Created 17th May, 2017
DLP 2017b image courtesy of David L Page Project 1 Research Study Holistic Model of an Authentic Practitioner. Created 17th May, 2017
DLP 2017c image courtesy of David L Page Project 1 Research Study Holistic Model of an Authentic Practitioner. Created 17th May, 2017
DLP 2017d image courtesy of David L Page Project 1 Research Study Holistic Model of an Authentic Practitioner. Created 17th May, 2017
DLP 2017e image courtesy of David L Page Project 1 Research Study Developed Praxis v9k. Created 17th May, 2017
DLP 2017f image courtesy of David L Page Project 1 Research Study Holistic Model of an Authentic Practitioner.  Created 17th May, 2017
DLP 2017c image courtesy of David L Page Project 1 Research Study Developed – Holistic Model of Authentic Practice. Created 17th May, 2017
DLP 2016a image courtesy of David L Page Project 1 Research Study Developed Praxis v5b. Created 17th May, 2017
DLP 2016b image courtesy of David L Page Project 1 Research Study Developed Praxis v8i.  Created 31st December, 2016
DLP 2015a image courtesy of David L Page. Created 14th September, 2015
DLP 2015b image courtesy of David L Page Project 1 Research Study Developed Praxis v4.  Created 4th December, 2015
Onion image courtesy of: Onion Layers Accessed 28th March, 2015
Page, David L. 2017. Doctoral Research Study Part 3 Accessed 17th May, 2017
Wiley, Norbert. 2010. “Inner speech and agency.” In Conversations about reflexivity, edited by Margaret S. Archer, 17-38. New York: Routledge
– @David L Page 17/05/2017
– updated @David L Page 30/05/2017
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

 

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Doctoral Research Study Part 3

~DLP Pro Image 1.20141020

(Page 2014a)
This blog is a continuation of a series. See here (Page 2014b) for the previous blog.
saeq-joint-logo-201309

Reflecting on 2014 ….

My approach to practice was so different to that of my recently recruited peers. As part of the creative media studies stream, learners were now to be immersed in specific creative media lexis and theory, via tasks that guided the aspiring practitioners in the development of them selves as unique and individual creative media identities. They were to learn to critically consider what creative media is for them as practitioners; researching and investigating both concepts and areas of the creative media industry they may possibly choose to engage in via their practice. They were to then apply these concepts to develop their unique creative media practice. With a developed sense of themselves, having time to form their world views, they would be guided in their development as aspiring professional practitioners; and as academic researchers.

2017 Update

I commenced the doctoral program in February 2015. My formal research journey had begun. On the back of the new acquired knowledge and approach in 2014 as described in the previous blog in this series, I implemented a new blog strategy at the beginning of 2015. This saw me changing my blog site from tumblr.com to wordpress.com. I did this for a number of reasons, but primarily due to:
  • wordpress.com is what we were guiding our learners to create as their primary creative practice blog site;
  • functionality of the wordpress.com site, including the use-friendly nature of the interface, the editing features, and the ability to publish multi-media within the one entry.
wordpress-site-20160129
(Page 2017a)
A selection of the 2014 journal entries were published retrospectively in wordpress.com as blog posts as soon as I opened that site. In revisiting this particular blog post- formerly named Reflecting Part 2 – now, nearing the end of my Project 1, I have chosen to rename some of those blog posts. Most noteworthy are:
  • my realisation that Reflecting Part 1 was essentially about my self , effectively situating my self in regard to my – at the time – pending  research study. I therefore renamed this Doctoral Research Study Part 1;
  • my realisation that Reflecting Part 2 (this blog post) was essentially about my practitioner self , effectively situating my practitioner self in regard to my – at the time – pending  research study. I therefore renamed this Doctoral Research Study Part 2.
Pre-DCI 2014 Journal Entries.20170430.P2.png
(Page 2017b)
Standing here today, reflecting, I now realise how my focus within this Project 1 was influenced by my experience within my HE education & learning role in 2013 and 2014.  The small sample of blogs I currently have listed on my wordpress.com site under the menu category DCI Phase 0 – Starting Point (Page 2017c) – are representative of some of the new knowledge and approach I acquired and developed during that period.  These journals/blogs were completed prior to my official commencement of my doctoral studies, the research study I was choosing to embark on to seek out answers to my long-term queries regarding my music practice. Yes, these blog entries represented 10,000 words book-ending the beginning of my research study.

My view of 2013 & 2014, looking back from 2017….

Reflecting from this point, I realise now how much I have developed over the course of the past almost four (4) years, in terms of new knowledge and approach. I have developed a new set of eyes in terms of my self, and as a practitioner. I look at my developed identity – self and practitioner selves – in 2017, differently to how I saw my self and my practitioner self in 2013, just under four (4) years ago. I am surprised with the level of detail I now see my self, my practitioner self, and my practice is detailed. After all, I have always actively engaged in reflection. However, two (2) key distinctions have emerged.
Firstly: I always knew I was complex; I always knew I was diverse. I now accept I am complex. I now accept I am diverse. I have a wonderfully varied and diverse life. In my need to ground my self during a period of failing creative practice (‘writers block’?), in order to re-connect to my muse, it was suggested I attempt to re-connect to my identity. As a result, I revisited a task that I have led hundreds of professional through in their professional development; I developed a Charter of Values and Beliefs for my self and practitioner self across my Project 1. Three (3) versions over the course of sixteen (16) months. I noted a summary of these developments in my blog last month:
“Quantifiably, the development across the three (3) versions of the Charter of Values and Beliefs over the sixteen (16) months of Project 1 has been:
v1: 26 green entries – new entries – under 8 categories
v2: 55 entries under 10 categories (112% growth in entries)
v3:  87 entries under 11 categories (58% growth in entries)” (Page 2017d)
Viewing this blog in the graphic below – where v1 is column 1, v2 is column 2, and v3 is column 3  – the level of development across the sixteen (16) months is exemplified (see Research Practitioner Part 18 Page 2017d for greater detail of this chart):.
Charter of Values development v3_v10_13.20170320.P1
(Page 2017e)
Secondly: I acknowledged early in my Project 1 journey that I realised I was a multi-disciplinary practitioner (see Research Practitioner Part 5):
“I began to recognise that I naturally took a multi-discplinary approach in not only my music practice, but in my life in general. I recall few times in my life where I was content to focus on one discipline for an extended period of time. I have accepted that my practice now covers three broad disciplines: a broad definition of music practice (Small 1998), education and learning practice, and my most recent engagement, research practice” (Page 2016).
As per my blog Research Practitioner Part 16 in January (Page 2017f), this passage of time has also provided me an opportunity to realise I am a multi-facetted, multi-dimensional practitioner. Based on evidenced practice-led data, I have documented at various point in my journey multiple instances of how my self informs my practice; and how my practice inform my self.
reflection
Reflecting thus far,  I realise how I immersed my self into this research study, a creative project opportunity that has provided me reflections of my self, and of my practitioner self. I can see with more clarity who I am as a unique and individual creative media identity.  I have critically considered how I choose to engage in creative media – what motivates me – as a practitioner. I have researched and investigated how I engaged in my unique creative media practice. In doing so, I have left no stone unturned. Having crystallised my world view, with a developed sense of my self, I was then able to guide my own development via conscious, deliberate and systematic reflective and reflexive practice of my creative practice, as a professional practitioner; and as an academic researcher.
Yes, much like Bilbo Baggins (Bros 2014) I am grateful in retrospect, for the opportunity to go on the journey into what was largely unknown territory for me – academic research. It was a self-imposed intervention process in many ways, to look at my creative practice through a very different set of eyes than I had previously. I stepped forward out of my comfort zone, and put just about every facet of my practice under the microscope. I was the subject; and I was the observer.  At points I thought I was going out of my mind, observing my practitioner self in the midst of practice, trying to conduct two roles at once. I faced large droughts of creativity, playing with session files for hours on end, and yet not connecting at all to the music I was making. When i finally did connect, i experienced quite the complete opposite situation. All of a sudden I felt I was drowning in a mass of data – electronic and paper notes, creative doodles, mindmaps, charts, textural, theoretical and methodological literature, session files, microphones, recording equipment, software updates, and an increasing list of potential blogs – my attempts to narrate my journey as I progressed. As I near the end of Project 1, and attempt to further streamline my findings, into an exegesis, i immerse my self more into the journey it has been to date.  What a journey to date. Once I submit this document, I can then embark on the next Project this research study journey. I can’t imagine what is install for that next leg.

images

 (Terry-Toons Comics 1945-1951)
This blog series is planned to continue next month with Research Practitioner Part 23 (Page 2017g). It is intended for this blog series to continue on a regular basis as I progress through my doctoral research project.
References
Bros, Warner. 2014. “The Hobbit.” Accessed 26th December, 2014
Learning Philosophy image courtesy of:  Learning Accessed 25th December 2014
Page, David L. 2017a. David L Page wordpress.com site Accessed 15th May 2017
Page, David L. 2017b. Revised DLP Blog Category Topics Accessed 15th May 2017
Page, David L. 2017c. DCI Phase 0 Starting Point Accessed 15th May 2017
Page, David L 2017d. Research Practitioner Part 18  Accessed 15th May 2017
DLP 2017e. image courtesy of Data for DLPs Project 1_Music and Sonic Collage.20170529.v39 Accessed 15th May 2017
Page, David L. 2017f. Research Practitioner Part 16 Accessed 15th May 2017
Page, David L. 2017g. Research Practitioner Part 23 Accessed 15th May 2017
Page, David L. 2016 Research Practitioner Part 5 Accessed 15th May 2017
Page, David L. 2015. A Creative Artist’s Need – Gratitude Accessed 15th May 2017
Page, David L. 2014a image courtesy of David L Page Linked-In site  Accessed 25th December, 2014
Page, David L. 2014b. Doctoral Research Study Part 2  Accessed 15th May 2017
Reflection image courtesy of: Reflection Accessed 15th May 2017
Terry-Toons Comics. 1945-1951. Mighty Mouse in Mighty Mouse #38-85  Accessed 8th March, 2014.
– @David L Page 15/05/2017
– update @David L Page 17/06/2017
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

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Research Practitioner Part 18

Doctorate of Creative Industries Project 1

research

(Research 2016)

Precis

Continuing on from my previous blogs in this series; as I am now into my third year of my post-graduate academic research study,  I felt motivated to revisit and develop my values, goals and beliefs for both my self and my music practice. It is now early- Year 3, with the pending significant milestone being the completion of my Doctoral Research Study Project 1.  You will note in the following blog, the considerable insight I have gained into both my self and my practice over the past three (3) to four (4) months since my last blog post – Charter of Values and Beliefs v2 , on the 28th November 2016.
The Art of self-reflection
(Self Reflection 2016)

Opening remarks

Over the course of the past sixteen (16) months, I have gained new levels of understanding and clarity about my self and practice. The most notable development to the Year 2 (2016) Charter of Values and Beliefs v2 was over a three (3) to four (4) month period from November 2016 to the near end of February 2017. In living my very busy life across full-time employment, research study commitments, creative practice, professional consulting practice and family responsibilities, I noticed I was no longer just restricting my research study observations of my creative practice, but I was now observing how my self was engaging in my multiple forms of practice. It was as though the many forms of practice I had previously treated as quite separate entities, suddenly were being seen through a lens as one of the same thing: a multi-discplinary practice. In realising what was occurring, in January 2017 I recorded my observations in the blog the multi-facetted/multi-dimensional practitioner (Page 2017).
DLPs Multi-faceted Practitioner.20170212.P4
(Page 2017a)
Over the course of this period (from v2 to v3), I broadened the term I refer to my practitioner self from music practitioner to a more holistic view to that of, creative practitioner. From that point in time, the manner in which I now saw my self and my practice has been very much through a non-disciplinary specific – or perhaps a multi-discplinary lens. This illumination was for me, profound. I developed my Charter of Values and Beliefs v3 , and now consider this to be exponentially more aligned with my self and my practitioner self, irrespective of my form of practice I am engaging in at any point in time. Over the course of this period, I broadened the term I refer to my practitioner self, from music practitioner to creative practitioner; to now that of only, practitioner. I am a practitioner across many industries, fields, disciplines and sites. All of my practice informs my self; and my self informs my practice – irrespective of the industry, the field, the discipline, or the site.
Phase 3_14th Observation.P14c.png
(Page 2017b)
The chart below visually shows (left column is v1, middle column is v2, right column in v3) the degree of development of my Charter of Values and Beliefs from v1 (green lines = new entries, and grey lines = no entry), to v2 (white lines = same entry as previously made in v1, green lines = new entries, and yellow entries = a development of a previous green entry), to v3.
Charter of Values development v3_v10_13.20170320.P1
(Page 2017c)
Quantifiably, the development across the three (3) versions of the Charter of Values and Beliefs over the sixteen (16) months of Project 1 has been:
v1: 26 green entries – new entries – under 8 categories
v2: 55 entries under 10 categories (112% growth in entries)
  • 24 white entries (previous existing entries with NO change)
  • 1 yellow entry (development of previous existing entries) [4% change in previous existing entries]
  • 30 green entries (new entries, or complete re-write/change to previous existing)  [115% growth in new entries]
v3:  87 entries under 11 categories (58% growth in entries)
  • 19 white entries (previous existing entries with NO change) [35% of v2 total]
  • 36 yellow entries (development of previous existing entries) [65% of v2 total]
  • 32 green entries (new entries, or complete re-write/change to previous existing) [106% growth in new entries]
However, whilst the quantifiable number of entries demonstrates the volume of change, it is only when you engage in each and every entry, that you can begin to understand the significance of the development from v2 to v3 of the Charter of Values and Beliefs. It is in the quality – the depth and breadth – of these new (green) entries, and the revised (yellow) entries.  I welcome you to engage in my findings that I believe reveals a more aligned self with my practice; with my multi-facetted, multi-dimensional, multi-disciplinary practitioner self; my authentic self.

~DLP Pro Image 1.20141020

(DLP 2016a)

DLP’s Charter of Values and Beliefs v3

onion-layers

Year 1 Research Study Part 1a – who I know I am now

1a. Self: N/A [Value]. N/A [Goal]. I believe self as being central/core to my being [Belief].
1b. Self: In life, I value a phenomenological approach to life – to experience, to learn and to continually develop knowledge and skills. (Just about) Every person has the capacity (ability) to learn – to experience, to learn and to continually develop knowledge and skills (eg: think learning to baby talk, crawl, talk, walk, converse, function at home, go to school, etc) [Value]. I strive to maintain a phenomenological approach to life – to experience, to learn and to continually develop my knowledge and skills. (Just about) Every person has the capacity (ability) to learn – to experience, to learn and to continually develop knowledge and skills (eg: think learning to baby talk, crawl, talk, walk, converse, function at home, go to school, etc) [Goal]. I take a phenomenological approach to life – to experience, to learn and to continually develop my knowledge and skills. (Just about) Every person has the capacity (ability) to learn – to experience, to learn and to continually develop knowledge and skills (eg: think learning to baby talk, crawl, talk, walk, converse, function at home, go to school, etc) [Belief].
1c. Self: I value an empirical evidentiary approach to life – a physical and sensory experience – gaining knowledge by means of my senses, particularly that of observation and experimentation [Value]. I strive to gain knowledge by means of my senses, particularly that of observation and experimentation [Goal]. I gain knowledge most effectively and efficiently by means of my senses, particularly that of observation and experimentation [Belief].
1d. Self: In life I value authenticity [Value]. I aspire to being authentic in life, living true to my values and beliefs [Goal]. I believe I live to a high degree of authenticity in life, living true to my values and beliefs [Belief] [see *Note below].
1e. Self: In life, I value a spiritual approach to life – to develop understanding, respect and acceptance of self [Value]. I strive to maintain spiritual balance within my life – to develop understanding, respect and acceptance of self [Goal]. We are spiritual beings, engaging in a human experience. My human journey is to resolve the limitations, contradictions and inconsistencies of being human – to experience, to learn, and to develop understanding, respect and acceptance of self – and to engage congruently within the physical world [Belief] [see *Note below].
1f. Self: I value a holistic perspective of self, with consideration of the many facets and dimension that each person possesses [Belief]. I strive to see a holistic perspective of self, looking for the many facets and dimensions that each person possesses [Goal]. In life, I accept a holistic perspective of self, revealing the many facets and dimensions that each person possesses [Belief].
1g. Self: In life I value self-reliance [Value]. I aspire to being self-reliant in life [Goal]. I am self-reliant in life, but choose to be, or not to be, as I see appropriate [Belief] [see *Note above].
1h. Self: I value inner speech to guide the self [Value]. I strive to develop my inner speech to act as a more effective inner guide the self [Goal]. I have developed my inner speech to act as a more effective inner guide the self [Belief].
 1i. Self: In life, I value the conscious pursuit of the development of self and identity – exploring one’s narrative – in order to align to one’s purpose [Value]. I consciously strive to in the development of self and identity – exploring one’s narrative – in order to align to one’s purpose [Goal]. I consciously strive in the development of self and identity – exploring one’s narrative – in order to align to one’s purpose. I now possess a clearer view of who I am as a person, and what my purpose is [Belief].
1j. Self: I value the triadic voices of the dialogic self that guide the self across time – ‘the I, the me, and the you’ [Value].  I strive to develop the triadic voices of the dialogic self that guide the self across time – ‘the I, the me, and the you’ [Goal]. I have developed the triadic voices of the dialogic self that guide the self across time – ‘the I, the me, and the you’ [Belief]
1k. Self: In life, I value an embodied approach to life: an immersive physical and sensory experience with physical connection to tools or process [Value]. I strive to exercise an embodied approach: an immersive physical and sensory experience with physical connection to tools or process [Goal]. I exercise an embodied approach in practice: an immersive physical and sensory experience with physical connection to tools or process [Belief]. I am a physical being – a tactile being, a kinaesthetic being, a sensual being that chooses to tools or process [Belief].
1l. Self: In life, I value affective connection [Value]. I strive to be affectively connected [Goal]. I am an affected being [Belief] [see *Note above].
1m. Self: In life, I value balance [Value]. I strive to be balanced, to be a balanced, functional human being – affective, expressive and communicative – spiritually, physically and mentally [Goal]. Whilst being very busy, I have balance in my life. I am a balanced, functional human being – affective, expressive and communicative – spiritually, physically and mentally [Belief].
[*Note: though I became quite imbalanced over the last three months of 2016, by choosing to overlook the balance of my spiritual, physical and mental being. I am happy to report though, this balance has mostly returned by the close of the year].
1n. Self: In life, I value diversity of orientation [Value]. I am very end product/goal-orientated with actions; and I also very process-orientated with expression and reflection [Goal]. Being contrast orientated, I have a great opportunity in life. I believe I am target-orientated and effective and efficient in realising personal goals: I believe I do not waiver from my focus. However along the journey, I believe I am process-orientated in my expression and reflection. I believe I immerse my self in the process [Belief].
1o. Self: In life, I value an open intellect/mindfulness [Value]. I strive to approach life with an open and inquiring mind [Goal]. I approach most aspects of my life with an open and inquiring mind, applying thought and mindfulness [Belief].
1p. Self: In life, I value joy [Value]. I strive to be connected to joy and happiness [Goal]. I am a joyful being [Belief] [see *Note above].
1q. Self: I value a sincere and deep level of engagement with others [Value]. I aspire to engaging with others in a sincere way, and to a deep level of engagement with others [Goal]. I engage with others in a sincere way, and to a deep level of engagement with others – in a genuine and congruent manner [Belief] [see *Note above].
1r. Self: I value nurturing as a human quality [Value]. I aspire to be a nurturing soul [Goal]. I am a nurturing soul [Belief] [see *Note above].

onion-layers

Year 1 Research Study Part 1b – who I know I am now as a practitioner

2a. Self & Practice: N/A [Value]. N/A [Goal]. I believe the practitioner self is central/core to my practice [Belief].
2b. Self & Practice: I value a phenomenological approach to practice – to experience, to learn and to continually develop knowledge and skills [Value]. I strive to maintain a phenomenological approach to practice – to experience, to learn and to continually develop my knowledge and skills [Goal]. I take a phenomenological approach to practice – to experience, to learn and to continually develop my knowledge and skills [Belief].
2c. Self & Practice: I value an empirical evidentiary approach to practice – sense experience, gaining knowledge by means of my senses, particularly that of observation and experimentation [Value]. In practice, I strive to gain knowledge by means of my senses, particularly that of observation and experimentation [Goal]. I believe I gain knowledge most effectively and efficiently in practice by means of my senses, particularly that of observation and experimentation [Belief].
2d. Self & Practice: In practice I value authenticity, maintaining alignment to my values and beliefs [Value]. I aspire to being authentic in my practice, being true to my values and beliefs, maintaining alignment to my values and beliefs [Goal]. I believe I demonstrate a high degree of authenticity in my practice, maintaining alignment to my values and beliefs [Belief].
2e. Self & Practice: I value a holistic perspective of the practitioner self, with consideration of the many facets and dimension that each practitioner possesses [Belief]. I strive to see a holistic perspective of the practitioner self, looking for the many facets and dimensions that each practitioner possesses [Goal]. I accept a holistic perspective of the practitioner self, revealing the many facets and dimensions that each practitioner possesses [Belief].
2f. Self & Practice: In practice I value self-reliance [Value]. I aspire to being self-reliant in my practice [Goal]. I am self-reliant in my practice, but choose to be, or not to be, as I see appropriate [Belief] [see *Note above].
2g. Self & Practice: In practice, I value inner speech to guide the practitioner self [Value]. In practice, I strive to develop my inner speech to act as a more effective inner guide the practitioner self [Goal]. In practice, I have developed my inner speech to act as a more effective inner guide the practitioner self [Belief].
2h. Self & Practice: In practice, I value the conscious pursuit of the development of practitioner self and identity – exploring one’s narrative – in order to align to one’s purpose [Value]. I consciously strive in the development of my practitioner self and identity – exploring one’s narrative – in order to align to one’s purpose [Goal]. I consciously strive in the development of my practitioner self and identity – exploring one’s narrative – in order to align to one’s purpose. I now possess a clearer view of who I am as a practitioner, and what my purpose is [Belief].
2i. Self & Practice: I value the triadic voices of the dialogic self that guides the practitioner self across time – ‘the I, the me, and the you’ in practice [Value]. I strive to develop the triadic voices of the dialogic self that guides the practitioner self across time – ‘the I, the me, and the you’ in my practice [Goal]. I have developed the triadic voices of the dialogic self that guides the practitioner self across time – ‘the I, the me, and the you’ in my practice [Belief].
2j. Self & Practice: I value an embodied approach to practice: an immersive physical and sensory experience with physical connection to the practice – tools or process [Value]. I strive to exercise an embodied approach to practice: an immersive physical and sensory experience with physical connection to the practice – tools or process [Goal]. I exercise an embodied approach in practice: an immersive physical and sensory experience with physical connection to the practice – tools or process [Belief]. I am a physical being – a tactile being, a kinaesthetic being, a sensual being that chooses to engage in the practice – tools or process [Belief].
2k. Self & Practice: I value a high volume of post-training practice (10,000 hours) in order to develop a professional level of knowledge and skill in that practice [Value]. In any form of new practice I choose to learn, I set the goal on 10,000 hours of post-training practice in order to develop a professional level of knowledge and skill in that practice [Goal]. The forms of practice I have developed a professional level of knowledge and skill in, is the result of having invested 10,000 hours of post-training practice [Belief].
2l. Self & Practice: I value a high standard of practice [Value]. I aspire to execute a high standard of practice within the various forms of practice I engage in [Goal]. I believe I operate at a high standard of practice within the various forms of practice I engage in [Belief].
2m. Self & Practice: Further to 2c above, I value a multi-faceted/multi-dimensional approach to practice [Value]. I aspire to execute a multi-faceted/multi-dimensional approach within the various forms of practice I engage in [Goal]. I execute a multi-faceted/multi-dimensional approach to practice, within the various forms of practice I engage in [Belief].
2n. Self & Practice: I value diversity of orientation in my practice [Value]. I am very end product/goal-orientated with actions; and I also very process-orientated with expression and reflection [Goal]. Being contrast orientated, I have a great opportunity in life. I believe I am target-orientated, effective and efficient in realising goals within the various forms of practice I engage in: I believe I do not waiver from the output focus for that practice. However within my various forms of practice, I believe I immerse my self in the process of practice with my expression and reflection [Belief] [see *Note above].
 2o. Self & Practice: In practice, I value spontaneity (being spontaneous = freedom for DLP) [Value]. In my practice, I aspire to spontaneously – effortlessly, naturally – alter my practice as I see fit/appropriate [Goal]. I operate in a spontaneous manner – effortlessly, naturally – within the various forms of practice I engage in [Belief].
2p. Self & Practice: In practice, I value being prepared [Value]. I aspire to being prepared in all situations of my practice, facilitating optimum engagement and maximizing the opportunity of an optimum experience for others [Goal]. I prepare thoroughly for my practice, facilitating optimum engagement and maximizing the opportunity of an optimum experience for others. I believe such preparation is an integral part of the practice process [Belief] [see *Note above].
2q. Self & Practice: In practice, I value appearing to be in a relaxed state [Value]. I aspire to appearing to be in a relaxed state in all situations, enabling the execution of what appears to be an effortless/natural/automatic high level of practice; in turn facilitating optimum engagement and maximizing the opportunity of an optimum experience for others [Goal]. I prepare thoroughly for my practice, prior to practice, in order to be in a relaxed stated at the time of public practice (ie the performance). Being in this state in turn facilitates optimum engagement and maximizes the opportunity of an optimum experience for others. I believe such a relaxed state in public performance is a key element of the practice process [Belief][see *Note above].
2r. Self & Practice: I value practice that provides opportunities for nurturing [Value]. I aspire to practice that provides opportunities to nurture (both my self and others)[Goal]. I engage in practice that provides opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Belief] [see *Note above].

onion-layers

Year 1 Research Study Part 1c – who I know I am as a practitioner

3a. Social and Cultural contexts: I value social and cultural diversity [Value]. I strive to live across a very wide and broad range of social and cultural contexts – countries and cultures in my life [Goal]. I embrace a very wide and broad range of of social and cultural contexts – countries and cultures in my life [Belief].
3b. Social and Cultural contexts: I value equal opportunity for all – irrespective of gender, race, sexual preference, impairment [Value]. I strive to provide equitable levels of service and practice for all – irrespective of gender, race, sexual preference, impairment [Goal]. I assist people by providing equitable levels of service and practice for all – irrespective of gender, race, sexual preference, impairment [Belief].
3c. Social and Cultural contexts: I value opportunity for all for learning and development to navigate their life  – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… (what I refer to as “community education”) [Value].  I strive to assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life –  their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community education”) [Goal].I assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community education”) [Belief].
3d. Social and Cultural contexts: I value opportunities in contexts that provide opportunities for nurturing [Value]. I aspire to practice in contexts that provides opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Goal]. I engage in practice in contexts which provides opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Belief].

~DLP Pro Image Fun 5b small.20141020

(DLP 2016b)

Year 1 Research Study Part 1d – who I know I am as a creative practitioner

4a. Creative practice: In my creative practice I value authenticity [Value]. I aspire to being authentic in my creative practice, maintaining alignment to my values and beliefs [Goal]. I believe I demonstrate a high degree of authenticity in my creative practice, maintaining alignment to my values and beliefs [Belief].
 4b. Creative practice: I value the conscious pursuit of the development of self and identity – exploring one’s narrative – in order to align one’s purpose to one’s creative practice [Value]. I consciously strive in the development of self and identity – exploring one’s narrative – in order to align to one’s purpose to one’s creative practice [Goal]. I consciously strive in the development of self and identity – exploring one’s narrative – in order to align to one’s purpose to one’s creative practice. I now possess a clearer view of who I am as a person, and what my purpose is [Belief].
4c. Creative practice: I value diversity of orientation in my creative practice [Value]. I strive to exercise both a goal-orientation (product), and a process-orientation (process) with my creative practice [Goal]. Being contrast orientated, there is a great opportunity in my creative practice. I believe my target-orientation allows me to effectively and efficiently realise goals for my creative practice, not wavering from the output focus – the product – for that creative practice. However within my creative practice, I believe I immerse my self in the process of the creative practice with my expression and reflection for creative benefit [Belief].
4d. Creative practice: I value social and cultural diversity of creative practice, music and sonic styles [Value]. I strive to experience and be influenced by a very wide and broad range of diversity of creative practice, music and sonic styles in my life [Goal]. I am open to experience and be influenced by a very wide and broad range of diversity of creative practice, music and sonic styles [Belief].
4e. Creative practice: I value creative practice occurring in a supportive environment or culture [Value]. I strive for my creative practice to occur in a supportive culture and environment in my life [Goal]. I facilitate my creative practice to occur in a supportive culture and environment [Belief].
4f. Creative practice: I value creative practice assisting participants to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community creative education”, “community music education”, etc) [Value]. I strive for creative practice to assist participants to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community creative education”, “community music education”, etc) [Goal]. Creative practice workshops I provide assist participants to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community creative education”, “community music education”, etc) [Belief]. My creative practice workshops assist participants to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community creative education”, “community music education”, etc) [Belief].
4g. Creative practice: I value creative practice workshops that provide opportunities for nurturing [Value]. I aspire to provide creative practice workshops that provide opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Goal]. I provide creative practice workshops that provide opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Belief]. My creative practice is engaged in a manner that is nurturing (of both my self and others) [Belief].

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Year 1 Research Study Part 1e – who I know I am as a sound-track making practitioner

5a. Composition and Performance of Narrative: I value authenticity in my composition and performance of narrative practice [Value]. I strive to maintain authenticity with my composition and performance of narrative practice, maintaining alignment to my values and beliefs [Goal]. I believe I maintain authenticity with my composition and performance of narrative practice, maintaining alignment to my values and beliefs [Belief].
5b. Composition & Performance of Narrative: I value diversity of orientation in my composition and performance of narrative practice [Value]. I strive to exercise both a goal-orientation (product), and a process-orientation (process) with my composition and performance of narrative practice [Goal]. Being contrast orientated, there is a great opportunity in my composition and performance of narrative practice. I believe my target-orientation allows me to effectively and efficiently realise goals for my composition and performance practice, not wavering from the aim and objective focus for that practice. However within that practice, I believe I immerse my self in the process of the composition and performance practice with my expression and reflection for creative benefit. I believe I am in the moment during that practice [Belief].
5c. Composition & Performance of Narrative: I value narrative compositions combining a range of music and sonic textures, appropriate to the music and sonic style, woven together in an original holistic cohesive manner [Value]. I strive to create narrative compositions combining a range of music and sonic textures, appropriate to the music and sonic style, woven together in an original holistic cohesive manner [Goal]. I integrate a range of music and sonic textures into my narrative compositions, appropriate to the music and sonic style, woven together in an original holistic cohesive manner [Belief].
5d. Composition & Performance of Narrative: I value composing and performing instrumentation and/or music and sonic elements, integrating all of the music and sonic textures together into an original holistic cohesive manner [Value]. I strive to compose and perform instrumentation and/or music and sonic elements, integrating all of the music and sonic textures together into an original holistic cohesive manner [Goal]. I compose and perform instrumentation and/or music and sonic elements, in and around other instruments, integrating all of music and sonic textures together into an original holistic cohesive manner [Belief].
5e. Composition & Performance of Narrative: I value composing and performing music and sonic narratives that are nurturing of both my self and others [Value]. I aspire to compose and perform music and sonic narratives that are nurturing of both my self and others [Goal]. I compose and perform music and sonic narratives that are nurturing of both my self and others [Belief].

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Year 2 Research Study Part 2a – who I am discovering/accepting my self to be as a professional practitioner

6a. Self and Professional Practice: In my professional practice I value authenticity [Value]. I aspire to being authentic in my professional practice, being true to my values and beliefs, maintaining alignment to my values and beliefs [Goal]. I believe I live to a high degree of authenticity in my professional practice, maintaining alignment to my values and beliefs [Belief].
6b. Self & Professional Practice: I value the conscious pursuit of the development of professional practitioner self and identity – exploring one’s narrative – in order to align to one’s purpose to the professional practice [Value]. I consciously strive in the development of my professional practitioner self and identity – exploring one’s narrative – in order to align to one’s purpose to the professional practice [Goal]. I consciously strive in the development of my professional practitioner self and identity – exploring one’s narrative – in order to align to one’s purpose to the professional practice. I now possess a clearer view of who I am as a professional practitioner, and what my professional practice purpose is [Belief].
6c. Self and Professional Practice: I value an embodied approach to professional practice: an immersive physical and sensory experience with physical connection to the professional practice – tools or process [Value]. I strive to exercise an embodied approach to professional practice: an immersive physical and sensory experience with physical connection to the professional practice – tools or process [Goal]. I exercise an embodied approach in professional practice: an immersive physical and sensory experience with physical connection to the professional practice – tools or process [Belief]. I am a physical being – a tactile being, a kinaesthetic being, a sensual being that chooses to engage in the professional practice – tools or process [Belief].
6d. Self & Professional Practice: I value diversity of orientation in my professional practice [Value]. I strive to exercise both a goal-orientation (product), and a process-orientation (process) with my professional practice [Goal]. Being contrast orientated, there is a great opportunity in professional practice. I believe my target-orientation allows me to effectively and efficiently realise goals for my professional practice, not wavering from the aim and objective focus for that practice. However within that professional practice, I believe I believe I am in the moment. I immerse my self in the process of that practice with my expression and reflection, for great benefit to both my self and my practice. [Belief].
6e. Self & Professional Practice: In my life I value reflection – conscious, deliberate, systematic, interrogative introspection in order to consider, critically analyse and appraise my self and my practice [Value]. I aspire to being reflective – conscious, deliberate, systematic, interrogative introspection in order to consider, critically analyse and appraise my self and my professional practice (creative -music, education, research, management, or governance practice) as appropriate [Goal]. I am able to be reflective – conscious, deliberate, systematic, interrogative introspection in order to consider, critically analyse and appraise my self and my professional practice (creative -music, education, research, management, or governance practice) as appropriate [Belief].
6f. Self & Professional Practice: In my life I value ongoing development – constant and never-ending reflexive practice, in order to maintain proactive development of my self and my professional practice [Value]. I aspire to ongoing development – constant and never-ending reflexive practice, in order to maintain proactive development of my self and my professional practice (creative -music, education, research, management, or governance practice) as appropriate [Goal]. I am committed to ongoing development – constant and never-ending reflexive practice, in order to maintain proactive development of my self and my professional practice (creative -music, education, research, management, or governance practice) as appropriate [Belief].
6g. Self & Professional Practice: I value varied motives of professional practice [Value]. I practice professionally due to many varied motivations [Goal]. I practice professionally as a result of:
  • Discovery (to use creative practice as a medium for exploring, attempting to do something which you haven’t done previously)
  • Technically (to technically develop one’s skills)
  • Social (to connect to others)
  • Affectively (to express or connect to emotion)
  • Aesthetically (for expression or engagement in something artistic or of beauty)
  • Creatively (for action, just to do)
  • Physical (for physical expression, for exercise]
  • Commercial (for income generation purposes)
  • Educational (to demonstrate specific practice to my students, live or in preparation)
  • Cathartic (for self-development or intervention purposes. For me to connect with my emotions – to notice, to reflect, to acknowledge the emotion, and their significance, to work through that emotional experience – to deal with specific and/or significant events, and hopefully in doing so, move beyond certain emotions associated with these significant events, developing my self)
  • Performance (to maximise my performance standard, and what others get to see of me/ practice)
  • Nurturing (core to my Charter of Values is nurturing – nurturing of self and others. I demonstrate this motive in my education and learning practice; nurturing of others (eg when I am performing either as an artist, or as a producer) and nurturing of my self (when I am performing to/for my self) in my creative practice; and nurturing of my self (eg when I am reflecting) in my research practice [Belief].
6h. Self & Professional Practice: I value nurturing of my self and others – across my areas of my professional practice (creative – music, education, research, management, or governance practice) [Value]. I aspire to be a nurturing being – of my self and others – across my areas of my professional practice (creative -music, education, research, management, or governance practice) as appropriate [Goal]. I am a nurturing being – of my self and others – across my areas of my professional practice (creative – music, education, research, management, or governance practice)  – a social carer, an encourager, a coach, a mentor, an educator, a friend…. as appropriate [Belief].

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Year 2 Research Study Part 2b – who I am discovering/accepting my self to be as a creative practitioner

7a. Self & Creative Practice: As a contemporary creative practitioner, I value practice across all of the eight (8) stages of creative practice: everyday practice, creating the narrative, composing the narrative, performing the narrative, pre-production planning, producing the music and sonic narrative, post-production polishing, and distributing the narrative [Value]. As a contemporary creative practitioner, I strive to practice across all of the eight (8) stages of creative practice: everyday practice, creating the narrative, composing the narrative, performing the narrative, pre-production planning, producing the music and sonic narrative, post-production polishing, and distributing the narrative [Goal]. As a contemporary creative practitioner, I practice across all of the eight (8) stages of creative practice: everyday practice, creating the narrative, composing the narrative, performing the narrative, pre-production planning, producing the music and sonic narrative, post-production polishing, and distributing the narrative [Belief].
7b. Self & Creative Practice: I value creative practice – the composing and performing of music and sonic narratives – motivated by a diversity of intentions – the majority of which are non-commercial [Value]. I strive to engage in creative practice – the composing and performing of music and sonic narratives – motivated by a diversity of intentions in my life – the majority of which are non-commercial [Goal]. I engage in creative practice – the composing and performing of music and sonic narratives – motivated by a diversity of intentions – the majority of which are non-commercial such as:
  • Discovery (to use creative practice as a medium for exploring, attempting to do something which you haven’t done previously)
  • Technically (to use creative practice as a medium to practice one’s craft, and technically develop one’s craft skills)
  • Social (to use creative practice as a medium for social interaction purposes, to connect to others [communicative])
  • Affectively (to use creative practice as a medium to express or connect to emotion)
  • Aesthetically (to use creative practice as a medium for expression or engagement in something artistic or of beauty)
  • Creatively (to use creative practice as a medium for action, just to do [expressivity])
  • Physical (to use creative practice as a medium for physical expression, for exercise]
  • Commercial (to use creative practice as a medium for income generation purposes)
  • Educational (to demonstrate specific creative practice to my students, live or in preparation)
  • Cathartic (self-development or intervention purposes. For me to connect with my emotions – to notice, to reflect, to acknowledge the emotion, and their significance, to work through that emotional experience – to deal with specific and/or significant events, and hopefully in doing so, move beyond certain emotions associated with these significant events, developing my self)
  • Performance (where my primary motive is to perform, and therefore all creation and creative development is built upon wanting to maximise my performance standard, and what others get to see of me/my art/my creative practice
  • Nurturing (core to my Charter of Values is nurturing – nurturing of self and others. I demonstrate this motive in my education & learning practice; nurturing of others (eg when I am performing either as an artist, or as a producer) and nurturing of my self (when I am performing to/for my self) in my creative practice; and nurturing of my self (eg when I am reflecting) in my research practice [Belief].
7c. Self & Creative Practice: I value music and sonic narratives primarily for their affective, expressive and communicative qualities [Value]. I strive to perform and compose music and sonic narrative primarily for their affective, expressive and communicative qualities [Goal]. I perform and compose music and sonic narrative primarily for their affective, expressive and communicative qualities [Belief].
7d. Self & Creative Practice: I value embodied creative practice, connecting affectively to the linguistic, music and sonic narratives irrespective of the technology that is used to create such cultural productions [Value]. I strive to exercise embodied creative practice – to connect affectively to the linguistic, music and sonic narratives irrespective of the technology that is used to create such cultural productions [Goal]. I more effectively and efficiently exercise embodied creative practice. I understand how I connect affectively to my linguistic music and sonic narratives, irrespective of the technology that is used to create such cultural productions [Belief]. I understand that for me to exercise embodied creative practice, I necessarily engage in deep reflective practice: in-situate, re-experiencing the experience – generated creative writing. In doing this, I realize a core of authenticity – of affective connectedness to the linguistic, music and sonic narratives, irrespective of the technology that I use to create such cultural productions [Belief].
7e. Self & Creative Practice: I value creating music and sonic narratives that I have an affective connectedness to. I value these narratives more, when I draw on deep reflective practice – in-situate, re-experiencing the experience – in order to generate an associative memory-based narrative whilst I am in the moment of the creative process, to maximize the affective connection of the product outcome/artifact. [Value]. I strive to create music and sonic narratives that I have an affective connectedness to. I aim to do this by drawing on deep reflective practice – in-situate, re-experiencing the experience – in order to generate an associative memory-based narrative whilst I am in the moment of the creative process, to maximize the affective connection of the product outcome/artifact [Goal]. I create music and sonic narratives that I have an affective connectedness to. I do this by drawing on deep reflective practice – in-situate, re-experiencing the experience – in order to generate an associative memory-based narrative whilst I am in the moment of the creative process, to maximize the affective connection of the product outcome/artifact [Belief].
7f. Self & Creative Practice: I value commencing the creative process using one of the forms of: narrative, prose or song lyrics [Value]. I intuitively commence creative practice using one of the forms of: narrative, prose or song lyrics [Goal]. I intuitively commence the creative process by using one of the forms of: narrative, prose or song lyrics [Belief].
7g. Self & Creative Practice: I value creative practice of a range of cultural origins, based on a diversity of interest, observation and experience [Value]. I strive for my creative practice to extend across of a range of cultural origins, based on a diversity of interest, observation and experience [Goal]. My creative practice extends across a range of cultural origins, based on a diversity of interest, observation and experience [Belief].
7h. Self & Creative Practice: I value the practice of listening to music and sonic narratives on any of the three levels: holistic, associative, or critical and analytical listening [Value]. I strive to practice listening to music and sonic narratives on any of the three levels: holistic, associative, and critical and analytical listening [Goal]. I practice listening to music and sonic narratives on all of the three levels: holistic, associative, and critical and analytical listening [Belief].

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Year 2 Research Study Part 2c – who I am discovering/accepting myself to be as a creative practitioner

8a. Self & Creative Practice: I value creative practice of music and sonic narratives, which extends across diverse technologies, to influence the cultural production outcome [Value]. I strive for my creative practice of music and sonic narratives to extend across diverse technologies, to influence the cultural production outcome [Goal]. My creative practice of music and sonic narratives extends across diverse technologies, to influence the cultural production outcome [Belief].
8b. Self & Creative Practice: Intuitively, I value physical music and sonic narrative technologies that emit vibrations and resonances; of a style and size I can physically embrace and/or engage in [Value]. I intuitively seek a range of physical music and sonic narrative technologies that emit vibrations and resonances; of a style and size I can physically embrace and/or engage in. These technologies are to become extensions of my self [Goal]. I intuitively seek and engage in/play a range of physical music and sonic narrative technologies that emit vibrations and resonances; of a style and size I can physically embrace and/or engage in. These generally become extensions of my self [Belief].
8c. Self & Creative practice: I now also value physical music and sonic narrative technologies, which don’t necessarily emit vibrations and resonances; of a style and size I may not necessarily be able to physically embrace and/or engage in [Value]. I now seek a range of physical music and sonic narrative technologies, which don’t necessarily emit vibrations and resonances; of a style and size I may not necessarily be able to physically embrace and/or engage in. These technologies are to become extensions of my self [Goal]. I now seek and engage in/play a range of physical music and sonic narrative technologies, which don’t necessarily emit vibrations and resonances; of a style and size I can physically embrace and/or engage in. These are now becoming extensions of my self [Belief].
8d. Self & Creative Practice: I value creative practice of music and sonic narratives which extend across diverse sites, where one site’s practice influences and/or informs other forms of practice in other sites; to influence the cultural production outcome [Value].I strive for my creative practice of music and sonic narratives to extend across diverse sites, where one site’s practice influences and/or informs other forms of practice in other sites; to influence the cultural production outcome [Goal]. My creative practice of music and sonic narratives extends across diverse sites, where one site’s practice influences and/or informs other forms of practice in other sites such as studio performance; which in turn can influence and inform other forms of practice such as live performance; to influence the cultural production outcome [Belief].
8e. Self & Creative Practice: I value creative practice of music and sonic narratives, which extend across a range of holistic work practice, including composition of songs and soundtracks, to influence the cultural production outcome [Value]. I strive for my creative practice of music and sonic narratives to extend across a range of holistic work practice, including composition of songs and soundtracks, to influence the cultural production outcome [Goal]. My creative practice of music and sonic narratives extends across a range of holistic work practice, including composition of songs and soundtracks, to influence the cultural production outcome [Belief].
8f. Self & Creative Practice: I value creative practice of music and sonic narratives, which extend across diverse (micro) workflows, to influence the cultural production outcome [Value]. I strive for my creative practice of music and sonic narratives to extend across diverse (micro) workflows, to influence the cultural production outcome [Goal]. My creative practice of music and sonic narratives extends across diverse (micro) workflows, to influence the cultural production outcome [Belief]. 

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Year 2 Research Study Part 2d – who I am discovering/accepting my self to be as a sound-track making practitioner

9a. Technology used for the Composition & Performance of Narrative: I value a diversity of technology – analogue, digital or digital virtual devices – in the practice of – creation and layering of – music and sonic textures in the composition and performance of narrative [Value]. I strive to engage in my creative practice a diversity of technology – analogue, digital or digital virtual devices – in the practice of – creation and layering of – music and sonic textures in the composition and performance of narrative [Goal]. I now – with confidence – engage in a diversity of technology – analogue, digital or digital virtual devices – in the practice of – creation and layering of – music and sonic textures in the composition and performance of narrative. I have developed a diversity of technology that I access and engage in, in the creation and layering of music and sonic textures in my composition and performance of narrative [Belief].
9b. Technology used for the Composition & Performance of Narrative: I value the incorporation of acoustic style instruments and their specific timbres; and the manipulation of at-the-time generated or pre-recorded sound sources for creative practice purposes; in cultural productions [Value]. I strive to incorporate acoustic style instruments and their specific timbres; and the manipulation of at-the-time generated or pre-recorded sound sources for creative practice purposes, in cultural productions  [Goal]. I incorporate acoustic style instruments and their specific timbres; and the manipulation of at-the-time generated or pre-recorded sound sources for creative practice purposes, in cultural productions  [Belief]. I have developed my live/studio technology (rig) to facilitate the manipulation and layering of music and sonic textures, and duplicate these irrespective of location – in both live and studio settings for cultural productions  [Belief].
9c. Technology used for the Composition & Performance of Narrative: I value the manipulation and layering of music and sonic textures to be duplicable equally in live and studio settings. I value a performance rig that facilitates sourcing these music and sonic textures irrespective of site (stage or studio) at any moment in time [Value]. I strive to manipulate and layer music and sonic textures that are duplicable equally in live and studio settings. I strive for my performance rig to facilitate sourcing these music and sonic textures irrespective of site (stage or studio) at any moment in time [Goal]. I manipulate and layer music and sonic textures that are duplicable equally in live and studio settings. My performance rig facilitates sourcing these music and sonic textures irrespective of site (stage or studio) at any moment in time [Belief].
9d. Technology used for the Composition & Performance of Narrative: I value a diversity of technology used for the composition & performance of narrative, that influences the cultural production outcome [Value]. I strive to use a diversity of technology in the composition & performance of narrative process, to influence the cultural production outcome [Goal]. I use a diversity of technology in the composition & performance of narrative process, to influence the cultural production outcome [Belief].

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Year 2 Research Study Part 2e – who I am discovering/accepting my self to be as a creative practitioner

10a. Creative Practitioner: I value creative practitioners who aspire to create cultural production as a personal narrative, conscious it is technology of their self [Value]. I intuitively strive to be a creative practitioner who aspires to create cultural production as a personal narrative, conscious it is technology of their self [Goal]. I believe I am a creative practitioner who aspires to create cultural production as a personal narrative, conscious it is technology of my self [Belief].
10b. Creative Practitioner: I value holistic authentic creative practitioners – an identity-driven, value-driven, narrative-based, embodied practitioner [Value]. I aspire to being a holistic authentic creative practitioner – an identity-driven, value-driven, narrative-based, embodied practitioner [Goal]. I believe I am now a holistic authentic creative practitioner – an identity-driven, value-driven, narrative-based, embodied practitioner [Belief].
10c. Creative practice: I value the conscious pursuit of the development of one’s practitioner self and identity – exploring one’s narrative – in order to develop as a holistic authentic creative practitioner [Value]. I consciously strive in the development of one’s practitioner self and identity – exploring one’s narrative – in order to develop as a holistic authentic creative practitioner [Goal]. I consciously strive in the development of one’s practitioner self and identity – exploring one’s narrative – in order to develop as a holistic authentic creative practitioner. I now possess a clearer view of who I am as a person, and what my purpose is [Belief].
10d. Creative Practitioner: I value creative practice with origins in artistic expression, over creative practice solely reliant on craft expression. I value drawing on all forms of life practice – not necessarily only creative practice – in order to in order to compose or perform narratives [Value]. I strive to practice music for artistic expression, over creative practice solely for craft expression [Goal]. I strive to be an innovator, an artist, an experimental artist, a non-musician composer, a technologist producer, drawing on any technological device – analogue, digital or digital virtual devices – or otherwise – natural medium – or site – studio, outdoors or nature – in order to compose or perform narratives [Goal]. I am now practicing music for artistic expression, rather that practicing music solely for craft expression [Belief]. I am now practicing to be an innovator, an artist, an experimental artist, a non-musician composer, a technologist producer, drawing on any technological device – analogue, digital or digital virtual devices – or otherwise – natural medium – or site – studio, outdoors or nature – in order to compose or perform narratives [Belief].
10e. Creative Practitioner: I value diversity of orientation as a creative practitioner [Value]. I strive to exercise both a goal-orientation (product), and a process-orientation (process) as a creative practitioner [Goal]. Being contrast orientated, I believe there is a great opportunity as a creative practitioner. I believe my target-orientation allows me to effectively and efficiently realise goals, not wavering from the aim and objective focus of that practice. However, I believe I am in the moment as a creative practitioner, fully immersed in the process of my creative practice [Belief].
10f. Creative Practitioner:  I value a described music praxis – a framework that outlines the interdependent elements for consideration during the stages of one’s creative practice [Value]. I strive to describe my music praxis – a framework that articulates the interdependent elements for consideration during the stages of one’s creative practice [Goal]. I have developed a considered music praxis – a framework that outlines the elements for consideration during the stages of one’s creative practice. These primary elements of my Creative practice Praxis v9k 20170520 are: self, listening/hearing, decision to act, reflection/reflective practice, reflexive practice, motive, theme, song mood, decision to commence, music production approach, compositional approach, agreed reference track, music and sonic style, simple versus complex textures, technology, site, holistic work practice, micro workflow, aesthetic choices, time opportunity, and social network engagement [Belief].
10g. Creative Practitioner: I intuitively value self-reliant DIY creative practitioners who aspire to compose or perform complex textured narrative soundscapes in each and every practice session, irrespective of the interdependent elements as outlined in Praxis v9k (see below) [Value]. I intuitively strive to be a self-reliant DIY creative practitioner who aspires to compose or perform complex textured narrative soundscapes in each and every practice session, irrespective of the interdependent elements as outlined in Praxis v9k (see below) [Goal]. I am a self-reliant DIY creative practitioner who aspires to compose or perform complex textured narrative soundscapes in each and every practice session, irrespective of the interdependent elements as outlined in Praxis v9k (see below) [Belief].

DLP DCI Praxis v9i.20170420.P1

Figure I – Project 1 Research Study Developed Praxis v9k (Page 2017d)

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Year 2 Research Study Part 3 – who I have discovered and accepted my self to be as a practitioner, as a result of this Research Study, at this point in time 

11a Practitioner: I value authenticity – an authentic affective connection across all stages of practice – process and technology – across all practice [Value]. I strive to maintain being an Authentic practitioner  = maintaining an authentic affective connection across all stages of practice – process and technology – across all practice [Goal] As an authentic practitioner (holistic, embodied, value-driven, narrative-based), I engage in life to consciously, deliberately and systematically, stream my self to inform (all) practice, and (all) practice to inform my self [Belief]
(DLP 2016c)

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Significant Differences between my Project 1 end-Year 2 Charter of Values and Beliefs v2; and my early-Year 3 Charter of Values and Beliefs v3

As mentioned in my opening remarks: the quantifiable number of entries demonstrates the volume of change I made from v2 to v3 of the Charter of Values and Beliefs in the course of four to six (4 – 6) months of living my very busy life across full-time employment, research study commitments, creative practice, professional consulting practice and family responsibilities (especially relative to the previous ten to eleven month period).  However, it is only when you engage in each and every actual entry, that you can begin to understand the significance of the development from v2 to v3 of the Charter of Values and Beliefs. It is in the quality – the depth and breadth – of these new (green) entries, and the revised (yellow) entries.
A notable development to the Year 2 (2016) Charter of Values and Beliefs v2 were in the inclusions of my self-knowledge within an academic environment as I had experienced since the beginning of 2015. I felt these were key to include to broaden the scope of how I saw my self:
2b. Self & Practice:  I value a phenomenological approach to practice – to experience, to learn and to continually develop knowledge and skills;
2c. Self & Practice:  I value an empirical evidentiary approach to practice – sense experience, gaining knowledge by means of my senses, particularly that of observation and experimentation.
Other notable developments that I felt key to include to broaden the scope of how I saw my self and my practice, were the inclusions from with in my holistic approach to practice, and my developing praxis:
2a.Self & Practice: I believe the practitioner self is central/core to my practice; 
2d. Self & Practice: In practice I value authenticity, maintaining alignment to my values and beliefs;
2h. Self & Practice: In practice, I value the conscious pursuit of the development of practitioner self and identity – exploring one’s narrative – in order to align to one’s purpose;
2i. Self & Practice: I value the triadic voices of the dialogic self that guides the practitioner self across time – ‘the I, the me, and the you’ in practice;
2e. Self & Practice: I value a holistic perspective of the practitioner self, with consideration of the many facets and dimension that each practitioner possesses;
2j. Self & Practice:  I value an embodied approach to practice: an immersive physical and sensory experience with physical connection to the practice – tools or process;
2g. Self & Practice:  In practice, I value inner speech to guide the practitioner self
I also felt it was important to reiterate my approach to practice:
2k. Self & Practice: I value a high volume of post-training practice (10,000 hours) in order to develop a professional level of knowledge and skill in that practice
These were then developed across all forms of practice and specific stages of practice, broadening finally as expressions of the creative practitioner:
10a. Creative Practitioner: I value creative practitioners who aspire to create cultural production as a personal narrative, conscious it is technology of their self;
10b. Creative Practitioner: I value holistic authentic creative practitioners – an identity-driven, value-driven, narrative-based, embodied practitioner;
10c. Creative practice: I value the conscious pursuit of the development of one’s practitioner self and identity – exploring one’s narrative – in order to develop as a holistic authentic creative practitioner;
10d. Creative Practitioner: I value creative practice with origins in artistic expression, over creative practice solely reliant on craft expression. I value drawing on all forms of life practice – not necessarily only creative practice – in order to in order to compose or perform narratives;
10f. Creative Practitioner:  I value a described creative praxis – a framework that outlines the interdependent elements for consideration during the stages of one’s creative practice;
10g. Creative Practitioner: I intuitively value self-reliant DIY creative practitioners who aspire to compose or perform complex textured narrative soundscapes in each and every practice session, irrespective of the interdependent elements as outlined in Praxis v9k.
Over the course of this period (from v2 to v3), I broadened the term I refer to my practitioner self from music practitioner to a more holistic creative practitioner view. However, it was the next step that was to be the most profound. In living my very busy life, I noticed I was no longer just restricting my observations of my creative practice, but I was now observing how my self was engaging in my multiple forms of practice. It was as though the many forms of practice I had previously treated as quite separate entities, suddenly were being seen through a lens as being one of the same thing – a broad generic form of practice: a multi-disciplinary practice. I therefore revisit my Charter of Values and Beliefs v3, and added;

Year 2 Research Study Part 3 – who I have discovered and accepted my self to be as a practitioner, as a result of this Research Study, at this point in time 

11a Practitioner: I value authenticity – an authentic affective connection across all stages of practice – process and technology – across all practice [Value]. I strive to maintain being an Authentic practitioner  = maintaining an authentic affective connection across all stages of practice – process and technology – across all practice [Goal] As an authentic practitioner (holistic, embodied, value-driven, narrative-based), I engage in life to consciously, deliberately and systematically, stream my self to inform (all) practice, and (all) practice to inform my self [Belief]
From January 2017, I now see my self and my practice are very much a multi-disciplinary approach.  I now consider this Charter of Values and Beliefs v3 to be exponentially more aligned with my self and my practitioner self. I accept I am a practitioner across many industries, fields, disciplines and sites. All of my practice informs my self; and my self informs my practice – irrespective of the industry, the field, the discipline, or the site. I believe my Charter of Values and Beliefs v3 reveals my multi-facetted, multi-dimensional, multi-disciplinary practitioner self; my authentic self.
ohm

Summary

As I indicated in my last blog Charter of Values and Beliefs v2  (Page 2017b)
As a person new to formal academic research studies,  I have been surprised with the number of occasions that I have been confronted by a range of thoughts, feelings, observations, recollections – positives and learnings – and highlighted behavioural patterns over the course of my life, relative to my music practice. Over the past few months I realised that I did not have in fact, the clearest understanding of who I was as a creative practitioner at this moment in time (Page 2017b).
In an attempt to anchor my self to my creative practice, I developed my Charter of Values and Beliefs to maintain a valid contemporary values statement – a Charter of Values and Belief for both my self and my practice at any point in time. In doing this, I have been able to continue to observe a significant number of distinctions and insight into my multiple forms of practice and my self, and apply these reflexively to my self and practice.
full-2
This blog series is planned to continue next month with Research Practitioner Part 19. It is intended for this blog series to continue on a regular basis as I progress through my doctoral research project.
References
DLP 2017a image courtesy of Research Practitioner Part 16   Accessed 28th May, 2017
DLP 2017b image courtesy of Research Practitioner Part 20 Accessed 29th May, 2017
DLP 2017c image courtesy of Data for DLPs Project 1_Music and Sonic Collage.20170529.v39  Accessed 29th May, 2017
DLP 2017d image (Figure I) courtesy of Project 1 Research Study Developed Praxis v9k  Accessed 29th May, 2017
DLP 2016a image courtesy of David L Page. Accessed 31st December, 2016
DLP 2016b image courtesy of David L Page. Accessed 31st December, 2016
DLP 2016c image courtesy of David L Page. Accessed 31st December, 2016
Ohm image courtesy of: Ohm  Accessed 28th May, 2016
Onion image courtesy of: Onion Layers Accessed 28th March, 2015
Page, David 2017a Research Practitioner Part 16 Accessed 20th March 2017
Page, David 2017b Research Practitioner Part 14 Accessed 20th March 2017
Pulsating image courtesy of: Image Accessed 15th January, 2016
Research 2016 image courtesy of: Research Accessed 28th January 2016
Self Reflection 2016 image courtesy of: Self-reflection-for-personal-growth  Accessed 28th March, 2015
– ©David L Page 20/03/2017
– updated @David L Page 29/05/2017
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

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Education & Learning – the first 10,000 hours….

learning-philosophy

The first 10,000 hours of practice is everything…..

“10,000 hours. That is: 40 hours per week, for 48 weeks a year, for 5.2 years. A full-time employment workload excluding time where the aspiring practitioner is observing, or being talked through a task by a professional practitioner.  A full-time employment workload, excluding training periods where the aspiring practitioner is doing menial or non-related functions around the site of the practice. 10,000 hours of working in your practice, following process and developing your workflow.
10,000 hours of assessing situations; considering choices and options to proceed; making a decision as to which choice or option appears to be the most effective one to proceed; and proceeding.
10,000 hours of assessing the result of that workflow. Perhaps a positive outcome? Perhaps a not positive outcome, and needing to consider the other options one may have taken in a repeat of that situation in the coming weeks.
40 hours per week, 48 weeks a year, for 5.2 years of practice, doing. Experiencing, observing, reflecting, considering, deciding, and developing ones’ practice. 10,000 being a practitioner, in order to develop to a level that of a professional practitioner” (Page 2017a).

On the job training

In his 2012 blog Industry Outline, David L Page listed a diversity of roles within the audio industry, which were traditionally trained within industry as employment placements. The apprenticeship model served aspiring audio industry practitioners by providing an junior role opportunity within an industry-based practice, surrounded by professional practitioners. It was an ideal training ground for aspiring practitioners, An aspiring audio industry practitioner requires guidance and training to introduce them to all aspects of a studio:
“with skilled practitioners to observe, imitate and then the opportunity to apply as the situation provided: the importance of training in the workplace, “learning and working are interdependent” (Billet 2001, 39; Burgess 2013, 38). The “apprenticeship approach – modelling, coaching, scaffolding and fading” was used as it was found to be central to effective workplace-training techniques (Billet 2001, 145 in Page 2012).
The motivated aspiring practitioner needed to gain an industry placement, commit to doing a good job by imitating the professional practitioners, and over the course of five (5) to ten (10) years experience, they would develop themselves into professional practitioners on the basis of 10,000 hours practice (excluding training).

Changing worlds

However, with the ever diminishing opportunities within industry in such industry placements (particularly in audio with the decreasing number of  large format console studios in existence, but an increase in access to technology (see History of Music Production Part 4 Page 2015a), contemporary aspiring practitioners now have access to technology, but more than likely will be:
“without access to experienced and skilled technicians within work-place-training environments” (Hague 2010; Therbege 1997, 19 in Page 2015g)
In his 2013 blog (see Introduction to Audio Engineering), Page outlines what an aspiring practitioner needs to develop as part of their initial industry orientation.

The era of self-learning

In contemporary practice – in order to gain knowledge and develop one’s skills – aspiring practitioner are now required to possess the added personal qualities of discipline, commitment and the ability to self-learn. Effective DIY learning requires the aspiring practitioner to be resourceful – motivated and proactive in sourcing and seeking out information and learning opportunities. With the unlikelihood of finding an existing site to receive workplace-training, the contemporary practitioner needs to be resourceful in their quest to learn the art and craft. Accompanying their on-going practice, aspiring practitioners now also need to become “aware of the questions and problems” that all practitioners are likely to face (Burgess 2013, 35 in Page 2013). Whilst there is an abundance of resources today aimed at the DIY practitioners that are aligned to effective self-learning methods and tools, the aspiring practitioner must maintain their discipline, commitment and the ability to self learn; in order to gain the required knowledge and developed skill to practice at a professional level (Billet 2001, 71 in Page 2013).

Access to self-learning resource options

In his 2015b blog (see Research Practitioner Part 1) Page outlines the historical development of the audio industry, noting several historically significant resources that were developed.
“Today, there exists an enormous range of resources in the market place today to support contemporary DIY music practitioners. Sources of knowledge and influence include: 1) academic texts, academic journals, functional textbooks[4], industry associations, industry conferences, industry trade magazines, product and service providers, manufacturers and distributors, specialist professionals such technicians and engineers, forums, blogs and websites; courses, and; cultural production artifacts such as albums, CDs and mp3s. Additionally, professional level videos such as on Pensado’s Place and Lynda.com provide industry experienced and skilled technicians, with the benefit of this resource being it can be replayed infinite times. Burgess (2013, 35) encourages the practitioner to “learn as much as you can by imitation from the most experienced people who are available to you”. However, lacking in contemporary practice is having a more experienced and skilled technician observe one’s practice to provide appropriate feedback, further explanation and retraining as required. Networks and communities can provide such an opportunity, with experienced and skills technicians available to provide mentoring and training opportunities” (Page 2015b).

The era of self-reflection

“In addition to the imitation and experience, a third essential aspect of training in order to develop ones’ knowledge in order to develop ones’ practice is, reflection (Burgess 2013, 35; Schön 1983, 3; McKee 2003; Roth 1989). Reflection allows for the consideration of your practice – “to understand, question, and investigate” – to appraise if one’s current processes are the most appropriate, or ‘best practice’ (Brookfield 2002, 32). Certain scholars believe reflection is so essential, one will experience a “crisis of confidence in professional knowledge” if it is lacking from ones’ practice routine” (Schön 1983, 3 in Page 2015c). 
In order to become a professional practitioner, one must engage in one’s own development. One needs to adopt an attitude of self-learning across one’s life: life-long learning – constant and never-ending improvement. In order to become the best practitioner one can be, one must take every opportunity to learn. The most effective way to do this, is to become one’s own teacher – learning to observe and advise in, or on one’s own practice, and then make positive change to process. That is, develop one’s own reflective and reflexive practice. In Page’s blog (2016d) on his educational & learning practice, he notes:
“Given my approach to practice [see Layer 5: My approach to all forms of practice], I am of the belief that there is little point in being proactive in professional practice, without engaging in professional development research or learning. Further, having engaged in professional development research or learning, I need to take the process one step further and reflect upon what I have learnt, consider the possible application to the particular context I am engaged in; and to then decide for change, and to implement that change into my practice. Yes, being proactive in professional practice, means engaging in professional development research – that of reflective and reflexive practice” (Page 2016d).
To become a proactive reflective and reflexive practitioner is to proactively – consciously, systematically and rigorously – observe one’s practice for the purposes of analysis, evaluation and development. To become a proactive reflective and reflexive practitioner, is a to a large degree, to become self-reliant as a practitioner. This is not to say, that one must become a lone wolf – an island. This is to be prepared to embark on a developmental plan of one’s practice, without necessarily either the financial cost or time-cost to engage the services of a practice consultant to advise you on how you may develop your practice: an external person who is likely not to know your practice in any way close to how you know your own practice.

Reflection of practice, in order to be reflexive for practice

A professional practitioner therefore incorporates reflection into their practice. A professional practitioner will consciously, deliberately and systematically make the time to reflect on what they have been doing in their practice; considering any disparities and possible developments that they may have picked up from other practitioners that could potentially be incorporated into future practice (reflexive practice). Picking up innovative structures, techniques or equipment other practitioners may be employing in their practice process, to realise unique outcomes. This observation and reflection process may be done by whatever resources one has on hand: by direct observation of peers or mentors, via resources such as texts and videos, or via attending course (formal or informal).

Being proactive in the practitioner process

A professional practitioner is passionate about the practice they are engaged in, and therefore focussed in each and every day of practice. For most I have discussed with, there are never enough hours within the day to realise everything that they desired to get done. In my observation, professional practitioners are unrelenting:
“10,000 hours: 40 hours per week, 48 weeks a year, for 5.2 years of practice, doing. Experiencing, observing, reflecting, considering, deciding, and developing ones’ practice. 10,000 being a practitioner, in order to develop to a level that of a professional practitioner” (Page 2017a).
~DLP Pro Image Fun 5b small.20141020
(Page 2016a)

An advocate of 10,000 hours practice…..

Throughout his many forms of practice, Page (2015d) has espoused the need of 10,000 hours practice for several decades in his mentoring of aspiring practitioners. In his blog Professional Practice,
“my over riding philosophical stance embraces the 10,000 hours trades philosophy of skilled craftworkers (Ericsson et al 1993 in Page 2004). I value and believe in the merit of developing of a skill, a trade, a craft, or art – for that practitioner developing specialist knowledge and tools over many thousand’s of hours of practice, to ultimately express one self through uniquely personalised and developed content, information knowledge base and skill level. I consider this approach integral to becoming a professional practitioner” (Page 2004 i nPage 2015d).

Multiple practitioner

Page (2017b) has an extensive range of experience – and formal qualifications – across a number of fields and disciplines (see Linked-in Professional Profile). Namely in: Music Industry; Sound Production; Automotive Engineering; Business, Management & Communication; Education; and Governance. Across four (4) decades of practice, Page has learnt to invest him self into all of his practice. Irrespective of which discipline, he is focused at any moment in time in any one of his forms of practice. Page understands the importance of researching the field, encompassing the main elements of the discipline, and channelling this into his particular interpretation of what his practice will be within that field and discipline. Based on his personal cultural vision of values and beliefs, Page sculpts his practice with outcomes aligned to his self and motives (see Page 2017c Research Practitioner – Pt 16).
Page’s main practice as of 2017 resides in education & learning practice, academic research practice, creative practice, professional consulting practice and family responsibilities. It is worth noting, that over 10,000 hours of practice has been invested into each of his disciplinary practice at some point. I think would suggest that Page’s holistic view of practice is the result of having immersed himself into the number of industries and disciplines across his life as he has.

David L Page has been married for several decades..

With his life partner, Page has created a portfolio that allows him to pursue his diverse interests across a range of industries and disciplines (see Linked-in Professional Profile).
Given that both Page and his life partner came from different cultural backgrounds and experiences, they consciously developed their own culture – a conscious decision to blend particular values and beliefs from both of their diverse cultural backgrounds to accommodate and respect both parties view points and needs. It is interesting that this process was engaged in a number of decades ago, with Page becoming somewhat of a specialist in cultural development of organisations, designing and delivering a number of corporate training programs across the globe. The basis of this cultural orientation is embedded within what Page now refers to as his Charter of Values and Beliefs.

Creative practice

Page’s primary creative practice endeavours are as a writer, musician, songwriter, composer, sound engineer and producer.
“Music has been the one constant in my life, central to my being, accompanying me wherever I am, irrespective of whether I am physically playing, listening or internally listening via memory. Irrespective of the location, circumstance or event, music is within me. Music practice is not a choice for me; it is a necessity. I have practiced music for over four decades in multiple social and cultural contexts, and in significantly contrasting creative locations, such as a church choir singer, musician, songwriter, band member, teacher, project manager, engineer, solo artist, musician for hire, producer, and most recently an Electronic Music Producer and educator. I have engaged a (vast) range of technologies, using countless variations of workflow. I continue to practice music on a daily basis, engaging physical instruments, digital virtual technologies, or in the research, analysis, or listening to music styles” (Page 2015e, 5).
 Whilst his current motives for practice are not volume sales-based, on the back of my four decades of practice, he has his eyes very much on the future.
“I still have a lifetime of music goals still to realise: songs to write and arrange; sonic textures to explore; creative productions to develop; and engage with both my peers and the public to a far greater degree than I have to date” (Page 2015e, 6).
Page is also an Avid Technology Accredited Instructor (Pro Tools), mentoring and guiding aspiring musicians and producers in the development of their craft and art.

Research practice

Page is currently studying his Doctorate in Creative Industries at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia. The aim of this Doctor of Creative Industries Research Project is to investigate both his DIY music practice and his self as a practitioner during the process of creating and producing a cultural artefact (EP).  His research study is designed to be a mixed-method qualitative study: a practice-based, ethnographic study that is to include a first-person narrative of his personal journey, critical reflection and reflexive practice, highlighting the co-constituted nature of his music practice. As an auto-ethnographic study, he has designed the project with him performing the dual primary roles of being both the practitioner as subject, and the researcher. Such a multi-tiered examination represents a significant departure from current discussion of music practice, developing praxis of contemporary music practice. In this Project 1 research study exegesis submission, Page (2015f) intends to narrate the process to date, highlighting observations around him self as a practitioner, his music practice and the emergent distinctions integrated into his developing music praxis ( Music Practitioner Part 5).
As part of his academic research practice (but also part of his creative process within that process), Page has just written a series of memory blogs that follow his developmental process – reflecting on selected significant events in the early stages of his life, and associating sonic and musical textures that best represent his memory of those significant events. The collection of associative memories have then be formed into a composition of a fifteen (15) minute soundtrack of the first stage of his life. This cultural artefact is to make up one part of Page’s (2016b) Doctoral Project 1 submission (see Memory – Introduction).

Education & Learning practice

Page has spent almost three (3) decades in one form or another of education and learning practice. Predominantly situated in post-compulsory practice, he has experience in vocational , higher education and non-accredited proficiency-based education and learning practice. As part of this, Page has specialised in what he classifies as community education – providing education & learning opportunities for dis-advantaged groups. Such role have included that of mentor, coach, and facilitator. Currently, Page (2017b) is working as a Senior Lecturer in a Higher Education creative media institute in Australia.
“As a Senior Lecturer at SAE Institute Brisbane, David has provided Module coordination and/or instruction over the past five (5)  years in: audio theory (signal flow, microphone, audio processing, sound theory, acoustics, applied electronics, critical & analytical listening); pre-production, production & post-production (planning, tracking & mixing narrations, songs and soundtracks, including instrumentation & arrangement, across various formats – organic, virtual & fusions); creative media studies; reflective practice. David is currently the Higher Education (HE) Final Creative Projects Module Coordinator & Supervisor of audio-based final projects. David is an Avid Technology Accredited Instructor (Pro Tools).
SAE Institute is a Creative Media Institute offering a range of HE & HE Diploma offerings across the disciplines of Animation, Audio, Film, Game Design, Game Programming, Graphic Design & Web Programming at over 50 locations globally. SAE Institute is part of the Navitas Group “(Page 2017b).

Multi-facetted practitioner

In a recent blog, (Page 2017c) restated a resounding theme of his practice – the concept of the multi-facetted, multi-dimensional, multi-disciplinary practitioner. The practitioner who practices beyond boundaries of specific discipline practice. In his classrooms, Page encourages aspiring creative practitioners studying in the fields of animation, audio, film, graphic design, games development & programming, and web applications development to consider their practitioner positioning to be that of a broader creative practitioner.

DLPs Multi-faceted Practitioner.20170212.P4

(Page 2017c)
“I engage passionately in all forms of my multi-faceted practice, consisting of creative practice, research practice, or education & learning practice. After much observation, I now accept that the self informs my multi-faceted practice of creative practice, research practice, or education & learning practice – conceptually and literally. My multi-faceted practice of creative practice, research practice, or education & learning practice in turn informs/contributes to the self, even if that contribution is only with increased clarity around that particular practice, which in turn increases confidence within the self. I have observed within the self, that this increase in confidence in turn informs and/or shapes my practice – irrespective of what practice I am about to engage in – my creative practice, my research practice, or my education & learning practice. Over the course of the twelve (12) month research study Project 1, I have observed this cycle of interdependency and commonality between the self – my self – and the various incarnations of my practice – creative practice, research practice, or education & learning practice” (Page 2017c).

The importance of self in the practitioner process…

In commencing my research study, to investigate my music-making practice, I quickly realised that the self was core – central – to my practice. I had an immediate sense, that for me to better understand my practice, I needed to better understand my self. This came as a shock initially – something I rejected. “Me?” “My self?” I had studied my self over a number of decades, and I – of many practitioners I knew – had a great sense of who I was. But as I delved more into literature regarding both arts research and the self, I admitted that perhaps it couldn’t hurt to reinvestigate the self, from the perspective of this academic research study.
“Observing new music production technologies and associated workflows impacted my music practice and the realisation of my creative productions. I observed this phenomenon had an effect on the concept of my self, which then in turn had an effect on my motive to practice music. Music is acknowledged as being particularly important in terms of the development of the self” Hargreaves et al (2002) discuss how music facilitates self expression and development, allowing the self to transform, and construct new identities. Frith (1996,124) argues that “Music constructs our sense of identity through the direct experiences it offers of the body, time and sociability, experiences which enable us to place ourselves in imaginative cultural narratives” (Page 2015f)
Since engaging in my doctoral research study, I have embarked on several self-knowledge activities, such as the development of a Charter of Values and Beliefs (2017e, 2016c, 2016e). It has been an extremely beneficial process.
“Engaging in this research study has allowed me to continue to develop my self, increase my self confidence, develop clarity regarding my practice, and increase my confidence with this task at hand as a practitioner with my Research Study Project 1. In short, it has allowed me to become a more holistic and balanced practitioner – an expanded practitioner (see figure III below)” (Page 2016c)
Figure III – Project 1 Research Study Developed Approach (Page 2016c)
“While Bennett (2000, ii) concludes that “music is produced and consumed by young people in ways that both inform their sense of self and also serve to construct the social world in which their identities operate”. For many decades I have asked questions of my self, though always in isolation of my music practice. Velosa and Carvalho’s (2013) “Music Composition as a way of learning: emotions and the situated ‘self” and Taylor’s (2008) “Pink Noise: Queer Identity and Musical Performance in a local context” both stressed the importance of situating the self within the context of interest, in order to study it. There are a number of studies where this is done, from example Taylor’s (2012) and Peraino’s (2006) studies of gender. However, whilst an increasing number of music practice discussions include the element of self, however, few exist outside of academic-based articles or texts (DeNora 1999; MacDonald et al 2002; DeNora 2005; Peraino 2006; Taylor 2012 in Page 2015b)
One by product of my expanding the observation of my focus to all forms of my practice, is for my education & learning practice. Being a Senior Lecturer within a Higher Education (HE) Institute enables me to engage in discussions of practice and approach almost on a daily basis. Given my education & learning practitioner peers know my research study is centred around self, practitioner self, and a methodology of reflective and reflexive practice; I have been asked several times to provide some guidance as to how they could approach their education & learning practice in a more contemporary manner – integrating the elements of contemporary practice as I developed. I have conducted several professional development sessions for a specific discipline, and as well conducted my own small research project (see Reflecting on my educational practice Page 2016d), and then shared my findings to all academics at a staff meeting.
However, for the predominant number of creative practitioners who are now aspiring education & learning practitioners, this did not appear to be sufficient. I therefore considered options I had, and chose to adapt a holistic approach to education & learning practice I had from several decades ago, and include several elements of my Praxis v9k – self, motive (values & beliefs), decision to investigate, reflective practice and reflexive practice (Page 2017e).

DLP DCI Praxis v9i.20170420.P1.png

Figure I – Project 1 Research Study Developed Praxis v9k (Page 2017e)
The result is this generic Holistic Approach to Practice (2017d) – an outline of the steps or considerations tI take in preparing for every education & learning practice session I engage in.  Whilst it is not the purpose of explaining the detail of this approach in this blog post (see Research Practitioner Pt19 for more detail), I felt it had merit mentioning my approach. Perhaps it could be useful in reminding aspiring practitioners – those who is aspiring to realising 10,000 hours of practice – of the process that they may use when planning for the education & learning practice sessions they are about to engage in.
A Visual Representation of My Holistic Approach to Practice.20170521.v3Y(Page 2017d)

In Summary

This brief post has attempted to outline the need – if you aspire to becoming a professional practitioner in industry – of the need for you as a practitioner to:
  • be a resourceful self-learner;
  • be a reflective practitioner – consciously, deliberately and systematically
  • be a reflexive practitioner – consciously, deliberately and systematically, to develop your practice
  • be proactive in practice – focussed and passionate
“10,000 hours: 40 hours per week, 48 weeks a year, for 5.2 years of practice, doing. Experiencing, observing, reflecting, considering, deciding, and developing ones’ practice. 10,000 being a practitioner, in order to develop to a level that of a professional practitioner” (Page 2017a).

In Closing

As a supplementary measure, I have also embedded the following instructional you-tube – by Bosler and Greene (2017) “How to practice effectively…for just about anything”. I found that such a resource is excellent to use as motivation for aspiring practitioners – irrespective of their discipline. Whilst it is very focussed on music practitioners, this presentation holds universal truths for effective practice that can be applied I believe, to any practice situation.
Bosler and Greene (2017) “How to practice effectively…for just about anything”
This blog series is planned to continue with another in the series of education & learning.
References
Billett, Stephen. 2001. Learning in the workplace: strategies for effective practice. Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin.
Bosler, Annie and Greene, Don (2017) “How to practice effectively…for just about anything”.   Accessed 28th February 2017
Brookfield, Stephen D. 2002. “Using the lenses of critically reflective teaching in the community college classroom.” New Directions for Community Colleges 2002 (118): 31-38.
Burgess, Richard James. 2013. The art of music production: the theory and practice. New York: Oxford University Press.
Ericsson, K.A., Krampe, R.T. and Tesch-Römer, C., 1993. The role of deliberate practice in the acquisition of expert performance. Psychological review100(3), p.363.
Frith, Simon. 1992. The industrialization of popular music. Popular Music and Communication 2: 49-74.
Hague, Graeme. 2010. “Recording and production: make and record music now.” Guerilla Guide (29): 131. Accessed May 16, 2015.
Hargreaves, DJ, D Miell and RAR MacDonald. 2002. What are musical identities, and why are they important? In Musical Identities, edited by RAR MacDonald, DJ Hargreaves and D Miell, 1-20. Oxford Oxford University Press.
Learning image courtesy of: Pedagogy vs Andragogy chart Accessed 28th February 2017
Lynda.com. 2017. Lynda.com   Accessed 28th February 2017
McKee, Alan. 2003. Textual analysis: a beginner’s guide. London: Sage.
Page, David L. 2017a. Quote by David L Page in practice.  Accessed 28th February 2017.
Page, David L. 2017b. Linked-in Professional Profile.  Accessed 28th February 2017.
Page, David L. 2017c. Research Practitioner Part 16  Accessed 28th February 2017
Page, David L. 2017d. Generic Holistic Approach to Practice.  Accessed 28th February 2017.
Page, David L. 2017e. Research Practitioner Part 18/Charter of Values & Beliefs v3  Accessed 21st April 2017
Page, David L. 2016a. David L Page  Accessed 28th February 2017.
Page, David L. 2016b. Memory- Introduction.  Accessed 28th February 2017.
Page, David L. 2016c.  Charter of Values and Beliefs v2.  Accessed 28th February 2017.
Page, David L. 2016d Reflecting on my educational practice  Accessed 28th February 2017.
Page, David L. 2016e Charter of Values & Beliefs v1   Accessed 28th February 2017.
Page, David L. 2015a. History of Music Production Part 4  Accessed 28th February 2017.
Page, David L. 2015b. Research Practitioner Part 1 Accessed 28th February 2017.
Page, David L. 2015c. Music Practitioner Part 3 Reflective Practitioner Accessed 28th February 2017
Page, David L. 2015d. Educational Philosophy Part 2 Accessed 28th February 2017
Page, David L. 2015e. “Contemporary DIY music production practice, and the implications for effective practice” Doctoral research study KKP623 Contextual Review submission. Personal collection.  Accessed 18th February 2017
Page, David L. 2015f. Music Practitioner Part 5 Accessed 28th February 2017
Page, David L. 2015g. Critical Listening Part 1 Accessed 28th February 2017
Page, David L. 2013. Introduction to Audio Engineering Accessed 28th February 2017
Page, David L. 2012. Industry Outline Accessed 28th February 2017
Page, David L. 2004. Educational Philosophy Part 1 Accessed 28th February 2017
Pensado’s Place. 2017.  Pensado’s Place  Accessed 28th February 2017
Roth, Robert A. 1989. “Preparing the reflective practitioner: transforming the apprentice through the dialectic.” Journal of Teacher Education 40 (2): 31-35.
Schön, Donald A. 1983. The reflective practitioner: how professionals think in action. Aldershot, England: Arena.
Théberge, Paul. 1997. Any sound you can make: making music/consuming technology. Hanover: University Press of New England.
Bibliography
Armstrong, Thomas. 1999. 7 Kinds of Smart: Identifying and Developing Your Multiple Intelligences. New York: Plume Books.
Boud, David, Rosemary Keogh and David Walker. 2013. Reflection: turning experience into learning. New York: Routledge.
Bradbury, Helen, Nick Frost, Sue Kilminster and Miriam Zukus. 2010. Beyond reflective practice: new approaches to professional lifelong learning. New York: Routledge.
Brookfield, Stephen D. 2006. The skillful teacher: on technique, trust, and responsiveness in the classroom. 2 ed. San Francisco: The Jossey Bass.
Brookfield, Stephen D. 1995. Becoming a critically reflective teacher. San Francisco: Jossey Bass
Brookfield, Stephen. 1986. Understanding and facilitating adult learning: A comprehensive analysis of principles and effective practices. Milton Keynes: Open University Press.
Covey, Stephen R. 2013. The 8th habit: From effectiveness to greatness. New York: Simon and Schuster.
Covey, Stephen R. 1991. Principle centered leadership. New York: Simon and Schuster.
Covey, Stephen R. 1989. The 7 habits of highly effective people. Melbourne: The Business Library.
Entwistle, Noel and Paul Ramsden. 1983. Understanding Student Learning. New York: Routledge Revivals.
Gardner, Howard and Thomas Hatch. 1989. “Multiple Intelligences go to school: educational implications of the theory of multiple intelligences.” Educational researcher 18 (8): 4-10.
Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences image courtesy of:  Gardners’ MI   Accessed 28th March 2015
Griffiths, Morweena. 2010. “Research and the self.” In The Routledge companion to research in the arts, edited by M Biggs and H Karlsson, 167-185. London: Routledge.
Haseman, B 2015. “Forensic reflective practice: effecting personal and systemic change.” Accessed May 24, 2015. https://blackboard.qut.edu.au/webapps/blackboard/content/listContent.jsp?course_id=_118711_1&content_id=_5744651_1.
Knowles, Malcolm S, Elwood F Holton III and Richard A Swanson. 2012. The adult learner: the definitive classic in adult education and human resource development. 7 ed. New York: Routledge.
Lawrence-Wilkes, L. & Chapman, A. 2015. Reflective Practice. Accessed March 28th, 2015 http://www.businessballs.com/reflective-practice.htm
Light, Greg, Susanna Calkins and Roy Cox. 2009. Learning and teaching in higher education: the reflective professional. London: Sage.
Merriam, Sharan B. 2001. “Andragogy and self‐directed learning: Pillars of adult learning theory.” New directions for adult and continuing education 2001 (89): 3-14.
Page, David L. 2014a Doctoral Research Study Part 2  Accessed 30th April 2017
Page, David L. 2014b Doctoral Research Study Part 1  Accessed 30th April 2017
Pascal, J., & Thompson, N. 2012. Developing critically reflective practice. Reflective Practice, 13(2), 311. doi: 10.1080/14623943.2012.657795
Roth, Robert. 1989. “Preparing the reflective practitioner: transforming the apprentice through the dialectic“. Journal of Teacher Education 40 (2): 31-35
Ryan, Mary Elizabeth. 2014. Reflective practice in the arts. In Literacy in the Arts, edited by G Barton, 77-90. London: Springer.
SAE Institute, 2015 SAE Institute Accessed 28th March 2015
Schön, Donald A. 1987. Educating the Reflective Practitioner, San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. 355 + xvii pages.
Schön, Donald A. 1983. The reflective practitioner: how professionals think in action. Aldershot, England: Arena.
– ©David L Page 28/02//2017
– updated @David L Page 30/04/2017
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

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Research Practitioner Part 14

Doctorate of Creative Industries Project 1

research

(Research 2016)

Precis

Continuing on from my previous blogs in this series; as I am now at the end of my second year of my post-graduate academic research studies, I felt it is important to revisit and develop my Charter of Values and Beliefs v1 of goals, values and beliefs for both myself and my music practice.
I have taken the liberty to re-post my findings at the end of Year 1 as I have gained considerable more insight relative to the last post I made on the 25th April 2016.
The Art of self-reflection
(Self Reflection 2016)
Over the course of the seven (7) months of life, music practice and reflective practice, I have crystallised my thoughts and understandings, and gained fresh levels of clarity about my self and practice. The most notable development to the Year 1 (2015) Charter of Values and Beliefs v1 was over the last quarter of this year, in my efforts to balance full-time work and full-time research study commitments, and family responsibilities, I became quite stressed. In re-reading my Charter, I reassessed the order and priority of my item 1b. In the original 2015 description I had listed 1b as being:
1b. Self: I strive to be balanced, to be a balanced, functional human being – affective, expressive and communicative – mentally, physically, spiritually [Goal]. Whilst being very busy, I believe I have balance in my life. I believe I am a balanced, functional human being – affective, expressive and communicative – mentally, physically, spiritually [Belief]
However, over the last three months of 2016 I appraised my self as being anything but balanced. I have now reflected and found that this imbalance has come as a result of choosing to overlook the balance of my spiritual, physical and mental being.
In the 2015 listing, I had ordered the three areas of priority as being mentally, physically and spiritually. However, in reflecting on these areas, I realised that their priority was incorrect for me, and my priority was in fact the reverse order of this: spirituality was my highest priority, followed by physical, and then followed by intellectual – mental. In my addressing my imbalance, by focussing on the order of these in terms of spiritual, physical and mental I quickly returned to a greater degree of balance.
As I had essentially looked over the spiritual aspect in my original Charter, I recognised the oversight of this, and therefore I added some additional points in, including 1b for example.
1b. Self: In life, I value a spiritual approach to life – to experience, to learn, and to develop respect and acceptance [Value]. I strive to maintain spiritual balance within my life – to experience, to learn, and to develop respect and acceptance [Goal]. I believe we are spiritual beings, engaging in a human experience. I believe my human journey is to resolve the limitations, contradictions and inconsistencies of being human – to experience, to learn, and to develop respect and acceptance – and to engage congruently within the physical world [Belief]. [see *Note above].
I remain surprised with the number of occasions that I have been confronted by a range of thoughts, feelings, observations, recollections – positives and learnings – and highlighted behavioural patterns over the course of my life, relative to my music practice. Over the past seven (7) months of embarking on my research study, I have increasingly developed a clearer understanding of who I am as a self, and as a creative practitioner. No doubt this view is likely to continue to develop as I progress with my research study, but given I was nearing the completion of Project 1, I felt it was timely to update my Charter of Values and Beliefs.

~DLP Pro Image 1.20141020

(DLP 2016)

DLP’s Charter of Values and Beliefs v2

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Year 1 Research Study Part 1a – who I know I am now

1a. Self: In life, I value a holistic perspective [Value]. I strive to consider life from a global holistic perspective [Goal]. I believe I consider my life and varied forms of practice from a global holistic perspective [Belief]
1b. Self: In life, I value a spiritual approach to life – to experience, to learn, and to develop respect and acceptance [Value]. I strive to maintain spiritual balance within my life – to experience, to learn, and to develop respect and acceptance [Goal]. I believe we are spiritual beings, engaging in a human experience. I believe my human journey is to resolve the limitations, contradictions and inconsistencies of being human – to experience, to learn, and to develop respect and acceptance – and to engage congruently within the physical world [Belief]. [see *Note below].
1c. Self: In life, I value balance [Value].I strive to be balanced, to be a balanced, functional human being – affective, expressive and communicative – spiritually, physically and mentally [Goal]. Whilst being very busy, I believe I have balance in my life. I believe I am a balanced, functional human being – affective, expressive and communicative – spiritually, physically and mentally [Belief]
[*Note: though I became quite imbalanced over the last three months of 2016, by choosing to overlook the balance of my spiritual, physical and mental being. I am happy to report though, this balance has mostly returned by the close of the year].
1d. Self: In life, I value diversity of orientation [Value]. I am very end product/goal-orientated with actions; and I also very process-orientated with expression and reflection [Goal].Being contrast orientated, I believe I have a great opportunity in life. I believe I am target-orientated and effective and efficient in realising personal goals: I believe I do not waiver from my focus. However along the journey, I believe I am process-orientated in my expression and reflection. I believe I immerse my self in the process [Belief] [see *Note above].
1e. Self: In life, I value physical connection [Value. I strive for physical connection in everything I do [Goal]. I believe I am a physical being – a tactile being, a kinesthetic being, a sensual being [Belief] [see *Note above].
1f. Self: In life, I value an open intellect/mindfulness [Value]. I strive to approach life with an open and inquiring mind [Goal]. I believe I approach most aspects of my life with an open and inquiring mind, applying thought and mindfulness [Belief]
1g. Self: In life, I value emotion [Value]. I strive to be emotionally connected [Goal]. I believe I am an affected being [Belief][see *Note above].
1h. Self: In life, I value joy [Value]. I strive to be connected to joy and happiness [Goal]. I believe I am a joyful being [Belief][see *Note above].
1i. Self: I value a sincere and deep level of engagement with others [Value]. I aspire to engaging with others in a sincere way, and to a deep level of engagement with others [Goal]. I believe I engage with others in a sincere way, and to a deep level of engagement with others – in a genuine and congruent manner [Belief][see *Note above].
1j. Self: I value nurturing as a human quality [Value].I aspire to be a nurturing soul [Goal]. I believe I am a nurturing soul [Belief] [see *Note above].

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Year 1 Research Study Part 1b – who I know I am now as a practitioner

2a. Self & Practice: In my life I value self-reliance [Value]. I aspire to being self-reliant [Goal]. I believe I am able to be self-reliant in most aspects of my life, but choose to, or not to as I see appropriate [Belief][see *Note above].
2b. Self & Practice: I value a high standard of practice [Value]. I aspire to execute a high standard of practice [Goal]. I believe I operate at a high standard of practice in most areas of my life [Belief].
2c. Self & Practice: I value a high volume of post-training practice (10,000 hours) in order to develop a professional level of knowledge and skill in that practice [Value]. In any form of new practice I choose to learn, I set the goal on 10,000 hours of post-training practice in order to develop a professional level of knowledge and skill in that practice [Goal]. The forms of practice I have developed a professional level of knowledge and skill in, is the result of having invested 10,000 hours of post-training practice [Belief].
2d. Self & Practice: I value diversity of orientation in my practice [Value]. I am very end product/goal-orientated with actions; and I also very process-orientated with expression and reflection [Goal]. Being contrast orientated, I believe I have a great opportunity in life. I believe I am target-orientated, effective and efficient in realising goals for my practice: I believe I do not waiver from the output focus for that practice. However within practice, I believe I immerse my self in the process of practice with my expression and reflection [Belief] [see *Note above].
2e. Self & Practice: I value a complex multi-dimensional approach to practice [Value]. I aspire to execute a complex multi-dimensional approach within my practice [Goal]. I believe I execute a complex multi-dimensional approach within my practice [Belief].
2f. Self & Practice: I value spontaneity (being spontaneous = freedom for DLP) [Value]. I aspire to spontaneously – effortlessly, naturally – alter my practice as I see fit/appropriate [Goal]. I believe I operate in a spontaneous manner – effortlessly, naturally, within my practice [Belief].
2g. Self & Practice: In my life I value being prepared [Value]. I aspire to being prepared in all situations, facilitating optimum engagement and maximizing the opportunity of an optimum experience for others [Goal]. I believe I prepare thoroughly for my practice, facilitating optimum engagement and maximizing the opportunity of an optimum experience for others. I believe such preparation is an integral part of the practice process [Belief] [see *Note above].
2h Self & Practice: In my life I value appearing to be in a relaxed state [Value]. I aspire to appearing to be in a relaxed state in all situations, enabling the execution of what appears to be an effortless/natural/automatic high level of practice; in turn facilitating optimum engagement and maximizing the opportunity of an optimum experience for others [Goal]. I believe I prepare thoroughly for my practice, prior to practice, in order to be in a relaxed stated at the time of public practice (ie the performance). Being in this state in turn facilitates optimum engagement and maximizes the opportunity of an optimum experience for others. I believe such a relaxed state in public performance is a key element of the practice process [Belief] [see *Note above].
2i. Self & Practice: I value practice that provides opportunities for nurturing [Value]. I aspire to practice that provides opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Goal]. I believe I engage in practice that provides opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Belief][see *Note above].

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Year 1 Research Study Part 1c – who I know I am as a practitioner

3a. Social and Cultural contexts: I value social and cultural diversity [Value]. I strive to live across a very wide and broad range of social and cultural contexts – countries and cultures in my life [Goal]. I believe I embrace a very wide and broad range of of social and cultural contexts – countries and cultures in my life [Belief].
3b. Social and Cultural contexts: I value equal opportunity for all – irrespective of gender, race, sexual preference, impairment [Value]. I strive to provide equitable levels of service and practice for all – irrespective of gender, race, sexual preference, impairment [Goal].I believe I assist people by providing equitable levels of service and practice for all – irrespective of gender, race, sexual preference, impairment [Belief].
3c. Social and Cultural contexts: I value opportunity for all for learning and development to navigate their life  – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… (what I refer to as “community education”) [Value]. I strive to assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life –  their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community education”) [Goal]. I believe I assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community education”) [Belief].
3d. Social and Cultural contexts: I value opportunities in contexts that provide opportunities for nurturing [Value]. I aspire to practice in contexts that provides opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Goal]. I believe I engage in practice in contexts which provides opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Belief].

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Year 1 Research Study Part 1d – who I know I am as a music practitioner

4a. Music Practice: I value diversity of orientation in my practice [Value]. I strive to exercise both a goal-orientation (product), and a process-orientation (process) with my music practice [Goal].Being contrast orientated, I believe there is a great opportunity in my music practice. I believe my target-orientation allows me to effectively and efficiently realise goals for my music practice, not wavering from the output focus for that music practice. However within my music practice, I believe I immerse my self in the process of the music practice with my expression and reflection for creative benefit [Belief].
4b. Music Practice: I value social and cultural diversity of music style [Value].I strive to experience and be influenced by a very wide and broad range of diversity of music styles in my life [Goal]. I believe I am open to experience and be influenced by a very wide and broad range of diversity of music styles [Belief].
4c. Music Practice: I value the practice of music in a supportive environment or culture [Value]. I strive to practice music in a supportive culture and environment in my life [Goal]. I believe I practice music in a supportive culture and environment [Belief]
4d. Music Practice: I value the practice of music to assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community music education”) [Value]. I strive to practice music to assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community music education”) [Goal]. I believe the practice of music can assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community music education”) [Belief]. I believe I practice music to assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community music education”) [Belief].
4e. Music Practice: I value the practice of music which provide opportunities for nurturing [Value]. I aspire to practice music which provides opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Goal]. I believe I engage in the practice of music to provide opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Belief]. I believe I practice music in a manner that is nurturing (of both my self and others) [Belief].

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Year 1 Research Study Part 1e – who I know I am as a music practitioner

5a. Composition & Performance: I value diversity of orientation in my composition and performance practice [Value]. I strive to exercise both a goal-orientation (product), and a process-orientation (process) with my composition and performance practice [Goal]. Being contrast orientated, I believe there is a great opportunity in my composition and performance practice. I believe my target-orientation allows me to effectively and efficiently realise goals for my composition and performance practice, not wavering from the aim and objective focus for that practice. However within that practice, I believe I immerse my self in the process of the composition and performance practice with my expression and reflection for creative benefit. I believe I am in the moment during that practice [Belief].
5b. Composition & Performance: I value compositions combining a range of music and sonic textures, appropriate to the music style [Value]. I strive to create compositions integrating a range of music and sonic textures into all of my compositions and performances, appropriate to the music style [Goal]. I believe I integrate a range of music and sonic textures into all of my compositions and performances, appropriate to the music style [Belief].
5c. Composition & Performance: I value compositions combining a range of music and sonic textures, woven together in a holistic cohesive manner [Value]. I strive as a music practitioner to create and play compositions combining a range of music and sonic textures, woven together in a holistic cohesive manner [Goal]. I believe as a music practitioner, I create and play compositions combining a range of music and sonic textures, woven together in a holistic cohesive manner [Belief].
5d. Composition & Performance: I value performing the instruments and musical parts I play, in and around other instruments, integrating/gluing all of the instrumental music and sonic textures together [Value]. I strive to perform the instruments and musical parts I play, in and around other instruments, integrating/gluing all of the instrumental music and sonic textures together [Goal]. I believe I perform the instruments and musical parts I play, in and around other instruments, integrating/gluing all of the instrumental music and sonic textures together [Belief]
5e. Composition & Performance: I value composing and performing music that is nurturing of both my self and others [Value]. I aspire to compose and perform music that is nurturing of both my self and others[Goal]. I believe I compose and perform music that is nurturing of both my self and others [Belief].I believe I practice music in a manner that is nurturing of both my self and others [Belief].

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Year 2 Research Study Part 2a – who I am discovering/accepting my self to be as a practitioner

6a. Self & Professional Practice: I value diversity of orientation in my professional practice [Value].I strive to exercise both a goal-orientation (product), and a process-orientation (process) with my professional practice [Goal]. Being contrast orientated, I believe there is a great opportunity in professional practice. I believe my target-orientation allows me to effectively and efficiently realise goals for my professional practice, not wavering from the aim and objective focus for that practice. However within that professional practice, I believe I believe I am in the moment. I immerse my self in the process of that practice with my expression and reflection, for great benefit to both my self and my practice. [Belief].
6b. Self & Professional Practice: In my life I value reflection – conscious, deliberate, systematic, interrogative introspection in order to consider, critically analyse and appraise my self and my practice [Value]. I aspire to being reflective – conscious, deliberate, systematic, interrogative introspection in order to consider, critically analyse and appraise my self and my practice (family, music, education, research and management & governance) as appropriate  [Goal]. I am able to be reflective – conscious, deliberate, systematic, interrogative introspection in order to consider, critically analyse and appraise my self and my practice (family, music, education, research and management & governance) as appropriate [Belief].
6c. Self & Professional Practice: In my life I value ongoing development – constant and never-ending reflexive practice, in order to maintain proactive development of my self and my practice [Value]. I aspire to ongoing development – constant and never-ending reflexive practice, in order to maintain proactive development of my self and my practice (family, music, education, research and management & governance) as appropriate [Goal]. I believe I am committed to ongoing development – constant and never-ending reflexive practice, in order to maintain proactive development of my self and my practice (family, music, education, research and management & governance) as appropriate [Belief].
6d. Self & Professional Practice: I value varied motives of practice [Value]. I strive to practice resulting from many varied motivations [Goal]. I believe I practice as a result of:
  • Discovery (to use music practice as a medium for exploring, attempting to do something which you haven’t done previously);
  • Technically (to technically develop one’s skills);
  • Social (to connect to others);
  • Affectively (to express or connect to emotion);
  • Aesthetically (for expression or engagement in something artistic or of beauty);
  • Creatively (for action, just to do);
  • Physical (for physical expression, for exercise];
  • Commercial (for income generation purposes);
  • Educational (to demonstrate specific practice to my students, live or in preparation);
  • Cathartic (for self-development or intervention purposes. For me to connect with my emotions – to notice, to reflect, to acknowledge the emotion, and their significance, to work through that emotional experience – to deal with specific and/or significant events, and hopefully in doing so, move beyond certain emotions associated with these significant events, developing my self);
  • Performance (to maximise my performance standard, and what others get to see of me/ practice);
  • Nurturing (core to my Charter of Values is nurturing – nurturing of self and others. I demonstrate in my education & learning practice; nurturing of both others (eg when I am ‘performing’ either a} and myself in my creative practice; and nurturing of myself in my research practice) [Belief].
6e. Self & Professional Practice: In my life I value nurturing [Value]. I aspire to be nurturing being – of my self and others – across my areas of my practice (family, music, education, research, practice) as appropriate [Goal]. I believe I am a nurturing being – of my self and others – across my areas of my practice (family, music, education, research, practice) – a social carer, an encourager, a coach, a mentor, an educator, a friend…. as appropriate [Belief].

~DLP Pro Image 1.20141020

(DLP 2016)
As I developed my Research Study through Project 1 in the second year of my doctoral studies, I developed my Charter of Values and Beliefs progressively, and updated the following as of 31st December 2016.

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Year 2 Research Study Part 2b – who I am discovering/accepting my self to be as a music practitioner

7a. Self & Music Practice: As a contemporary music practitioner, I value the practice of music across all of the six (6) stages of music practice: performance, creation, pre-production, production, post-production, and distribution [Value]. As a contemporary music practitioner, I strive to practice music across all of the six (6) stages of music practice: performance, creation, pre-production, production, post-production, and distribution[Goal]. As a contemporary music practitioner, I believe I practice music across all of the six (6) stages of music practice: performance, creation, pre-production, production, post-production, and distribution [Belief].
7b. Self & Music Practice: I value music primarily for its affective, expressive and communicative qualities [Value]. I strive to perform and compose music primarily for its affective, expressive and communicative qualities [Goal]. I believe I perform and compose music primarily for its affective, expressive and communicative qualities [Belief]
7c. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of music motivated by a diversity of intentions – the majority of which are non-commercial [Value]. I strive to practice music motivated by a diversity of intentions in my life – the majority of which are non-commercial [Goal]. I believe I practice music motivated by a diversity of intentions – the majority of which are non-commercial such as:
  • Discovery (to use music practice as a medium for exploring, attempting to do something which you haven’t done previously)
  • Technically (to use music practice as a medium to practice one’s craft, and technically develop one’s craft skills)
  • Social (to use music practice as a medium for social interaction purposes, to connect to others [communicative])
  • Affectively (to use music practice as a medium to express or connect to emotion)
  • Aesthetically (to use music practice as a medium for expression or engagement in something artistic or of beauty)
  • Creatively (to use music practice as a medium for action, just to do [expressivity])
  • Physical (to use music practice as a medium for physical expression, for exercise]
  • Commercial (to use music practice as a medium for income generation purposes)
  • Educational (to demonstrate specific music practice to my students, live or in preparation)
  • Cathartic (self-development or intervention purposes. For me to connect with my emotions – to notice, to reflect, to acknowledge the emotion, and their significance, to work through that emotional experience – to deal with specific and/or significant events, and hopefully in doing so, move beyond certain emotions associated with these significant events, developing my self)
  • Performance (where my primary motive is to perform, and therefore all creation and creative development is built upon wanting to maximise my performance standard, and what others get to see of me/my art/my music practice
  • Nurturing (core to my Charter of Values is nurturing – nurturing of self and others. I demonstrate in my education & learning practice; nurturing of both others (eg when I am ‘performing’ either a} and myself in my creative practice; and nurturing of myself in my research practice) [Belief]
7d. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of listening to music on any of the three levels: holistic, associative, or critical and analytical listening [Value]. I strive to practice listening to music on any of the three levels: holistic, associative, and critical and analytical listening [Goal]. I believe I practice listening to music on all of the three levels: holistic, associative, and critical and analytical listening [Belief].
7e. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of music of a range of cultural origins [Value]. I strive to practice music across of a range of cultural origins [Goal]. I believe I practice music across a range of cultural origins [Belief]

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Year 2 Research Study Part 2c – who I am discovering/accepting myself to be as a music practitioner

8a. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of music across a range of diverse technologies [Value]. I strive to practice music across a range of diverse technologies [Goal]. I believe I practice music across a range of diverse technologies [Belief].
8b. Self & Music Practice: Intuitively, I value physical instruments that emit vibrations and resonances, of a style and size I can physically embrace [Value]. I intuitively research across a range of physical instruments to play that emit vibrations and resonances, of a style and size I can physically embrace [Goal]. I believe I intuitively search for and play a range of physical instruments that emit vibrations and resonances, of a style and size I can physically embrace [Belief].
8c. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of music in a range of diverse sites, where one site’s practice can influence and/or inform another form of practice in another site [Value]. I strive to practice music in a range of diverse sites, where one site’s practice can influence and/or inform another form of practice in another site [Goal]. I believe I practice music in a range of diverse sites, where one site’s practice such as live performance influences and informs another form of practice in another site such as studio performance; which in turn can influence and inform another form of practice such as live performance [Belief].
8d. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of music across a range of diverse holistic work practice, including compositional songs and soundtracks [Value]. I strive to practice music across a range of diverse holistic work practice, including compositional songs and soundtracks [Goal]. I believe I practice music across a range of diverse holistic work practice, including compositional songs and soundtracks [Belief].
8e. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of music across a range of diverse (micro) workflows [Value]. I strive to practice music across a range of diverse (micro) workflows [Goal]. I believe I practice music across a range of diverse (micro) workflows [Belief].

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Year 2 Research Study Part 2d – who I am discovering/accepting my self to be as a music practitioner

9a. Composition & Performance Technology: I value a diversity of technology in the creation and layering of musical and sonic textures within the music practice of composition and performance – analogue, digital or digital virtual devices [Value]. I strive to create a diversity of technology in the creation and layering of musical and sonic textures within the music practice of composition and performance – analogue, digital or digital virtual devices [Goal]. I believe I use a diversity of technology to create and layer the musical and sonic textures within my music practice of composition and performance – analogue, digital or digital virtual devices.  I have developed a diverse range of technology to create and layer musical and sonic textures within my music practice of composition and performance – analogue, digital or digital virtual devices [Belief].
9b. Composition & Performance Technology: I value both acoustic style instruments and their timbre, and the manipulation of at-the-time generated or pre-recorded sound sources for creative purposes  [Value]. I strive as a music practitioner to integrate the initial primary focus of acoustic style instruments and their timbre, with the manipulation of at-the-time generated or pre-recorded sound sources for creative purposes [Goal].I believe as a music practitioner I attempt to integrate the initial primary focus of acoustic style instruments and their timbre, with the manipulation of at-the-time generated or pre-recorded sound sources for creative purposes [Belief]. I believe I developed my live/studio technology (my rig) to facilitate the manipulation and layering of sonic textures, and duplicate these irrespective of location – in both live and studio settings [Belief].
9c. Composition & Performance Technology: I value the manipulation and layering of sonic textures must be duplicable equally in live and studio settings. Therefore my rig must facilitate sourcing these sonic textures irrespective of site [Value]. I strive to manipulate and layer sonic textures and duplicate equally in live and studio settings. I strive to develop my live/studio technology (my rig) to facilitate sourcing these sonic textures irrespective of site [Goal]. I believe I manipulate and layer sonic textures and duplicate equally in live and studio settings. I believe I have developed my live/studio technology (my rig) to facilitate sourcing these sonic textures irrespective of site [Belief].

onion-layers

Year 2 Research Study Part 2e – who I am discovering/accepting my self to be as a music practitioner

10a. Creative Practitioner: I value diversity of orientation as a creative practitioner [Value]. I strive to exercise both a goal-orientation (product), and a process-orientation (process) as a creative practitioner [Goal]. Being contrast orientated, I believe there is a great opportunity as a creative practitioner. I believe my target-orientation allows me to effectively and efficiently realise goals, not wavering from the aim and objective focus of that practice. However, I believe I am in the moment as a creative practitioner, fully immersed in the process of my creative practice [Belief].
10b. Creative Practitioner: I value music practice with origins in, and for artistic expression, over music practice solely reliant on craft expression [Value]. I strive to practice music for artistic expression, over music practice solely for craft expression [Goal]. I believe I am now practicing music for artistic expression, rather that practicing music solely for craft expression [Belief].
10c. Creative Practitioner:  I value a described music praxis – a framework that articulates the interdependent elements for consideration during the stages of one’s music practice [Value]. I strive to describe my music praxis – a framework that articulates the interdependent elements for consideration during the stages of one’s music practice [Goal]. I believe I have developed a considered music praxis – a framework that articulates the elements for consideration during the stages one’s music practice. These primary elements of my Music Practice Praxis v8i (see figure I below) are: listening, self, reflection/reflective practice, reflexive practice, motive, theme, song mood, decision to commence, music production approach, compositional approach, agreed reference track, music style, simple versus complex textures, technology, site, holistic work practice, micro workflow, aesthetic choices, time opportunity, and social network engagement [Belief].

DLP DCI Praxis v8i.20161231.P1

Figure I – Project 1 Research Study Developed Praxis v8i (Page 2016c)
10d. Creative Practitioner: I value independent self-reliant solo performers who aspired to create multi-timbral and multi-layered soundscapes in each and every performance, irrespective of motive, musical style or site [Value]. I strive to be an independent self-reliant solo performer who aspires to create multi-timbral and multi-layered soundscapes in each and every performance, irrespective of motive, musical style or site [Goal]. I believe I am an independent self-reliant solo performer who aspires to create multi-timbral and multi-layered soundscapes in each and every performance, irrespective of motive, musical style or site [Belief].

onion-layers

Significant Differences between my Project 1 end Year 1 Charter of Values and Beliefs v1, and my end Year 2 Charter of Values and Beliefs v2

In addition to the two areas I have already noted – 1b and 1c – I will now note some of the significant developments between my Project 1 end Year 1 Charter of Values and Beliefs v1, and my end Year 2 Charter of Values and Beliefs v2.
I added diversity of orientation. Whilst this quality could possibly be inferred from a number of items within my Year 1 Charter of Values and Beliefs, I believe I needed to make it more explicit given it was something that I observed had significant impact on my self and my practice. In pursuing my practice across Year 2, I noted on many occasions that I  was both end product/goal-orientated, and process-orientated. These were quite often at odds with each other, and sometimes I considered them to be mutually exclusive. However, as Year 2 progressed, I realised that there were examples of my approach to practice where these two orientations sat very comfortably side by side in my orientation to practice.  I believe this dual orientation affords me a great opportunity in life. My target-orientatation allows me to be effective and efficient in realising personal goals, not wavering from my focus. However within my practice, in the act of doing and being present within practice, I believe I am process-orientated in my expression and reflection. I believe I immerse my self in the process, and this orientation provides great benefit to both my self, and my practice. Given this positive impact on my self, my practitioner self, and my practice, I therefore added paragraphs 1d, 2c, 4a, 6a and 10a.
I also added nurturing as a human quality. Whilst this was present in my original Charter of Values and Beliefs as paragraph 6d, I observed this quality was missing in other aspects of my life and practice. I therefore added it into paragraphs 1j, 2i, 3d, 4e and 5e.
The five other additions to my Charter of Values and Beliefs v2 that were more practice-based focussed were:
2b. Self & Practice: a high standard of practice;  2c. Self & Practice: a high volume of post-training practice (10,000 hours); 2e. Self & Practice: a complex multi-dimensional approach to practice; and, 4d. Music Practice: the practice of music to assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community music education”); 7c. Self & Creative practice: creating music and sonic narratives in the styles of narrative, prose or song lyrics.

Summary

As a person new to formal academic research studies,  I have been surprised with the number of occasions that I have been confronted by a range of thoughts, feelings, observations, recollections – positives and learnings – and highlighted behavioural patterns over the course of my life, relative to my music practice. Over the past few months I realised that I did not have in fact, the clearest understanding of who I was as a creative practitioner at this moment in time.  Therefore in order to try to anchor myself, I continue to develop my Charter of Values and Beliefs to maintain a valid contemporary values statement – a charter of values for both myself and my music practice at this time. In doing this, I am able to continue to gain new levels of understanding of my self and my practice, and start to apply them reflexively to my self and practice (see figure II below).

creative-practitioner-graphic_end-project-1-20161231-p1

Figure II – Project 1 Research Study Developed Approach (Page 2016d)
Engaging in this research study has allowed me to continue to develop my self, increase my self confidence, develop clarity regarding my practice, and increase my confidence with this task at hand as a practitioner with my Research Study Project 1. In short, it has allowed me to become a more holistic and balanced practitioner – an expanded practitioner (see figure III below).

creative-practitioner-graphic_more-holistic-balanced-practitioner-20161231-p2

Figure III – Project 1 Research Study Developed Approach (Page 2016e)

Next Step

I realise that as my Research Study Project continues and I gain more insight and greater clarity about my self and my practice, this document will require even more development. It remains a dynamic document that will continue to evolve, in line with my reflections and insights of my self interests, and my practitioner self interests.
This blog series is planned to continue next month with Research Practitioner Part 15. It is intended for this blog series to continue on a regular basis as I progress through my doctoral research project.
References
DLP 2016 image courtesy of David L Page. Accessed 27th November, 2016
 Onion image courtesy of: Onion Layers Accessed 28th March, 2015
Page, David 2016a QUT KKP622 Mid-Project 1 Research Study Progress Report submission draft Accessed April 24, 2016.
Page, David 2016b Research Practitioner Part 6  Accessed 27th November, 2016
Page, David 2016c  Project 1 Research Study Developed Praxis v8i  Created 27th November, 2016
Page, David 2016d  Project 1 Research Study Developed Approach Created 27th November, 2016
Page, David 2016e  Project 1 Research Study Developed Approach Created 27th November, 2016
Page, David 2015 QUT KKP603 Project Development in the Creative Industries submission DLP DCI Project Brief  Accessed 22nd April, 2016.
Research 2016 image courtesy of: Research Accessed 28th January 2016
Self Reflection 2016 image courtesy of: Self-reflection-for-personal-growth  Accessed 18th March, 2016.
– ©David L Page 27/11/2016
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

Memory – Introduction

QUT Industries logo

Context

The series of memory blogs that follow this Introductory blog are part of David L Page’s creative process – reflecting on selected significant events in the early stages of his life, and associating sonic and musical textures that best represent his memory of those significant events. The collection of associative memories will then be formed into a composition – The Dark Years: A Boy Who Was Beaten – which David L Page will produce as a fifteen (15) minute soundtrack of the first stage of his life. This cultural artefact is to make up one part of his Doctoral Project 1 submission. 

Doctoral Research Study Abstract

The aim of this Doctor of Creative Industries Research Project is to investigate both my DIY music practice and my self as a practitioner during the process of creating and producing a cultural artefact (EP).  My research study is designed to be a mixed-method qualitative study: a practice-based, ethnographic study that is to include a first-person narrative of my personal journey, critical reflection and reflexive practice, highlighting the co-constituted nature of my music practice. As an auto-ethnographic study, I designed the project for me to be performing the dual primary roles of being both the practitioner as subject, and the researcher. Such a multi-tiered examination represents a significant departure from current discussion of music practice, developing praxis of contemporary music practice. In this Project 1 research study exegesis submission I narrate the process to date, highlighting observation around my practitioner self, and my music practice and the emergent distinctions integrated into my developing music praxis.

Blog Posts as part of the Reflective Practice journaling process

Welcome to David L Page’s recollection of his story. 
These blogs are David’s attempt to share his recollection of the most significant events of the early stages of his life, as best as he can – events that David believes have shaped the development of his self, or the development of his musical self. 
The deep reflective practice process David engaged in as part of his creative practice, saw him over some time, situating himself back in time, delving deeper and deeper into the place and the event. Of course, as much as he could possibly do decades after an event, when so much distance has occurred in terms of time and place – David’s aim was to recall as much of the kinaesthetic, the auditory, the visual, the olfactory, or even the gustatory sensations of the particular time and place – of that particular significant event. This is not entirely a new experience for David, merely describing the process he has always intuitively put himself through in his creative practice endeavours, particularly in his music practice – creation, performance, or production. The difference in this research study is however, David had to learn how to more consciously focus in on the selected suite of significant events – at a scheduled time – to more deliberately situate him self back in time, whilst recording the data of each of his in-situation experiences.  
You will notice that the various blog posts – more often than not – David has included associated visuals or images, to accompany  the written text, along with the attached associative sonic and musical event. David’s intention was to be able to share his in-situation experience with his audience as much as he could.  David trust’s these blogs will appeal to either the kinaesthetic, the auditory, or the visual senses of the audience. With more advanced technology, or perhaps an alternative medium, David would like to – in the not too distant future – also share his in-situation olfactory and  gustatory sensation experience with his audience. 

David L Page’s Reflective Practice process

David requested for it to be noted: the output of each reflection of a significant event arrived as a result of a range of catalysts. David found his deep reflective re-expereinces occurred as a result of a range of catalysts used stimulate memory recall. These included: a calendar date; a visual image in a photo album for example, a book – quote, passage, or once just the cover – , a magazine – with handwritten notes in the borders, the internet – pictures or articles, or his vast stock of past writings – streams, prose in working, lyrics in working.  On a few occasions the catalyst was something David saw in life that reminded him of a time or place; at other times a blurred visual image or colour that reminded him of a past time, place, or event; at other times, a sonic texture he heard in his head situated him back in time; or by a sound he heard as he conducted himself in his every day life.  At other times, an old song or piece of music, a musical phrase or motif that triggered a memory – something in someone else’s composition, on occasion something he played on an instrument ; at other times, it was a smell – weather, forest, water, toilet freshener, food cooking; at other times, it was a taste – some deliberate, others by accident; and at other times, it was a feeling he had, and recalled a past time, place or event. On many occasions, it was while he was working in another form of practice, something was said or happened that triggered a memory. David noted these down on a phone message or in iNotes, to return to explore them to a greater depth when he had the time to reflect, and more deeply drill down into the particular event.
However, what ever the catalyst,  it was unusual for David not to have reverted to the written word at some point in this deep reflective process.  At the base of all of David’s practice, lies writing in some style, form, or medium. More often than not in practice, David engaged in streaming his consciousness onto the page – physical or virtual.   This streaming could have been just ramblings from his mind, not quite sure yet of what he wanted to say, but trusting he had to get it out, and down onto the page for some greater future benefit. All writings after all,  were to make up the wide range of data to be collected in this research study Project 1. Therefore, David made a special effort not to judge the merit or worth of that data at the time – in the moment of performance of his practice, at any particular time. He gathered it all. Often, emotions accompanied these streamings, deepening the in-situation experience. Sometimes these emotions were easily tapped; but most often David had to draw his self in over many hours, days, weeks or months, in order to arrive at what he could finally accept was the essence of that particular significant event. More often, possibly than David would like to admit, tears flowed as his in-stuation experience intensified, reassuring his self of the value and merit of this significant event and the particular in-situation experience, at that time.  Sometimes a narrative flowed out of this streaming in the form of a tale; at other times, as prose; at other times, as song-type lyrics; and at other times, distinctions regarding his self, or any one of the forms of his practice – be it creative, research – reflective and reflective, or education and learning. [for more information about a multi-faceted/multi-dimensional approach to practice, see  Research Practitioner Part 16   blog].
In terms of this Research Study Project – and most particularly – this series of deep reflective memory blogs – he observed that there was no particular order of the stimulations. On some occasions  David commenced in the digital audio workstation (DAW), composing from whatever memories he held of the significant event at the time – associating sonic or musical textures that he felt best represented those occasions, and assisted to return him to the in-stutation experience. At other times, David began in an excel chart, reflecting on the significant event, and allowing thoughts, feelings, images and aural events to return him to the in-stutation experience. On other occasions, David used the writing process to return him to the in-stutation experience. 
However, irrespective of what practice or what medium David commenced the deep reflective process, David recycled through most of these processes and mediums – usually multiple times – in no particular order. With each cycle, David deepened the level and intensity of experience, in order to arrive at a deep reflective in-stutation experience,  to gather the range of data for this research study Project 1. You will therefore observe in the following sixteen (16) blogs, a variety of layouts, formats, writing styles, graphics or images; along with accompanying links to an equally wide variety of associative sonic and musical textured events.
David’s hopes, as you join him in his journey back to the first stage of his life,  you will start to hear his voice emerge through the multi-modal narratives of these sixteen (16) significant events. He trusts you will get a sense of how David gains clarity of his self, as he gains a better understanding of his identity, musical identity,  and how his musical self developed over the first twenty years of his life. This research study was always to be an immersive study; a a first-person narrative of David L Page’s personal journey, critical reflection and reflexive practice, highlighting the co-constituted nature of his music practice.
We welcome you to his journey….. 
[NB: Included in each memory blog is a link/s to the associative sonic and musical textures that David feels best represent his in-situation memory of each of the particular significant events].

Message from David L Page

~DLP Pro Image Fun 5b small.20141020

Overview

In the early 1990’s I returned home to Australia following a very productive period in creative practice overseas “performing and writing, including recording and experimenting in production. It was a wonderful period for me – one that I hoped would never end” (Page 2014). I recall I arrived home with a new self-image in terms of my creative practice.
In an attempt to develop my practice for my next stage of life, I undertook a number of creative writing courses. The outcome of these programs were a number of pieces of prose, of key moments within my life while I was growing up [see for example, Boy].  A number of the instructors and peers at the time noted my ability to re-situate my self back into the moment of a past event, in some way re-experiencing that experience, in order to then write about it. It was a technique I had developed and practiced, already using this technique across some of the forms of creative writing I engaged in – streaming my consciousness and song lyrics. This technique applied to writing lyrics aligned with my desired confessional singer-songwriter role. A really positive outcome of these creative writing courses was not only the prose, but perhaps more so, my acceptance of this practice as a conscious, deliberate process that I could now apply to another form of my creative writing, prose.
In early 2014, as I was re-considering the focus of my Doctoral Research Study (I had already been accepted), I began brainstorming my journey as a music practitioner. I was very keen on reflecting on more eras, to recall:
how had I arrived at where I was at as a music practitioner?
what life experiences had influenced who I was, or wasn’t, as a music practitioner?
I wanted to articulate these key life experiences into a fluid narrative – my autobiography – of my journey to date. I did return to some of the prose written in the early 1990’s as well as other pieces of creative writing I had done at other times across my life. This reflective exploration took several months, resulting in the narrative overview, Music Practitioner Part 1 – Beginnings (MP Pt1 – Beginnings) blog. I would like it noted though: when I first started writing this autobiography, I had no thought or consideration about doing a soundtrack around my life’s significant events. I had considered at this stage that I would write in the style that I had always done – in an acoustic folk pop song musical style.
Fast forward to 2016 with me now engaged in my Project 1, some 25 months after I had written the MP Pt1 – Beginnings blog, In my search for a thematic idea for my compositions (songs), I started focussing in on more specific events across my life. This then led to another event, and then another, and then another. This process spanned approxiamtely four (4) to five (5) months, arriving as some thirty-five (35) significant events. I then considered how I was going to derive a musical project out of these significant events, arriving at the idea of focussing in on associative memories of each of the significant events. I would – through reflection – associate musical and sonic events for each of the significant event;  and then craft the sum of these associative memory events into a soundtrack as the cultural production output for my research study.  A musical and sonic collage of my life, if you like.
I knew a challenge for me was going to be to contain the length of the composition – short enough to maintain listener interest; and yet long enough to authentically represent the sum of these significant events. But with thirty-five (35) significant events, it was going to be too long a composition for one Project. I however noted that there was a natural division within the significant events of two time frames that I could possibly divide between my Research Study Project 1 and Project 2: up until twenty (20) years of age; and post-twenty (20) years of age. I decided that it would be logical to have Project 1 represent the associative memories of the first twenty (20) years of my life.
I started experimenting with some sonic events, directly inside the digital audio workstation (DAW). Whilst I gained confidence with my vision, I found that I easily lost focus within each event, and could create some musical or sonic events that were less authentic, less congruent to me of an associated memory. The blogs evolved as a way to more specifically focus in on a range of highlighted events, drawing my self into each of them to determine the actual particular significance of the event. I found by immersing my self into each event via a number of written forms (prose, lyrics, narrative), I could deepen the in-situation experience, and better recall a range of kinaesthetic, auditory, visual, olfactory, or even gustatory sensations of the particular significant event. After experimenting across a number of these significant events, I learnt to trust the physical and emotional responses of these in-situation re-experiences as they occurred. For me, the actual sixteen (16) significant events narrated are real. Whilst immersed in this creative practice, I noted experiences including an inability to breathe, shortness of breath, nausea, headaches and body pain. I relived experiences that brought up emotional responses such as joy, sorrow, fear, sadness, nervousness, loneliness, loss, and feelings of abandonment and shame whilst in-stuating my self within these significant events, and writing these blogs.  My planned research study was always to have been a first-person narrative of my personal journey: an emergent study, revealing aspects of my life I had not previously considered fully, or perhaps fully understood. I expected this journey was potentially going to be revealing, and at times, confronting, True to my expectations, it has been.
I trust that you as the reader can in some way experience my re-experiences of significant events within my personal journey, that I now choose to share.

full-2

Re-experiencing the experience 1

Re-experiencing the experience 1 ©David L Page 2016
Just now,
I realise how much stress I am under
as I delve back into my past,
reflecting on,
and writing about
a particular significant event
in the earliest stage of my life…..

 

 

Whilst writing,
I can feel the tension within
my jaw is tense,
I can feel a pulsing down the side of my head
my forearms and fingers are cramping,
I note I am quite out of breath,
I can hear my heart pumping,
as though I have a stethoscope on
listening with so much intent

 

re-experiencing the experience,
of a particular significant event,
immersing my self back in time,
into a deeply reflective in-situation experience,
at the earliest point of my (life) time…..

 

All of my senses are heightened,
the visual,
the auditory,
the smell,
the taste
the emotion I feel within my body,
everything moving in slow mo (tion),
every thing around….

 

re-experiencing the experience,
of a particular significant event,
immersing my self back in time,
into a deeply reflective in-situation experience,
at the earliest point of my (life) time…..

 

 

whilst in the moment
– performing if you like –
deep in the in-situation experience,
deeply reflecting,
in many ways, re-living,
re-expereincing the feeling and emotion
of the particular time, place and event

 

“What is that strange taste?”, I thought
as I instinctively wiped my chin,
snapping back into the current moment,
I realised I had vomited,
mainly within my mouth,
but with evidence down my front

 

 I stepped back
– out of my painting as such –
for a split second,
and considered how I possibly felt back then
in that particular significant event,
such a  long time ago

 

re-experiencing the experience,
of a particular significant event,
immersing my self back in time,
into a deeply reflective in-situation experience,
at the earliest point of my (life) time…..

 

All of my senses are heightened,
the visual,
the auditory,
the smell,
the taste
the emotion I feel within my body,
everything moving in slow motion,
every thing around….

 

I had many similar in-situation experiences,
over the past six months time,
all whilst undertaking this research study,
into the significant events that made up my life,
from Age 3 to Age 20,
in the formative stage
of my growing
up…
I welcome you to my journey
re-experiencing the experience,
of sixteen (16) particular significant events..

 

immersing my self back in time,
into a deeply reflective in-situation experience,
in order for me to gain a better understanding of
my self,
my identity,
my musical identity,
and how my musical self has developed
over the first twenty years of my life…..
(Page 2016a).

 

In-situation re-experiences (aka deep reflective practice)

In-situation re-experiences (aka deep reflective practice) ©David L Page 2017
As you read…
I welcome you to feel…
But of all of the feelings that you can embrace,
please do not feel sorrow or pity …
it is not the point of this journey
that I am taking my self on…
The point of this journey – this process – is for me….
to work through significant events of my life,
to date
to reconcile what I have done in my life,
against what it is that I have wanted to realise,
but have not been able to succeed in,
yet…

 

It is perhaps not surprising
for those who know me,
you understand I am grateful for who I am,
where I have been,
where I have come from…

 

I am here,
as a result of all that has gone before me…
all that I have been through

 

I know my tales are not perhaps
what you’ve heard in other’s
worldly tales of their complicated lives,
some so horrific,
you wander how they lived to tell it at all…

 

I certainly do not want to minimise
those real life stories of
genuine pain, suffering and hardship

 

I have had the blessing of living a privileged life
though, living true to my self
in certain areas of life,
still evades me …

 

and so, I choose not to
let go of this investigation,
my self-imposed intervention process,
my auto-ethnographic research study
with me playing the subject,
and the observer
of the self

 

after all, what is a life for?
gain more understanding of who you are,
and perhaps learn better,
what you are here (on earth) for….

 

there is something in my journey,
that has caused me to be unsettled
for as long as I recall,
it is the point of this journey
that I  am taking on
the study of my self…

 

The point of this journey – this process – is for me….
to work through significant events of my life,
to date
to reconcile what I have done in my life,
against what it is that I have wanted to realise,
but have not been able to realise,
yet…
Without endorsing any behaviours or acts,
that you may realise along my journey,
I know that I am stronger
as a result..

 

Through this process
I am trying to understand,
what brought me to where I stand today..

 

Nothing more, nothing less…

 

So I welcome you to proceed..
I welcome you to reflect on what I have lived,
and where I have been ..
If this helps you understand a little bit more of either,
me….
perhaps you (your self)….
or perhaps someone else…
in which you have crossed paths,
then all the better …..

 

I believe we are all in this thing called life together,
whatever one experiences…
Hopefully others can benefit from our stories,
with lessons to learn,
understandings to gain
for everyone …
So without taking more time out of your busy schedule
I welcome you to engage in…
into any number of episodes in the early stage of life
of me
(Page 2017).

onion-layers

The next blog in this Project 1 series is Memory – Age 2.
References
Onion image courtesy of: Onion Layers Accessed 28th March, 2015
Page, David L. 2017. “In situation re-experiences (aka deep reflective practice)” ©David L Page 2017
Page, David L. 2016a. “Re-experiencing the experience 1” ©David L Page 2016
Page, David L. 2016b.  Research Practitioner Part 16  Accessed 11th March, 2017
Page, David L. 2014.  Music Practitioner Part 1 – Beginnings  Accessed 11th March, 2017
Page, David L. 1991 Boy Accessed 11th March, 2017
Page, David L image courtesy of David L Page. Accessed 23rd October, 2016
Pulsating image courtesy of: Image Accessed 15th January, 2016
QUT Creative Industries image courtesy of:  Queensland University of Technology  Accessed 23rd October, 2016
– ©David L Page 24/10/2016
– updated ©David L Page 31/12/2016
– updated ©David L Page 11/03/2017
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.