Who I am……

David L Page logo.20141231.v2_resize4

(Page 2017a)

Me, myself, I – the multi-facetted/multi-dimensional practitioner

As described in my blog Research Practitioner Part 16 (Page 2017b), I am a multi-facetted/multi-dimensional practitioner – a practitioner across multiple practices of education & learning, research study commitments, creative practice, professional consulting practice and family responsibilities. I concluded that:
“All of my practice informs my self; and my self informs my practice – irrespective of the industry, the field, the discipline, or the site”(Page 2017c).

~DLP Pro Image Fun 5b small.20141020

(Page 2017g)

A broad definition of me, myself, I – the creative practitioner

You will note that in terms of creative practice, I refer to my self as a creative practitioner. I consciously choose to use this broad term, not specific to any particular discipline – as I see  my self as a creative being who likes to engage in a broad range – a very broad range – of creative practice. Whilst I love to engage in what I would classify as the primary focus of my creative practice – music and sound; listening, creating and performing –  music and sound alone does not define me. Being passionate about music and sound does not mean that I am not also passionate about other forms of creative practice. I am a multi-facetted person, with many diverse dimensions to who I am as a being, and in what I love to engage in. I engage in visual arts, in design, in film and animation.

Engagement with particular creative media platforms for particular purposes

I also engage in web, but I see this as not so much as a creative process where I am creating,  I see my engagement with web as a creative process in terms of function; curation for gathering resources to use as a practitioner; curation of resources to source inspiration; resources of others practice and/or viewpoints that assist me in the reflection process; to create a sense of identity – for my self, and for others; and, to market and distribute my creative practice.
As I indicated in my blog Media Identity & Curation Part 2 (Page 2014), I apply a diverse media strategy to include my media sites of:  about.me, gravatar.com, wordpress.com, tumblr.com, twitter.com, linked-in.com, myspace.com, facebook.com, pinterest.com, you-tube.com, soundcloud.com, instagram.com, lastfm.com, slideshare.com, googlescholar.com, academia.com and google.com. I use these media sites for quite specific purposes.
  • For example, David L Page wordpress.com (Page 2017d) allows me to communicate detail of my professional practice – as a creative practitioner/subject, as a education & learner practitioner, as a reflective practitioner, as a management practitioner, and as a a researcher/observer in any or all of these areas.

    wordpress-site-20160129

    (Page 2017d)
  • I use David L Page Pinterest.com (Page 2017e) to provide a curated static visual view of my multi-facetted self. I am a professional practitioner who loves diversity. I love culture, having been blessed to live across three diverse cultures to date – European Australian, Japanese, Indian. I have experienced many more cultures in my global travels. I love all things music and sound – audio, in terms of production (tracking), post-production, live and theory. I believe in the access of education for everyone (referred to as community education). I love performance. I love fast fun things. I love the environment. .. I love… I love…. I love… I love…..
    Pinterest Board Categories.20160306.P1b
(Page 2017e)
  • I use David L Page you-tube.com (Page 2017f) to provide a curated audio-visual view of my multi-facetted self. As indicated above, I am a professional practitioner who loves diversity, culture, all things music and sound, education for everyone, performance, comedy, or fast fun things.. I love diversity…. 
David L Page You-tube channel.201706011
(Page 2017f)

Engagement with particular creative media mediums dictates what cultural productions I engage in

How I engage in media depends upon what cultural production – what cultural artifact – I will engage in at any particular time. Depending upon the medium I choose to listen to music or soundtracks will depend upon what I choose to listen to. Am I going to use the internet to stream; an iPod; a CD player – in a house, or a CD player in a car; a car radio; a portable tape player; a cheap record player; a high-end stereo system; or a high end 5.1 surround sound hi-fi system?
It is the same situation for visual arts and design. Depending upon the medium I choose to view visual arts and design will depend upon what I choose to view. on a small screen device such as an iPhone; via a static image platform such as Pinterest.com; via an audio-visual dynamic image platform such as you-tube.com; in a small art gallery with physical visual art or graphic displays; in a large National art gallery with physical visual art or graphic displays?
It is the same situation for film. Depending upon the medium I choose to watch film will depend upon what I choose to watch: on a portable small screen device such as an iPhone; a portable smallish screen device such as a laptop; on a small screen TV; on a large screen TV with a hi-fi 5.1 surround system; in a local suburban cinema; in a surround sound movie theatre equipped with dolby; or an outdoor drive in movie theatre with a window mono speaker system?
As a creative practitioner, I have listed examples below of media across four (4) disciplines and how I view them. Providing examples of four (4) different creative media disciplines I believe enables me to make my point of how engagement with particular creative media mediums very much dictates what cultural productions I actually engage in at any point in time.

~Music_staff Blue

(AE 2015a)
1. 4 different listening behaviours I exhibit:
  • eg 1: Pink Floyd’s “Dark Side of the Moon” for me, is best listened in the medium of an album, played on a HiFi record player system, in one sitting, in a comfortable chair, with ambient/subdued lighting (lava lamps etc), at the end of a day. Strict rule – no talking during each side… Flipping the album from side 1 to side 2 is the opportunity to have a break if one needs;

Dark Side of the Moon_Pink Floyd.1973

(Pink Floyd 1973)
  • eg 2: Tim Buckley’s “Greetings from LA” must be played as a full album, in sequence , in one go. I do not mind what medium I listen to it on (album on stereo, cassette tape, on itunes in car system, studio system, or on laptop/desktop/ipod/iphone via studio quality headphones) BUT MUST be listened to in sequence, at one time! (not negotiable);

Greetings From LA_Tim_Buckley.1972

(Buckley 1972)
  • eg 3: Where I did not buy the artist’s songs as an album, or I did, but I have never or have infrequently listened to it as a continuous complete album, I am happy to play the songs randomly in a multi-artist, multi-genre playlist via any medium (generally on itunes in car system, studio system, or on laptop/desktop/ipod/iphone via studio quality headphones);
  • eg 4: ambient music, or dance music for me is about a soundtrack to my life at that moment in time, supporting my emotional or physical state at that time, or my desired emotional or physical state at that time. I am happy to play the songs randomly in a multi-artist, signle-genre playlist via any medium (generally on itunes in car system, studio system, or on laptop/desktop/ipod/iphone via studio quality headphones).
    John Olsen_Sydney Sun [or King Sun] 1965, National Gallery of Australia © John Olsen.jpg(Olsen 2017)
2. 4 different visual arts and design viewing behaviours I exhibit:
  • eg 1: traditional art – physical paintings, etc – I do like to see in an art gallery, particularly a curated art gallery with a theme, or an artist’s works.. I like taking time to wander around in a relaxed stated;
  • eg 2: In saying that, I usually also like to have copies of my favourite works electronically (desktop pictures, pinterest, etc) to see and remind myself of that experience in the art gallery;
  • eg 3: I do view traditional art – physical paintings, etc – in coffee table books, but generally to see and remind myself of that experience in the art gallery…. eg 4: virtual design is ok on most modern mediums (laptop, desktop, etc). However in saying this, I tend not to view on smaller virtual devices such as iphones, as images gets lost/loses visual impact for me being so small, etc;
  • eg 4: Functional design, such as promotional or marketing brochures for me are best in a physical tactile state. i like to pour over them, digest them, turn the page, revisit the previous page, perhaps circle or add notes around the borders of the text that I may be attracted to, and have further questions about. I tend to want to engage physically with these mediums;
  • eg 5: virtual creative, artistic design is ok on most modern mediums (laptop, desktop, etc). However in saying this, I tend not to view on smaller virtual devices such as iphones, as images gets lost/loses visual impact for me being so small, etc.
3.4 different film viewing behaviours I exhibit:
  • eg 1: I most like watching feature movies on a movie theatre wide screen and sound system. However, I mostly watch them on my 65″ home TV with sound system – for convenience. For me, watching movies is a shared experience, watching with someone. I do not like watching animation movies on laptops or small screen for both the limited visual and audio experience, but mainly for the lack of watching in a relaxed shared experience environment. An example of a movie that i have seen in these conditions would be “Shawshank Redemption”;

Shawshank Redemption_CastleRockEntertainment.1994.jpg

(Entertainment, Castle Rock. 1994)
  • eg 2: Certain movies eg (original) “Point Break”, “Star Wars” are a cinematic experience, and lose a great detail of impact for me when not watched in cinema, but on my home TV system;
  • eg 3: Where I want to view a trailer to see if I am interested in watching it in full, I am happy to watch them on alternate mediums such as a laptop or desktop
  • eg 4: Certain movies eg “Blair Witch Project” I believe benefit from being watched on alternate mediums such as a laptop or desktop as this smaller – more intimate? individual? secretive? -medium lends itself more to the intent of the narrative in my opinion.
4. 3 different animation viewing behaviours I exhibit:
  • eg 1: I most like watching feature animation movies on a movie theatre wide screen and sound system. However, I mostly watch them from the second or third time via a DVD on my 65″ home TV with sound system – for convenience. “Lion King” is a good example of this. For me – now – “Lion King” is best listened to (note, not necessairly watched) in one go. It can be in background playing as i am working. In one particular period when i was working home over a three (3) month period, I recall “Lion King” was playing in the background on repeat, all day, every day for those three (3) months;

    The Lion King_Walt Disney Pictures.1994

    (Disney 1994)
  • eg 2: I most like watching animation movies (eg Disney or Pixar) on a movie theatre wide screen and sound system. However, I mostly watch them on my 65″ home TV with sound system – for convenience. I do not like watching animation movies on laptops or small screen for both the limited visual and audio experience;
  • eg 3: Where there are short animations (3 minute Pixar), I am happy to watch them on alternate mediums such as a laptop or desktop, just to entertain myself for a short moment to lift my mood, distract me, etc.
5. x different games viewing behaviours I exhibit:
  • eg 1: No contribution possible. mes not a gameboy!!!

Conclusion

What creative media medium I engage with will dictate to a degree what cultural production – what cultural artifact – I will engage in at any particular time.  As a creative practitioner, I have provided examples across four (4) disciplines of how I may engage in particular creative media mediums, dictating what cultural productions – what cultural artifacts – I engage in at any point in time.
I love many, varied forms of creative media,  In my personal situation  have access to many, varied creative media mediums:  the internet; an iPod; a CD player – in a house, or a CD player in a car; a car radio; a portable tape player; a cheap record player; a high-end stereo system; or a high end 5.1 surround sound hi-fi system; a small screen device such as an iPhone; a laptop; a desktop; static image platform such as Pinterest.com; via an audio-visual dynamic image platform such as you-tube.com; a small art gallery with physical visual art or graphic displays; a large National art gallery with physical visual art or graphic displays; a small screen TV; a large screen TV with a hi-fi 5.1 surround system; a local suburban cinema; in a surround sound movie theatre equipped with dolby; or an outdoor drive in movie theatre with a window mono speaker system. Most of us in western countries have many, varied options and access in this era.
The mediums one chooses to access media through, could therefore dictate what media you actually engage in.
  • How do you access creative media?
  • How does this inform what cultural production – what cultural artifact – you choose to engage in at any point in time?
References
AE 2015a Music note montage in the universe image courtesy of: Angelic Exorcism (AE) Studio Projects  Accessed 11th March 2015
Buckley, Tim. 1972. Greetings from LA. Straight Records. Vinyl LP.
Disney, Walt. 1994. The lion king. Walt Disney Feature Animation. DVD.
DLP 2017a image courtesy of David L Page  Accessed 11th June, 2017
DLP 2017g image courtesy of David L Page Accessed 11th June, 2017
Entertainment, Castle Rock. 1994. The shawshank redemption. Colombia Pictures. DVD.
Olsen 2017 image courtesy of Sydney Sun [or King Sun] 1965, National Gallery of Australia © John Olsen  Accessed 11th June, 2017
Page, David L. 2017b Research Practitioner Part 16 Accessed 11th June, 2017
Page, David L. 2017c Research Practitioner Part 18 Accessed 11th June, 2017
Page, David L. 2017d  David L Page wordpress.com  Accessed 11th June, 2017
Page, David L. 2017e  David L Page Pinterest.com  Accessed 11th June, 2017
Page, David L. 2017f David L Page you-tube.com  Accessed 11th June, 2017
Page, David L. 2014 Media Identity & Curation Part 2  Accessed 11th June, 2017
Floyd, Pink. 1973. Dark side of the moon. Harvest. Vinyl LP.
– ©David L Page 11/06/2017
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

SaveSave

SaveSave

Advertisements

Doctoral Pilot Study – Part 13a

Doctorate of Creative Industries Project 1

research

(Research 2017)

Precis

Continuing on from my previous blogs in this series, I find my self now in a process of reflective practice. In much the same way as described in my education & learning practice session blog (see Layer 10: Reflective practice following the learning practice), I am away from the site of that last reflective practice, with some considerable time – eleven (11) days -having lapsed post-my December reflective practice session. As a not uncommon occurrence of this second stage of reflective practice, I am experiencing a separation of the expected automated response that could be activated by reflecting on the practice of December’s reflective practice, that I find my self now engaging in. The amount of time expired between that actual practice session and this reflective practice session has allowed my mind to turn over the distinctions I gained in redeveloping my Charter of Values and Beliefs. I am finding that I have distilled out the less significant events, and now focussing on the more prominent and significant aspects of that development. The primary entry I find my self now focussing on is:
2d. Self & Practice: a complex multi-dimensional approach to practice 

Research Study Project 1 music practice and my music practitioner self

As I continue with my music practice as part of my research study, I have observed that quite often I am distracted by my other forms of practice – either my research practice (researching, investigating, analysing or reflecting) or my education & learning practice (recalling processes I undertake in preparing for, and delivering my education & learning practice sessions – both of creative media learners, and of aspiring educator peers). I often find myself being drawn into these other forms of practice quite unexpectedly to my original intended focus of practice as scheduled.
I have observed these distractions – unexpected mindful wanderings – usually commences on-site and in practice. It often starts with my noting my thoughts and/or my feelings during practice. This reflection then often progresses into further reflection, where I find myself drilling down to illuminate possible reasons for such a distraction at that particular time or stage of practice. In doing so, the act of reflection effectively causes the practice to cease and therefore becomes on-site and on practice. Any ongoing engagement in this process generally has me wandering away from the site to continue reflecting on my practice. Whilst I outlined this process in my July 2015 Music Practitioner Part 3 blog, I expressed my concern of the disruption this subject/observer phenomena could have on the creative practice flow in my Research Practitioner Part 5 blog in the early stages of my Project 1 study. However, on the back of recently completing the update of my Charter of Values and Beliefs – a holistic guide of my self, life with application across the varied  forms of my practice, I am now reviewing my perspective. Do I continue to see a disruption to one form of practice, for reflection or performance of another form of practice, as a disruption.  The word disruption has an inbuilt negative connotation within my mind, having one’s focus or attention forced away from one form of practice, to another form of practice. But I am now less sure of my view of this disruption being a negative process, or actually part of a more holistic integrated process. A necessary attribute of a more holistic self and multi-dimensional practitioner self. A multi-facetted practitioner self that incorporates multiple aspects of our practitioner selves.

The multi-facetted/multi-dimensional practitioner

Over the course of the past eleven (11) days, despite being on leave from my current primary income source of education & learning practice, with a very strict schedule outlined to develop my research study Project 1 – specifically the music practice creative component of a composition of my associative memories – I have observed that I have spent a significant amount of time reflecting on my last trimester of 2016 education & learning practice. Whilst this is in itself not a bad thing, I have found myself continually perplexed as to why it continues to happen.
I find central to this reflection is the self. I have noted that whenever I commence consideration of any form of practice I engage in, I find that the reflection process – planned or unplanned – progresses consistently back to the self. Having engaged in this auto-ethnographic study for just over a twelve month process to date, I have found that this occurrence is now predictable – if not predictably unpredictable. Perhaps not surprising, my values regarding professional practice and self include:
6a.Self & Professional Practice: I value diversity of orientation in my professional practice [Value].
6b. Self & Professional Practice: In my life I value reflection – regular conscious interrogative introspection in order to consider, critically analyse and appraise my self and my practice [Value].
6c. Self & Professional Practice: In my life I value ongoing development – constant and never-ending reflexive practice, in order to maintain proactive development of my self and my practice [Value].
6d. Self & Professional Practice: I value varied motives of practice such as:
    • Discovery (to use music practice as a medium for exploring, attempting to do something which you haven’t done previously);
    • Technically (to technically develop one’s skills);
    • Social (to connect to others);
    • Affectively (to express or connect to emotion);
    • Aesthetically (for expression or engagement in something artistic or of beauty);
    • Creatively (for action, just to do);
    • Physical (for physical expression, for exercise];
    • Commercial (for income generation purposes);
    • Educational (to demonstrate specific practice to my students, live or in preparation);
    • Cathartic (for self-development or intervention purposes. For me to connect with my emotions – to notice, to reflect, to acknowledge the emotion, and their significance, to work through that emotional experience – to deal with specific and/or significant events, and hopefully in doing so, move beyond certain emotions associated with these significant events, developing my self);
    • Performance (to maximise my performance standard, and what others get to see of me/ practice);
    • Nurturing (core to my Charter of Values is nurturing – nurturing of self and others. I demonstrate in my education & learning practice; nurturing of both others (eg when I am ‘performing’ either a} and myself in my creative practice; and nurturing of myself in my research practice).
6e. Self & Professional Practice: In my life I value nurturing of my self and others – across my areas of my practice (family, music, education, research, practice) as appropriate [Value].

What I have found as a by-product of my twelve (12) month research study Project 1

I engage passionately in all forms of my multi-faceted practice, consisting of creative practice, research practice, or education & learning practice. After much observation, I now accept that the self informs my multi-faceted practice of creative practice, research practice, or education & learning practice – conceptually and literally. My multi-faceted practice of creative practice, research practice, or education & learning practice in turn informs/contributes to the self, even if that contribution is only with increased clarity around that particular practice, which in turn increases confidence within the self. I have observed within the self, that this increase in confidence in turn informs and/or shapes my practice – irrespective of what practice I am about to engage in – my creative practice, my research practice, or my education & learning practice. Over the course of the twelve (12) month research study Project 1, I have observed this cycle of interdependency and commonality between the self – my self – and the various incarnations of my practice – creative practice, research practice, or education & learning practice.
DLPs Multi-faceted Practitioner.20170212.P4
Figure I – Project 1 Research Study Developed Approach (Page 2017)

Core principles of the multi-facetted/multi-dimensional practitioner

  1. I devote my time to all forms of practice, irrespective of what practice that is;
  2. My weekly schedule outlines what I need to realise;
  3. My self guides me to what practice I need to do at that moment in time;
  4. My self informs all forms of my practice;
  5. All of my multiple forms of practice inform my self;
  6. This situation aligns to my Charter of Values – freedom

~DLP Pro Image 1.20141020

(DLP 2016)
7. I apply this approach to all forms of practice in my life:
    • being spontaneous
    • being flexible
    • being proactive
    • my self guides me to what I need to do, when I need to reflect, to research, to create, to practice, whatever I need to learn, what ever I need to become, what ever I need to realise……
8. I apply this approach to all forms of practice in my life, as evidenced by the past twelve (12) months whilst undertaking this research study, Project 1.
9. Whilst I am interested in all of my forms of practice, I am particularly focussed on observing how this cycle of interdependence can bring benefit to the central theme of this research study, my music practice. I therefore, by definition practice reflective practice across all forms of my practice.
10. In order to develop all forms of my practice, I therefore necessarily engage in reflexive practice across all forms of my varied practice. My belief is: since all forms of practice inform my self, which in turn can inform all forms of my practice – by developing any aspect of either my self, or any of my forms of practice, I am potentially, likely, to develop any and all aspects of my self and/or my practice. As Deming refers to it – constant, and never ending change.
The Art of self-reflection
(Self Reflection 2016)

Summary

As a person new to formal academic research studies,  I have been surprised with the number of occasions that I have been confronted by a range of thoughts, feelings, observations, recollections – positives and learnings – and highlighted behavioural patterns over the course of my life, relative to my music practice. Over the past few months I realised that I did not have in fact, the clearest understanding of who I was as a creative practitioner at this moment in time.  Therefore in order to try to anchor myself, I continue to develop my Charter of Values and Beliefs to maintain a valid contemporary values statement – a charter of values for both myself and my music practice at this time. In doing this, I am able to continue to gain new levels of understanding of my self and my practice, and start to apply them reflexively to my self and practice.
Engaging in this research study has allowed me to continue to develop my self, increase my self confidence, and develop clarity regarding my practice. It is my intention – through reflective and reflexive practice – to increase my confidence with this task at hand as a practitioner with my Research Study Project 1. In short, following such practice process has allowed me to become a more holistic and balanced practitioner; or as I refer to it, an expanded practitioner (see figure I above).

Next Step

I realise that as my Research Study Project continues and I gain more insight and greater clarity about my self and my practice, this document will require even more development. It remains a dynamic document that will continue to evolve, in line with my reflections and insights of my self interests, and my practitioner self interests.
This blog series is planned to continue next month with Research Practitioner Part 17. It is intended for this blog series to continue on a regular basis as I progress through my doctoral research project.
References
DLP 2016 image courtesy of David L Page. Accessed 28th November, 2016
Page, David 2016 Research Practitioner Part 14 Accessed 28th November, 2016.
Page, David 2017 Project 1 Research Study Developed Approach Created 11th January, 2017
Research 2017 image courtesy of: Research Accessed 28th January, 2016
Self Reflection 2016 image courtesy of: Self-reflection-for-personal-growth  Accessed 18th March, 2016.
Walton, Mary. 1988. Deming management method. London: Penguin.
– ©David L Page 11/01/2017
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

Memory – Age 20 Part 2

Brett Whitely.P5
(Kent 2012)
This is another in-situated recollection of what I consider to have been a significant event in my life, when I was Age 20.

Herein, after…..

Herein, after …..(passage to the afterlife))©David L Page 2016
Verse 1: What I knew has vanished all around
My world has turned inside out
there is over here, and here is over there
I am dizzy from the spinning
What’s this all about?

 

Verse 2: The oceans have parted, and sucked me in ….
I can feel it forcing its way down on top of me..
I have strained every muscle trying to withstand it
my chest is caving in, I can’t breathe
my down is up, and my up is down
The Big Blue.P2(The Big Blue 1988)
Verse 3: Seconds pass like hours
my arms explode from the load
my chest gives in to the pressure,
the weight of a thousand houses hits me
I can see my own blood flow

 

Verse 4: I swallow an entire ocean
And start to float upward like seaweed
Fish swim past not knowing
who I am, where I have been

Whale shark

Verse 5: I can no longer feel a thing..
No breath, no sensation,
no pins or needles, no pain
a seahorse swims past not knowing
who I am, where I have come from

 

Chorus: something happened,
I am not aware of
my down is up, and my up is down
the sea swims past not knowing
who I am, where I have come from

Underwater Image.P2

(Peterson 2017)
I float like a leaf in a winter breeze
my time (in the after life) has just begun….
my world turned upside down
my down is up, and my up is down
my arms gave in, my chest gave out
my time (in the after life) has just begun….
Now my down is up, and my up is down
Now my down is up, and my up is down
Now my down is up, and my up is down
I float off now….
Never ….
to ….
be …..
found….
Page, David L. 2016. “Herein, after (passage to the afterlife)” ©David L Page 2016.  This audio event represents a developed sense of my recollection of this significant event. 
Celestial Galaxy.P1
Whilst this the last blog in this Project 1 series chronologically, there is one more written. See here for Memory – Age 15
The next blog in the Project 2 series is Memory – Age 21.
References
Big Blue, The. 1988. The Big Blue  Accessed 2nd January, 2017
Celestial Galaxy image courtesy of: Celestial Galaxy Accessed 2nd January, 2017
Herein, after (passage to the afterlife) …. audio link courtesy of: David L Page  Accessed 2nd January, 2017
Kent, Harry. 2012. Brett Whiteley’s Ghost  Accessed 2nd January, 2017
Page, David L. 2017. Memory – Age 15  Accessed 3rd April, 2017
Page, David L. 2016. “Herein, after (passage to the afterlife)” ©David L Page 2016
Page, David L 2014a  David L Page’s About.me  Accessed 16th October, 2014
Peterson, Allan. 2012. Underwater Cathedral Light image courtesy of: Allan Peterson Accessed 2nd January, 2017
Underwater Fish image courtesy of: Underwater scene Accessed 2nd January, 2017
– ©David L Page 09/12/2016
– updated ©David L Page 02/01/2017
– updated ©David L Page 30/01/2017
– updated ©David L Page 03/04/2017
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

SaveSave

Doctoral Pilot Study – Part 11b

Doctorate of Creative Industries Project 1

research

(Research 2016)

Precis

Continuing on from my previous blogs in this series; as I am now at the end of my second year of my post-graduate academic research studies, I felt it is important to revisit and develop my Charter of Values and Beliefs v1 of goals, values and beliefs for both myself and my music practice.
I have taken the liberty to re-post my findings at the end of Year 1 as I have gained considerable more insight relative to the last post I made on the 25th April 2016.
The Art of self-reflection
(Self Reflection 2016)
Over the course of the seven (7) months of life, music practice and reflective practice, I have crystallised my thoughts and understandings, and gained fresh levels of clarity about my self and practice. The most notable development to the Year 1 (2015) Charter of Values and Beliefs v1 was over the last quarter of this year, in my efforts to balance full-time work and full-time research study commitments, and family responsibilities, I became quite stressed. In re-reading my Charter, I reassessed the order and priority of my item 1b. In the original 2015 description I had listed 1b as being:
1b. Self: I strive to be balanced, to be a balanced, functional human being – affective, expressive and communicative – mentally, physically, spiritually [Goal]. Whilst being very busy, I believe I have balance in my life. I believe I am a balanced, functional human being – affective, expressive and communicative – mentally, physically, spiritually [Belief]
However, over the last three months of 2016 I appraised my self as being anything but balanced. I have now reflected and found that this imbalance has come as a result of choosing to overlook the balance of my spiritual, physical and mental being.
In the 2015 listing, I had ordered the three areas of priority as being mentally, physically and spiritually. However, in reflecting on these areas, I realised that their priority was incorrect for me, and my priority was in fact the reverse order of this: spirituality was my highest priority, followed by physical, and then followed by intellectual – mental. In my addressing my imbalance, by focussing on the order of these in terms of spiritual, physical and mental I quickly returned to a greater degree of balance.
As I had essentially looked over the spiritual aspect in my original Charter, I recognised the oversight of this, and therefore I added some additional points in, including 1b for example.
1b. Self: In life, I value a spiritual approach to life – to experience, to learn, and to develop respect and acceptance [Value]. I strive to maintain spiritual balance within my life – to experience, to learn, and to develop respect and acceptance [Goal]. I believe we are spiritual beings, engaging in a human experience. I believe my human journey is to resolve the limitations, contradictions and inconsistencies of being human – to experience, to learn, and to develop respect and acceptance – and to engage congruently within the physical world [Belief]. [see *Note above].
I remain surprised with the number of occasions that I have been confronted by a range of thoughts, feelings, observations, recollections – positives and learnings – and highlighted behavioural patterns over the course of my life, relative to my music practice. Over the past seven (7) months of embarking on my research study, I have increasingly developed a clearer understanding of who I am as a self, and as a creative practitioner. No doubt this view is likely to continue to develop as I progress with my research study, but given I was nearing the completion of Project 1, I felt it was timely to update my Charter of Values and Beliefs.

~DLP Pro Image 1.20141020

(DLP 2016)

DLP’s Charter of Values and Beliefs v2

onion-layers

Year 1 Research Study Part 1a – who I know I am now

1a. Self: In life, I value a holistic perspective [Value]. I strive to consider life from a global holistic perspective [Goal]. I believe I consider my life and varied forms of practice from a global holistic perspective [Belief]
1b. Self: In life, I value a spiritual approach to life – to experience, to learn, and to develop respect and acceptance [Value]. I strive to maintain spiritual balance within my life – to experience, to learn, and to develop respect and acceptance [Goal]. I believe we are spiritual beings, engaging in a human experience. I believe my human journey is to resolve the limitations, contradictions and inconsistencies of being human – to experience, to learn, and to develop respect and acceptance – and to engage congruently within the physical world [Belief]. [see *Note below].
1c. Self: In life, I value balance [Value].I strive to be balanced, to be a balanced, functional human being – affective, expressive and communicative – spiritually, physically and mentally [Goal]. Whilst being very busy, I believe I have balance in my life. I believe I am a balanced, functional human being – affective, expressive and communicative – spiritually, physically and mentally [Belief]
[*Note: though I became quite imbalanced over the last three months of 2016, by choosing to overlook the balance of my spiritual, physical and mental being. I am happy to report though, this balance has mostly returned by the close of the year].
1d. Self: In life, I value diversity of orientation [Value]. I am very end product/goal-orientated with actions; and I also very process-orientated with expression and reflection [Goal].Being contrast orientated, I believe I have a great opportunity in life. I believe I am target-orientated and effective and efficient in realising personal goals: I believe I do not waiver from my focus. However along the journey, I believe I am process-orientated in my expression and reflection. I believe I immerse my self in the process [Belief] [see *Note above].
1e. Self: In life, I value physical connection [Value. I strive for physical connection in everything I do [Goal]. I believe I am a physical being – a tactile being, a kinesthetic being, a sensual being [Belief] [see *Note above].
1f. Self: In life, I value an open intellect/mindfulness [Value]. I strive to approach life with an open and inquiring mind [Goal]. I believe I approach most aspects of my life with an open and inquiring mind, applying thought and mindfulness [Belief]
1g. Self: In life, I value emotion [Value]. I strive to be emotionally connected [Goal]. I believe I am an affected being [Belief][see *Note above].
1h. Self: In life, I value joy [Value]. I strive to be connected to joy and happiness [Goal]. I believe I am a joyful being [Belief][see *Note above].
1i. Self: I value a sincere and deep level of engagement with others [Value]. I aspire to engaging with others in a sincere way, and to a deep level of engagement with others [Goal]. I believe I engage with others in a sincere way, and to a deep level of engagement with others – in a genuine and congruent manner [Belief][see *Note above].
1j. Self: I value nurturing as a human quality [Value].I aspire to be a nurturing soul [Goal]. I believe I am a nurturing soul [Belief] [see *Note above].

onion-layers

Year 1 Research Study Part 1b – who I know I am now as a practitioner

2a. Self & Practice: In my life I value self-reliance [Value]. I aspire to being self-reliant [Goal]. I believe I am able to be self-reliant in most aspects of my life, but choose to, or not to as I see appropriate [Belief][see *Note above].
2b. Self & Practice: I value a high standard of practice [Value]. I aspire to execute a high standard of practice [Goal]. I believe I operate at a high standard of practice in most areas of my life [Belief].
2c. Self & Practice: I value a high volume of post-training practice (10,000 hours) in order to develop a professional level of knowledge and skill in that practice [Value]. In any form of new practice I choose to learn, I set the goal on 10,000 hours of post-training practice in order to develop a professional level of knowledge and skill in that practice [Goal]. The forms of practice I have developed a professional level of knowledge and skill in, is the result of having invested 10,000 hours of post-training practice [Belief].
2d. Self & Practice: I value diversity of orientation in my practice [Value]. I am very end product/goal-orientated with actions; and I also very process-orientated with expression and reflection [Goal]. Being contrast orientated, I believe I have a great opportunity in life. I believe I am target-orientated, effective and efficient in realising goals for my practice: I believe I do not waiver from the output focus for that practice. However within practice, I believe I immerse my self in the process of practice with my expression and reflection [Belief] [see *Note above].
2e. Self & Practice: I value a complex multi-dimensional approach to practice [Value]. I aspire to execute a complex multi-dimensional approach within my practice [Goal]. I believe I execute a complex multi-dimensional approach within my practice [Belief].
2f. Self & Practice: I value spontaneity (being spontaneous = freedom for DLP) [Value]. I aspire to spontaneously – effortlessly, naturally – alter my practice as I see fit/appropriate [Goal]. I believe I operate in a spontaneous manner – effortlessly, naturally, within my practice [Belief].
2g. Self & Practice: In my life I value being prepared [Value]. I aspire to being prepared in all situations, facilitating optimum engagement and maximizing the opportunity of an optimum experience for others [Goal]. I believe I prepare thoroughly for my practice, facilitating optimum engagement and maximizing the opportunity of an optimum experience for others. I believe such preparation is an integral part of the practice process [Belief] [see *Note above].
2h Self & Practice: In my life I value appearing to be in a relaxed state [Value]. I aspire to appearing to be in a relaxed state in all situations, enabling the execution of what appears to be an effortless/natural/automatic high level of practice; in turn facilitating optimum engagement and maximizing the opportunity of an optimum experience for others [Goal]. I believe I prepare thoroughly for my practice, prior to practice, in order to be in a relaxed stated at the time of public practice (ie the performance). Being in this state in turn facilitates optimum engagement and maximizes the opportunity of an optimum experience for others. I believe such a relaxed state in public performance is a key element of the practice process [Belief] [see *Note above].
2i. Self & Practice: I value practice that provides opportunities for nurturing [Value]. I aspire to practice that provides opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Goal]. I believe I engage in practice that provides opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Belief][see *Note above].

onion-layers

Year 1 Research Study Part 1c – who I know I am as a practitioner

3a. Social and Cultural contexts: I value social and cultural diversity [Value]. I strive to live across a very wide and broad range of social and cultural contexts – countries and cultures in my life [Goal]. I believe I embrace a very wide and broad range of of social and cultural contexts – countries and cultures in my life [Belief].
3b. Social and Cultural contexts: I value equal opportunity for all – irrespective of gender, race, sexual preference, impairment [Value]. I strive to provide equitable levels of service and practice for all – irrespective of gender, race, sexual preference, impairment [Goal].I believe I assist people by providing equitable levels of service and practice for all – irrespective of gender, race, sexual preference, impairment [Belief].
3c. Social and Cultural contexts: I value opportunity for all for learning and development to navigate their life  – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… (what I refer to as “community education”) [Value]. I strive to assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life –  their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community education”) [Goal]. I believe I assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community education”) [Belief].
3d. Social and Cultural contexts: I value opportunities in contexts that provide opportunities for nurturing [Value]. I aspire to practice in contexts that provides opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Goal]. I believe I engage in practice in contexts which provides opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Belief].

onion-layers

Year 1 Research Study Part 1d – who I know I am as a music practitioner

4a. Music Practice: I value diversity of orientation in my practice [Value]. I strive to exercise both a goal-orientation (product), and a process-orientation (process) with my music practice [Goal].Being contrast orientated, I believe there is a great opportunity in my music practice. I believe my target-orientation allows me to effectively and efficiently realise goals for my music practice, not wavering from the output focus for that music practice. However within my music practice, I believe I immerse my self in the process of the music practice with my expression and reflection for creative benefit [Belief].
4b. Music Practice: I value social and cultural diversity of music style [Value].I strive to experience and be influenced by a very wide and broad range of diversity of music styles in my life [Goal]. I believe I am open to experience and be influenced by a very wide and broad range of diversity of music styles [Belief].
4c. Music Practice: I value the practice of music in a supportive environment or culture [Value]. I strive to practice music in a supportive culture and environment in my life [Goal]. I believe I practice music in a supportive culture and environment [Belief]
4d. Music Practice: I value the practice of music to assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community music education”) [Value]. I strive to practice music to assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community music education”) [Goal]. I believe the practice of music can assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community music education”) [Belief]. I believe I practice music to assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community music education”) [Belief].
4e. Music Practice: I value the practice of music which provide opportunities for nurturing [Value]. I aspire to practice music which provides opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Goal]. I believe I engage in the practice of music to provide opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Belief]. I believe I practice music in a manner that is nurturing (of both my self and others) [Belief].

onion-layers

Year 1 Research Study Part 1e – who I know I am as a music practitioner

5a. Composition & Performance: I value diversity of orientation in my composition and performance practice [Value]. I strive to exercise both a goal-orientation (product), and a process-orientation (process) with my composition and performance practice [Goal]. Being contrast orientated, I believe there is a great opportunity in my composition and performance practice. I believe my target-orientation allows me to effectively and efficiently realise goals for my composition and performance practice, not wavering from the aim and objective focus for that practice. However within that practice, I believe I immerse my self in the process of the composition and performance practice with my expression and reflection for creative benefit. I believe I am in the moment during that practice [Belief].
5b. Composition & Performance: I value compositions combining a range of music and sonic textures, appropriate to the music style [Value]. I strive to create compositions integrating a range of music and sonic textures into all of my compositions and performances, appropriate to the music style [Goal]. I believe I integrate a range of music and sonic textures into all of my compositions and performances, appropriate to the music style [Belief].
5c. Composition & Performance: I value compositions combining a range of music and sonic textures, woven together in a holistic cohesive manner [Value]. I strive as a music practitioner to create and play compositions combining a range of music and sonic textures, woven together in a holistic cohesive manner [Goal]. I believe as a music practitioner, I create and play compositions combining a range of music and sonic textures, woven together in a holistic cohesive manner [Belief].
5d. Composition & Performance: I value performing the instruments and musical parts I play, in and around other instruments, integrating/gluing all of the instrumental music and sonic textures together [Value]. I strive to perform the instruments and musical parts I play, in and around other instruments, integrating/gluing all of the instrumental music and sonic textures together [Goal]. I believe I perform the instruments and musical parts I play, in and around other instruments, integrating/gluing all of the instrumental music and sonic textures together [Belief]
5e. Composition & Performance: I value composing and performing music that is nurturing of both my self and others [Value]. I aspire to compose and perform music that is nurturing of both my self and others[Goal]. I believe I compose and perform music that is nurturing of both my self and others [Belief].I believe I practice music in a manner that is nurturing of both my self and others [Belief].

onion-layers

Year 2 Research Study Part 2a – who I am discovering/accepting my self to be as a practitioner

6a. Self & Professional Practice: I value diversity of orientation in my professional practice [Value].I strive to exercise both a goal-orientation (product), and a process-orientation (process) with my professional practice [Goal]. Being contrast orientated, I believe there is a great opportunity in professional practice. I believe my target-orientation allows me to effectively and efficiently realise goals for my professional practice, not wavering from the aim and objective focus for that practice. However within that professional practice, I believe I believe I am in the moment. I immerse my self in the process of that practice with my expression and reflection, for great benefit to both my self and my practice. [Belief].
6b. Self & Professional Practice: In my life I value reflection – conscious, deliberate, systematic, interrogative introspection in order to consider, critically analyse and appraise my self and my practice [Value]. I aspire to being reflective – conscious, deliberate, systematic, interrogative introspection in order to consider, critically analyse and appraise my self and my practice (family, music, education, research and management & governance) as appropriate  [Goal]. I am able to be reflective – conscious, deliberate, systematic, interrogative introspection in order to consider, critically analyse and appraise my self and my practice (family, music, education, research and management & governance) as appropriate [Belief].
6c. Self & Professional Practice: In my life I value ongoing development – constant and never-ending reflexive practice, in order to maintain proactive development of my self and my practice [Value]. I aspire to ongoing development – constant and never-ending reflexive practice, in order to maintain proactive development of my self and my practice (family, music, education, research and management & governance) as appropriate [Goal]. I believe I am committed to ongoing development – constant and never-ending reflexive practice, in order to maintain proactive development of my self and my practice (family, music, education, research and management & governance) as appropriate [Belief].
6d. Self & Professional Practice: I value varied motives of practice [Value]. I strive to practice resulting from many varied motivations [Goal]. I believe I practice as a result of:
  • Discovery (to use music practice as a medium for exploring, attempting to do something which you haven’t done previously);
  • Technically (to technically develop one’s skills);
  • Social (to connect to others);
  • Affectively (to express or connect to emotion);
  • Aesthetically (for expression or engagement in something artistic or of beauty);
  • Creatively (for action, just to do);
  • Physical (for physical expression, for exercise];
  • Commercial (for income generation purposes);
  • Educational (to demonstrate specific practice to my students, live or in preparation);
  • Cathartic (for self-development or intervention purposes. For me to connect with my emotions – to notice, to reflect, to acknowledge the emotion, and their significance, to work through that emotional experience – to deal with specific and/or significant events, and hopefully in doing so, move beyond certain emotions associated with these significant events, developing my self);
  • Performance (to maximise my performance standard, and what others get to see of me/ practice);
  • Nurturing (core to my Charter of Values is nurturing – nurturing of self and others. I demonstrate in my education & learning practice; nurturing of both others (eg when I am ‘performing’ either a} and myself in my creative practice; and nurturing of myself in my research practice) [Belief].
6e. Self & Professional Practice: In my life I value nurturing [Value]. I aspire to be nurturing being – of my self and others – across my areas of my practice (family, music, education, research, practice) as appropriate [Goal]. I believe I am a nurturing being – of my self and others – across my areas of my practice (family, music, education, research, practice) – a social carer, an encourager, a coach, a mentor, an educator, a friend…. as appropriate [Belief].

~DLP Pro Image 1.20141020

(DLP 2016)
As I developed my Research Study through Project 1 in the second year of my doctoral studies, I developed my Charter of Values and Beliefs progressively, and updated the following as of 31st December 2016.

onion-layers

Year 2 Research Study Part 2b – who I am discovering/accepting my self to be as a music practitioner

7a. Self & Music Practice: As a contemporary music practitioner, I value the practice of music across all of the six (6) stages of music practice: performance, creation, pre-production, production, post-production, and distribution [Value]. As a contemporary music practitioner, I strive to practice music across all of the six (6) stages of music practice: performance, creation, pre-production, production, post-production, and distribution[Goal]. As a contemporary music practitioner, I believe I practice music across all of the six (6) stages of music practice: performance, creation, pre-production, production, post-production, and distribution [Belief].
7b. Self & Music Practice: I value music primarily for its affective, expressive and communicative qualities [Value]. I strive to perform and compose music primarily for its affective, expressive and communicative qualities [Goal]. I believe I perform and compose music primarily for its affective, expressive and communicative qualities [Belief]
7c. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of music motivated by a diversity of intentions – the majority of which are non-commercial [Value]. I strive to practice music motivated by a diversity of intentions in my life – the majority of which are non-commercial [Goal]. I believe I practice music motivated by a diversity of intentions – the majority of which are non-commercial such as:
  • Discovery (to use music practice as a medium for exploring, attempting to do something which you haven’t done previously)
  • Technically (to use music practice as a medium to practice one’s craft, and technically develop one’s craft skills)
  • Social (to use music practice as a medium for social interaction purposes, to connect to others [communicative])
  • Affectively (to use music practice as a medium to express or connect to emotion)
  • Aesthetically (to use music practice as a medium for expression or engagement in something artistic or of beauty)
  • Creatively (to use music practice as a medium for action, just to do [expressivity])
  • Physical (to use music practice as a medium for physical expression, for exercise]
  • Commercial (to use music practice as a medium for income generation purposes)
  • Educational (to demonstrate specific music practice to my students, live or in preparation)
  • Cathartic (self-development or intervention purposes. For me to connect with my emotions – to notice, to reflect, to acknowledge the emotion, and their significance, to work through that emotional experience – to deal with specific and/or significant events, and hopefully in doing so, move beyond certain emotions associated with these significant events, developing my self)
  • Performance (where my primary motive is to perform, and therefore all creation and creative development is built upon wanting to maximise my performance standard, and what others get to see of me/my art/my music practice
  • Nurturing (core to my Charter of Values is nurturing – nurturing of self and others. I demonstrate in my education & learning practice; nurturing of both others (eg when I am ‘performing’ either a} and myself in my creative practice; and nurturing of myself in my research practice) [Belief]
7d. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of listening to music on any of the three levels: holistic, associative, or critical and analytical listening [Value]. I strive to practice listening to music on any of the three levels: holistic, associative, and critical and analytical listening [Goal]. I believe I practice listening to music on all of the three levels: holistic, associative, and critical and analytical listening [Belief].
7e. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of music of a range of cultural origins [Value]. I strive to practice music across of a range of cultural origins [Goal]. I believe I practice music across a range of cultural origins [Belief]

onion-layers

Year 2 Research Study Part 2c – who I am discovering/accepting myself to be as a music practitioner

8a. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of music across a range of diverse technologies [Value]. I strive to practice music across a range of diverse technologies [Goal]. I believe I practice music across a range of diverse technologies [Belief].
8b. Self & Music Practice: Intuitively, I value physical instruments that emit vibrations and resonances, of a style and size I can physically embrace [Value]. I intuitively research across a range of physical instruments to play that emit vibrations and resonances, of a style and size I can physically embrace [Goal]. I believe I intuitively search for and play a range of physical instruments that emit vibrations and resonances, of a style and size I can physically embrace [Belief].
8c. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of music in a range of diverse sites, where one site’s practice can influence and/or inform another form of practice in another site [Value]. I strive to practice music in a range of diverse sites, where one site’s practice can influence and/or inform another form of practice in another site [Goal]. I believe I practice music in a range of diverse sites, where one site’s practice such as live performance influences and informs another form of practice in another site such as studio performance; which in turn can influence and inform another form of practice such as live performance [Belief].
8d. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of music across a range of diverse holistic work practice, including compositional songs and soundtracks [Value]. I strive to practice music across a range of diverse holistic work practice, including compositional songs and soundtracks [Goal]. I believe I practice music across a range of diverse holistic work practice, including compositional songs and soundtracks [Belief].
8e. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of music across a range of diverse (micro) workflows [Value]. I strive to practice music across a range of diverse (micro) workflows [Goal]. I believe I practice music across a range of diverse (micro) workflows [Belief].

onion-layers

Year 2 Research Study Part 2d – who I am discovering/accepting my self to be as a music practitioner

9a. Composition & Performance Technology: I value a diversity of technology in the creation and layering of musical and sonic textures within the music practice of composition and performance – analogue, digital or digital virtual devices [Value]. I strive to create a diversity of technology in the creation and layering of musical and sonic textures within the music practice of composition and performance – analogue, digital or digital virtual devices [Goal]. I believe I use a diversity of technology to create and layer the musical and sonic textures within my music practice of composition and performance – analogue, digital or digital virtual devices.  I have developed a diverse range of technology to create and layer musical and sonic textures within my music practice of composition and performance – analogue, digital or digital virtual devices [Belief].
9b. Composition & Performance Technology: I value both acoustic style instruments and their timbre, and the manipulation of at-the-time generated or pre-recorded sound sources for creative purposes  [Value]. I strive as a music practitioner to integrate the initial primary focus of acoustic style instruments and their timbre, with the manipulation of at-the-time generated or pre-recorded sound sources for creative purposes [Goal].I believe as a music practitioner I attempt to integrate the initial primary focus of acoustic style instruments and their timbre, with the manipulation of at-the-time generated or pre-recorded sound sources for creative purposes [Belief]. I believe I developed my live/studio technology (my rig) to facilitate the manipulation and layering of sonic textures, and duplicate these irrespective of location – in both live and studio settings [Belief].
9c. Composition & Performance Technology: I value the manipulation and layering of sonic textures must be duplicable equally in live and studio settings. Therefore my rig must facilitate sourcing these sonic textures irrespective of site [Value]. I strive to manipulate and layer sonic textures and duplicate equally in live and studio settings. I strive to develop my live/studio technology (my rig) to facilitate sourcing these sonic textures irrespective of site [Goal]. I believe I manipulate and layer sonic textures and duplicate equally in live and studio settings. I believe I have developed my live/studio technology (my rig) to facilitate sourcing these sonic textures irrespective of site [Belief].

onion-layers

Year 2 Research Study Part 2e – who I am discovering/accepting my self to be as a music practitioner

10a. Creative Practitioner: I value diversity of orientation as a creative practitioner [Value]. I strive to exercise both a goal-orientation (product), and a process-orientation (process) as a creative practitioner [Goal]. Being contrast orientated, I believe there is a great opportunity as a creative practitioner. I believe my target-orientation allows me to effectively and efficiently realise goals, not wavering from the aim and objective focus of that practice. However, I believe I am in the moment as a creative practitioner, fully immersed in the process of my creative practice [Belief].
10b. Creative Practitioner: I value music practice with origins in, and for artistic expression, over music practice solely reliant on craft expression [Value]. I strive to practice music for artistic expression, over music practice solely for craft expression [Goal]. I believe I am now practicing music for artistic expression, rather that practicing music solely for craft expression [Belief].
10c. Creative Practitioner:  I value a described music praxis – a framework that articulates the interdependent elements for consideration during the stages of one’s music practice [Value]. I strive to describe my music praxis – a framework that articulates the interdependent elements for consideration during the stages of one’s music practice [Goal]. I believe I have developed a considered music praxis – a framework that articulates the elements for consideration during the stages one’s music practice. These primary elements of my Music Practice Praxis v8i (see figure I below) are: listening, self, reflection/reflective practice, reflexive practice, motive, theme, song mood, decision to commence, music production approach, compositional approach, agreed reference track, music style, simple versus complex textures, technology, site, holistic work practice, micro workflow, aesthetic choices, time opportunity, and social network engagement [Belief].

DLP DCI Praxis v8i.20161231.P1

Figure I – Project 1 Research Study Developed Praxis v8i (Page 2016c)
10d. Creative Practitioner: I value independent self-reliant solo performers who aspired to create multi-timbral and multi-layered soundscapes in each and every performance, irrespective of motive, musical style or site [Value]. I strive to be an independent self-reliant solo performer who aspires to create multi-timbral and multi-layered soundscapes in each and every performance, irrespective of motive, musical style or site [Goal]. I believe I am an independent self-reliant solo performer who aspires to create multi-timbral and multi-layered soundscapes in each and every performance, irrespective of motive, musical style or site [Belief].

onion-layers

Significant Differences between my Project 1 end Year 1 Charter of Values and Beliefs v1, and my end Year 2 Charter of Values and Beliefs v2

In addition to the two areas I have already noted – 1b and 1c – I will now note some of the significant developments between my Project 1 end Year 1 Charter of Values and Beliefs v1, and my end Year 2 Charter of Values and Beliefs v2.
I added diversity of orientation. Whilst this quality could possibly be inferred from a number of items within my Year 1 Charter of Values and Beliefs, I believe I needed to make it more explicit given it was something that I observed had significant impact on my self and my practice. In pursuing my practice across Year 2, I noted on many occasions that I  was both end product/goal-orientated, and process-orientated. These were quite often at odds with each other, and sometimes I considered them to be mutually exclusive. However, as Year 2 progressed, I realised that there were examples of my approach to practice where these two orientations sat very comfortably side by side in my orientation to practice.  I believe this dual orientation affords me a great opportunity in life. My target-orientatation allows me to be effective and efficient in realising personal goals, not wavering from my focus. However within my practice, in the act of doing and being present within practice, I believe I am process-orientated in my expression and reflection. I believe I immerse my self in the process, and this orientation provides great benefit to both my self, and my practice. Given this positive impact on my self, my practitioner self, and my practice, I therefore added paragraphs 1d, 2c, 4a, 6a and 10a.
I also added nurturing as a human quality. Whilst this was present in my original Charter of Values and Beliefs as paragraph 6d, I observed this quality was missing in other aspects of my life and practice. I therefore added it into paragraphs 1j, 2i, 3d, 4e and 5e.
The five other additions to my Charter of Values and Beliefs v2 that were more practice-based focussed were:
2b. Self & Practice: a high standard of practice;  2c. Self & Practice: a high volume of post-training practice (10,000 hours); 2e. Self & Practice: a complex multi-dimensional approach to practice; and, 4d. Music Practice: the practice of music to assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community music education”); 7c. Self & Creative practice: creating music and sonic narratives in the styles of narrative, prose or song lyrics.

Summary

As a person new to formal academic research studies,  I have been surprised with the number of occasions that I have been confronted by a range of thoughts, feelings, observations, recollections – positives and learnings – and highlighted behavioural patterns over the course of my life, relative to my music practice. Over the past few months I realised that I did not have in fact, the clearest understanding of who I was as a creative practitioner at this moment in time.  Therefore in order to try to anchor myself, I continue to develop my Charter of Values and Beliefs to maintain a valid contemporary values statement – a charter of values for both myself and my music practice at this time. In doing this, I am able to continue to gain new levels of understanding of my self and my practice, and start to apply them reflexively to my self and practice (see figure II below).

creative-practitioner-graphic_end-project-1-20161231-p1

Figure II – Project 1 Research Study Developed Approach (Page 2016d)
Engaging in this research study has allowed me to continue to develop my self, increase my self confidence, develop clarity regarding my practice, and increase my confidence with this task at hand as a practitioner with my Research Study Project 1. In short, it has allowed me to become a more holistic and balanced practitioner – an expanded practitioner (see figure III below).

creative-practitioner-graphic_more-holistic-balanced-practitioner-20161231-p2

Figure III – Project 1 Research Study Developed Approach (Page 2016e)

Next Step

I realise that as my Research Study Project continues and I gain more insight and greater clarity about my self and my practice, this document will require even more development. It remains a dynamic document that will continue to evolve, in line with my reflections and insights of my self interests, and my practitioner self interests.
This blog series is planned to continue next month with Research Practitioner Part 15. It is intended for this blog series to continue on a regular basis as I progress through my doctoral research project.
References
DLP 2016 image courtesy of David L Page. Accessed 27th November, 2016
 Onion image courtesy of: Onion Layers Accessed 28th March, 2015
Page, David 2016a QUT KKP622 Mid-Project 1 Research Study Progress Report submission draft Accessed April 24, 2016.
Page, David 2016b Research Practitioner Part 6  Accessed 27th November, 2016
Page, David 2016c  Project 1 Research Study Developed Praxis v8i  Created 27th November, 2016
Page, David 2016d  Project 1 Research Study Developed Approach Created 27th November, 2016
Page, David 2016e  Project 1 Research Study Developed Approach Created 27th November, 2016
Page, David 2015 QUT KKP603 Project Development in the Creative Industries submission DLP DCI Project Brief  Accessed 22nd April, 2016.
Research 2016 image courtesy of: Research Accessed 28th January 2016
Self Reflection 2016 image courtesy of: Self-reflection-for-personal-growth  Accessed 18th March, 2016.
– ©David L Page 27/11/2016
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

Memory – Age 4

DLP_Age 4_Cropped_Fade.P2

A Few Months Past Four….

A Few Months Past Four….©David L Page 2016
Verse 1: I recall going to kindy
A neighbour drove me with their children,
My local street kids – one the same age as me..
And his little sis
They dropped us off for the day….
It was in a local church,
on a very busy highway corner…
Not such a great place to be, I recall…..
I was only a few months past four…

Peter Rabbit.P1.png

(Daily Telegraph 2015)
Verse 2: The church steeple was a tall as the tallest tree I had ever seen..
It had a cross waiving in the wind above
dark and grey, serious and large
Taller than anything I had ever seen
Refrain: Not such a great place for a child I recall,
I was only a few months past four…
Chorus 1: I played games, but not without hesitation
Who were these other kids (who were there)?
Everyone running around and screaming…
Refrain: Not such a great place for a child I recall,
I was only a few months past four…
Verse 3: I remember around this time,
I messed my pants a lot, I recall,
Almost as though I didn’t know what to do
Feeling outside of my body, and
wondering what everything was about..
what is this skin thing that is wrapped around me?
What does it do, how do I know what to do?
Chorus 1: I played games, but not without hesitation
Who were these other kids (who were there)?
Everyone running around and screaming…
Refrain: Not such a great place for a child I recall,
I was only a few months past four…
Middle 16: And then, at about half-past one
forty (40) of us went into a large grand hall,
lights were low
as we lay down on some portable camp beds
with a blanket and a little pillow
they intended us to fall asleep
But I recall only being able to stay awake…
gazing up at the height of the cathedral ceiling ….
Or at the gigantic stain-glass windows
I can hear some kids coughing,
some sobbing,
some sleeping I recall,
there is just something about this time…
I would listen to the (near) silence
and allow me time, to be me…..
Chorus 1: I played games, but not without hesitation
Who were these other kids (who were there)?
Everyone running around and screaming…
Refrain: Not such a great place for a child I recall,
I was only a few months past four…
Return to Middle 16: they intended us to fall asleep
But I recall only being able to stay awake…
gazing up at the height of the cathedral ceiling ….
Or at the gigantic stain-glass windows
I can hear some kids coughing,
some sobbing,
some sleeping I recall,
there is just something about this time…
I would listen to the (near) silence
and allow me time, to be me…..
I was only a few months past four…
Chorus 1: I played games, but not without hesitation
Who were these other kids (who were there)?
Everyone running around and screaming…
Refrain: Not such a great place for a child I recall,
I was only a few months past four…
Return to Middle 16: I looked forward to this time every day…
gazing up at the height of the cathedral ceiling ….
Or at the gigantic stain-glass windows
I can hear some kids coughing,
some sobbing,
some sleeping I recall,
there is just something about this time…
that allows me time, for me…..
I was only a few months past four…
A Few Months Past Four….©David L Page 2016This audio event represents a developed sense of my recollection of this significant event. 
Peter Rabbit.P2
(War Memorial Register 2016)
The next blog in this Project 1 series is Memory – Age 5.
References
Daily Telegraphy. 2015. History of Pearces Corner on Pennant Hills Rd by Tom Richmond, Hornsby Advocate, September 4, 2015. Accessed 26th December, 2016
DLP image courtesy of: Slideshare  Accessed 27th December, 2016
Page, David L. 2016. “A Few Months Past Four….” ©David L Page 2016
DLP Soundcloud. 2016.  DLP Soundcloud  Accessed 27th December, 2016
War Memorial Register. 2016. Home of Peter Rabbit Kindergarten  Accessed 26th December, 2016
A Few Months Past Four …. audio link courtesy of: David L Page  Accessed 27th December, 2016
– ©David L Page 27/06/2016
– updated ©David L Page 28/12/2016
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

Doctoral Research Study – Part 2k

My journey continues….

~DLP Pro Image Fun 5b small.20141020

(Page 2014)
This blog is a continuation of a series. See here (Page 2015a) for the previous blog.

Year 2015: 2nd Observation Part k

As part of the professional doctorate program I had entered, we were inducted into the world of academic research study. Whilst I was a relative open book in terms of my quest for new knowledge, I found the requirements of being fast-tracked from a position of practitioner into the world of academia at a doctoral level, overwhelming. The level of growth required was enormous.
As part of our program, we were being led to examine three (3) aspects of our practice:
  • the field and discipline of practice
  • the site of our practice
  • and me as a practitioner

Bordering my music-making practice

Over the preceding ten (10) blogs – Parts 2a through 2i –  I have developed my knowledge in the fields and disciplines of contemporary music-making, and as a result been able to border – and define – my music-making practice.

I have looked in depth at:
a.     Historical development of the industry from the 1830’s to the current era. Recording industry – from the invention of the 1st recording, microphones, corporate studios, progressing to large format recording studios
  • Music Production
  • Digital Technology – Consoles
  • Digital Technology – Organs, Synthesisers, Samplers
  • Project Studio
  • Consoles – DAWs and, Digital Virtual Instruments – Organs, Synthesisers, Sampler
  • Portable Studio
b. Industry standards of practice – commercial
  • Industry standards of practice – technical
  • Industry standards of practice – creative, aesthetic or affective
  • Industry standards of practice – soft skills
c. Defining DIY
d. Social, Cultural and Music-making practice Related
e. Changing Face of Music Production
f. The traditional definition of Music Producer
g. A new discipline of music-making emerges
h. The contemporary music-making practice
i. The contemporary music-making practitioner
Following this historical investigation, I examined me as a practitioner, outlining:
a. My autobiography as a music-maker
b. What form my practice currently takes
c. Broadening definition of music-making practice
d. Changing motives of practice
I then outlined my specific site/s:
e. My sites: my DIY Studio Production setup/s.
I concluded the bordering – defining – my music-making practice with:
f. Defining the Music Production process
g. Defining a holistic DIY Music Production process
In the following three (3) blogs, I outlined the Aim of Research Study, listed the existing theory and research studies had already been completed within the industry, field and disciplines; and finished outlining the significance of this research study for the industry, field and discipline.

A holistic view of a higher degree research study

By the end of 2015, my research study journey was well under way. As outlined in the preceding sections, I had begun my investigations across six (6) areas (see figure I below). I had gained clarity regarding the Industry and field of my practice, and standards of practice; my autobiography and events in my life that may have influenced who I am today. I had started to examine my practice, and identify the elements of praxis. I investigated the field and discipline theory, identified the lens that I viewed the world; and developed an appropriate research methodological approach. 
 Figure I – Preparing for Research Study (Page 2015b)
In doing so, I developed my research study brief. I gained clarity as to how the research study was situated, and the scope of the project. Additionally, I was clear on the potential benefits – the significance of this research study could have – in terms of the wider industry, various fields and disciplines. I did not assume for one moment that I was an expert in any of the areas. This twelve (12) month entree had provided me enough information to understand I was a novice academic research practitioner. Such research had provided me an opportunity to start to frame my music-making practice, in ways I had not previously considered.
My eyes were starting to open re who I, David L Page was in terms of my contemporary music-making practitioner identity. I had looked at a number of events in my life that had in some way influence over my approach to music-making. I had always known I had vast musical influences, but it was only in putting them together into a mind-map, that I comprehended the vastness of these, and could begin to make additional linkages between what may have seemed to be contrasting music styles. In doing this, I could better understand the diversity of my music-making practice, and why I was perhaps so enticed to so many corners of music-making practice. In re-exploring such diversity as outlined in the previous blogs, I recognised the need for me to develop how I defined my music-making. I accept now that my definition of music-making necessarily needs to include a broader term that is inclusive of everyday music-making engagement – that of musicking.
At the end of 2015, despite my twelve (12) months of intensive investigation and discovery of new knowledge, I accepted that I was in many ways, only just beginning my formal academic journey. 
onion-layers
This blog series is planned to continue next month with Doctoral Research Study – Part 3 (Page 2015c). It is intended for this blog series to continue on a regular basis as I progress through my doctoral research project.
References
Onion image courtesy of: Onion Layers Accessed 15th December, 2014
Page, David L. 2017 2nd Observation image courtesy of David L Page Created 10th June, 2017
Page, David L. 2015c. Doctoral Research Study – Part 3 Accessed 29th April, 2015
Page, David L. 2015b. Preparing for Research Study image courtesy of David L Page Created 19th November, 2015
Page, David L. 2015a. Doctoral Research Study – Part 2j Accessed 15th April, 2015
Page, David L. 2014 image courtesy of David L Page Created 15th December, 2014
– @David L Page 20/11/2015
– updated @David L Page 01/12/2015
– updated @David L Page 10/06/2017
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

SaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSave

Doctoral Research Study – Part 2j

Design of Research Study

qut-logo

This blog is a continuation of a series. See here (Page 2015a) for the previous blog.

Significance of this research study for the industry, field and discipline

The significance of this research can be categorised into three areas: a blended philosophical approach additional to the current academic literature; the expansion of research methodologies usually applied in this area; and the development of a new music-making praxis, inclusive of the practitioner self.
The combination of my ontological perspective, epistemological approach and multi-methods research study, will add a unique perspective to the literature on music and sound, cultural sociology, phenomenology, arts’ literacy, self and narrative. This empirical research study will be conducted through my experiential phenomenological lens (Grace and Ajjawi 2010, 198), using qualitative methodologies of: practice-led research, reflective practice, critical thinking, reflexive practice, ethnography and evocative auto-ethnography over the two projects. No current studies seek to blend these three into the one paradigm.
As mentioned, Bennett (2000) and Frith (1996) discuss music and sound, cultural sociology, and narrative for example, but from a different ontological perspective, disregarding arts’ literacy and self. Others sharing my ontological perspective such as Griffiths (2010) and Ryan (2014) tend to discuss areas of my intended phenomenology – arts’ literacy, self and narrative – but disregard music and sound, as well as the specificities of cultural sociology. Others such as Bartleet (2009) and Davidson (2015) both cover practice-based research regarding their music-making, but offer more of an insight into the auto-ethnographic research aspect of the study, rather than a specific focus on their music-making (Dogantan-Dack 2015).
There is no literature that I have found which takes a comprehensive look at music-making practice across multiple stages of practice, from an experiential phenomenological lens, as a practice-led auto-ethnographic research study. It is this differentiation that will provide my intended research study significance in its perspective.
This multi-tiered examination will represent a significant departure from current discussion of music-making practice, developing praxis of contemporary music-making practice. As outlined in the previous section, functional music production texts generally propose very narrow views of practice. My research will serve other industry practitioners by investigating the relationships of these elements of practice. I will also expand this discussion by considering music making practitioners’ motives, offering a further unique insight to the most frequently discussed motive – technical practice. Other motive orientations such as aesthetics or creativity – with the exception of Moylan (2007) – are seldom discussed. Most significantly, I will be including an examination of the self in context, to provide a greater understanding of, and develop a broader view of music praxis. . This study will innovate through refocusing success in terms of bringing the social self into the industry literature and bringing the industry into the identity literature. I had considered the completion of interviews at the beginning of Doctoral Research Study Project 2 to provide a source of empirical data about contemporary music practitioners, in terms of their view of self, their motivations and the relationship of their choices of technology, music style, workflow and creative location. The data collected throughout the two projects will illuminate a more holistic and inclusive approach to practitioner-based research, and stimulate discussion amongst fellow researchers, field and discipline practitioners and creative industry educators.
As an examination of music-making practice and self, the research methodologies not only focus on evocative auto-ethnography but also draw on critical reflection and reflexive practice principles.   As Rescher notes:
“not only is knowledge indispensably useful for our practice but the reverse is the case as well. Knowledge development is itself a practice and various practical processes and perspectives are correspondingly useful—or even necessary—to the way in which we go about constituting and validating our knowledge” (2003, xvii).
It is one of my objectives to showcase the opportunities and challenges of such a qualitative study, particularly within a creative arts’ discipline. In this way my research study will contribute to transforming existing epistemologies of practice. I would expect to contribute in terms of the extensive empirical data that will be gathered throughout my research study, in terms of music-making practice as an expression of the self, allowing a greater understanding of the self, as the creative practitioner. I would also expect to contribute an increased understanding of contemporary music-making practice in the creation of EP’s. This will include a guide for aspiring practitioners in best practice.
Lastly, I would expect my research study to contribute in terms of higher order behaviours in a taxonomy of reflective practice. As a multi-method practice-led approach, I will draw on and apply multiple approaches of reflective practice across the four-year part-time research study, in both Project 1 and 2. There will be extensive empirical data gathered as a matter of process, with commentary and reflection regarding the opportunities and challenges of such approaches including that of: Archer (2007, 2010), Ryan (2014), Griffith (2010), Brookfield (1995), and Finlay (2008), within contemporary music-making practice. Of particular note will be data elicited regarding a creative practitioner performing the dual role of both practitioner and researcher, and the implications this has on the music-making practice workflow.
The findings in this research study will also provide utility across disciplines. In a world with a developing DIY intent, of developing practice across all disciplines, I trust my research study will broaden discussion in the field of social and cultural studies by providing both data and narrative for dual primary role-based (subject and researcher) formal research studies.
onion-layers
This blog series is planned to continue next month with Doctoral Research Study – Part 2k (Page 2015b). It is intended for this blog series to continue on a regular basis as I progress through my doctoral research project.
References
Archer, Margaret S. 2010. Conversations about reflexivity, Ontological Explorations. New York: Routledge.
Archer, Margaret S. 2007. Making our way through the world: human reflexivity and social mobility. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Bartleet, Brydie-Leigh. 2009. “Behind the baton: Exploring autoethnographic writing in a musical context.” Journal of Contemporary Ethnography 38 (6): 713-733.
Bennett, Andy. 2000. Popular music and youth culture: music, identity and place. New York: Palgrave.
Brookfield, Stephen D. 1995. Becoming a critically reflective teacher. San Francisco: Jossey Bass.
Davidson, Jane W. 2015. “Practice-based music research: lessons from a researcher’s personal history.” In Artistic Practice as research in music: theory, criticism, practice, edited by Mine Dogantan-Dack, 93-106. Surrey: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
Dogantan-Dack, Mine (Ed). 2015. Artistic Practice as research in music: theory, criticism, practice, edited by Graham Welch, Adam Ockelford and Ian Cross, SEMPRE Studies in The Psychology of Music. Surrey: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
Finlay, Linda. 2008. Reflecting on reflective practice. Practice-based Professional Learning Centre paper 52 29 (August 12th, 2015). www.open.ac.uk/pbpl.
Frith, Simon. 1996. “Music and identity.” Questions of cultural identity: 108-27.
Grace, S and R Ajjawi. 2010. Phenomenological research: Understanding human phenomena. Researcing practice: A discussion on qualitative methodologies. Rotterdam: Sense.
Griffiths, Morweena. 2010. Research and the self. In The Routledge companion to research in the arts, edited by M Biggs and H Karlsson, 167-185. London: Routledge.
Moylan, William. 2007. The art of recording: the creative resources of music production and audio. 2nd ed. Boston: Focal Press.
Onion image courtesy of: Onion Layers Accessed 15th December, 2014
Page, David L. 2015b. Doctoral Research Study – Part 2k.  Accessed 20th November, 2015
Page, David L. 2015a. Doctoral Research Study – Part 2i  Accessed 20th October, 2015
Page, David L. 2014 image courtesy of David L Page  Created 15th December, 2014
QUT image courtesy of:  Queensland University of Technology   Accessed 4th September 2015
Rescher, Nicholas. 2003. Epistemology: an introduction to the theory of knowledge, edited by George R Lucas Jr, SUNY series in Philosophy. New York: SUNY Press.
Ryan, Mary Elizabeth. 2014. Reflective practice in the arts. In Literacy in the Arts, edited by G Barton, 77-90. London: Springer.
– ©David L Page 10/11/2015
– updated ©David L Page 20/11/2015
– updated ©David L Page 10/06/2016
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Doctoral Research Study – Part 2i

Design of Research Study

qut-logo

This blog is a continuation of a series. See here (Page 2015a) for the previous blog.

Existing theory and research studies had already been completed within the industry, field and disciplines

As part of my preparing for my research study, I investigated a broad range of literature – industry-based text-books, and academic-based peer-reviewed literature. A variety of these resources have been informative to my intended research study. These include:
Industry-based text-books focusing specifically and comprehensively on one aspect of the music-making process in detail. These resources predominantly look at the technical elements of music-making practice, such as composing within a DAW. Examples are:
  • Gilraith’s (2010) “The Guide To MIDI Orchestration“;
  • Edstrom’s (2006) “Musicianship in the digital age” ; and
  • Dodge and Jerses’ (1997) “Computer music: synthesis, composition and performance”.
There were also a range of peer-reviewed articles outlining their research studies. Whilst I found these studies useful in terms of highlighting considerations of the compositional process within a digital virtual environment (DAW), none took a holistic perspective of the music-making process. Little attempt was made in any of these to develop music-making praxis; nor to consider the self or practitioner self as worthy elements of practice.
  • Nevels’ 2012 study, as summarised in “Using Music software in the Compositional process: a case study of electronic music composition”;
  • Chen’s 2012 Hong Kong-based “A Pilot Study Mapping Students’ Composing Strategies – Implications for Teaching Computer-Assisted Composition”;
  • Folkestad et al’s 1998 study, as summarized in “Compositional strategies in computer-based music-making”; and
  • Marrington’s 2011 study as summarised in “Experiencing Musical Composition In The DAW: The Software Interface As Mediator Of The Musical Idea”.
A number of other peer-reviewed articles looked at the studio more from a holistic perspective, but had a number of limitations of perspective; namely the lack of attempt to develop music-making praxis; nor to consider the self or practitioner self as worthy elements of practice. For example:
  • Bell’s 2014 study, as summarized in “Trial-by-fire: A case study of the musician–engineer hybrid role in the home studio”;
  • a number of studies contained within Frith and Zagorski-Thomas’s 2012 “The Art of Record Production: An Introductory Reader for a New Academic Field”;
I read with interest the title of Thompson and Lashua’s “Getting it on Record: Issues and Strategies for Ethnographic Practice in Recording Studios”, only to realise in the abstract that they focussed on a very narrow view of production. Their upfront claim of “(g)iven that recording studios are, first and foremost, concerned with documenting musician’s performances” signalled to me that their view of production was only to focus on forms of musical style where this was the case. By definition, they would exclude the majority of musical styles where the recording studio was used as an instrument, with the producer acting as composer [1]. However, from a methodology point of view, Thompson and Lashua’s article – along with some of the others mentioned, do outline some useful considerations for my research study.
I continued my investigation broadening my scope. Peer-reviewed books and articles such as Bennett (2000) and Frith (1996) discuss music and sound, cultural sociology, and narrative. These were useful – interesting and informative – in terms of my research and developing understanding of specific sociological concepts. However, they have limited use in terms of my particular research study given their differing ontological perspective relative to my experiential phenomenological lens. Those studies exclude any engagement or discussion of the elements of motive and self.
Other peer-reviewed research studies such as De Carvalho’s (2012) perspective in her article “The Discourse of Home Recording” do consider the self and identity. However, they are similarly limited due to De Carvalho’s ontological lens of a radical structuralist. Viewing the home music-making in terms of power relationships (Burrell and Morgan 1992), whilst an interesting point of view in understanding the dynamics of the broader industry – and perhaps even how I as a practitioners has arrived at this point of access – , has similarly limited relevance for me trying to understand the process of my practice, and develop music-making praxis.
Webber’s (2009) study “In music and in life: confronting the self through auto-ethnography” is perhaps the closest to my proposed study. Webber is a music-making practitioner, who also drew on an auto-ethnographic methodology, and focused on self. However, that study differs – subtlety – to my proposed study, in two ways:
  • Webber was diagnosed with the condition Asperger syndrone just prior to commencing his study, and therefore was motivated to use his study to understand himself, and how specifically that condition informed his music-making practice. I have no such known condition, and am motivated by a need to examine process in order to engage with my music-making practice more effectively;
  • Webber’s music-making practice is composition for theatre, and therefore quite a specialist skill relative to my broader definition and application of music-making as previously outlined.
Irrespective of these differences, there is much I believe I can learn from his study, and as a result, I gained Dr Webber’s agreement to be an Industry Mentor on my research study.
onion-layers
Footnote
[1] In later blogs I will discuss approaches to production, with includes (of many) two quite distinct approaches. As outlined in Moorefield’s 2005 “The Producer as Composer: Shaping the Sounds of Popular Music”. Organic style of music such as classical, jazz and roots styles of music attempt to capture the performance as accurately as possible – as Thompson and Lashua infer – in order to maintain the integrity of the art and craft. However, others styles of music such as pop (and its many commercially motivated sub-genre derivatives), hip-hop, rap and electronic dance music styles of music are – in this era – more likely to be produced with the intention that the producer will embellish the artist’s performance, often beyond recognition of the original tracked artist’s performance. Both approaches are valid, but are prescribed by the style of music one is endeavouring to produce. Given my broad approach to production, Thompson and Lashua’s article is severely limiting, effectively excluding a number of musical styles I am likely to focus on.
onion-layers
This blog series is planned to continue next month with Doctoral Research Study – Part 2j (Page 2015b).  It is intended for this blog series to continue on a regular basis as I progress through my doctoral research project.
References
Bell, Adam Patrick. 2014. “Trial-by-fire: A case study of the musician–engineer hybrid role in the home studio.” Journal of Music, Technology & Education 7 (3): 295-312.
Bennett, Andy. 2000. Popular music and youth culture: music, identity and place. New York: Palgrave.
Burrell, Gibson and Gareth Morgan. 1992. Sociological paradigms and organisational analysis: elements of the sociology of corporate life. Aldershot, Hants: Ashgate.
Chen, Jason Chi Wai. 2012. “A pilot study mapping students’ composing strategies: Implications for teaching computer-assisted composition.” Research Studies in Music Education 34 (2): 157-171.
De Carvalho, Alice Tomaz. 2012. The discourse of home recording: authority of pros and the sovereignty of big studios. Journal of the Art of Record Production 7.
Dodge, Charles and Thomas A Jerse. 1997. Computer music: synthesis, composition and performance. 2nd ed. Melbourne: Macmillan Library Reference.
Edstrom, Brent. 2006. Musicianship in the digital age. Boston: Thompson Course Technology.
Folkestad, Göran, David J Hargreaves and Berner Lindström. 1998. “Compositional strategies in computer-based music-making.” British Journal of Music Education 15 (01): 83-97.
Frith, Simon. 1996. “Music and identity.” Questions of cultural identity: 108-27.
Frith, Simon and Simon Zagorski-Thomas. 2012. The art of record production: an introductory reader for a new academic field: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
Marrington, Mark. 2011. “Experiencing musical composition in the DAW: the software interface as mediator of the musical idea.” Journal on the Art of Record Production 1.
Moorefield, Virgil. 2005. The producer as composer: shaping the sounds of popular music. London: MIT Press.
Nevels, Daniel L. 2013. “Using music software in the compositional process: a case study of electronic music composition.” Journal of Music, Technology and Education 5 (3): 257-271. doi: 10.1386/jmte.5.3.257_1.
Onion image courtesy of: Onion Layers Accessed 15th December, 2014
Page, David L. 2015b. Doctoral Research Study – Part 2j.  Accessed 20th October, 2015
Page, David L. 2015a. Doctoral Research Study – Part 2h  Accessed 5th September, 2015
Page, David L. 2014 image courtesy of David L Page  Created 15th December, 2014
QUT image courtesy of:  Queensland University of Technology   Accessed 4th September 2015
Thompson, Paul and Brett Lashua. 2014. “Getting it on record issues and strategies for ethnographic practice in recording studios.” Journal of Contemporary Ethnography: 0891241614530158.
Webber, Colin. 2009. “In music and in life: confronting the self through auto-ethnography.” In Music ethnographies: making auto-ethnography sing – making music personal, edited by Brydie-Leigh Bartlett and Carolyn Ellis, 261-273. Bowen Hills: Australian Academic Press.
– ©David L Page 20/10/2015
– updated ©David L Page 20/11/2015
– updated ©David L Page 10/06/2016
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Reflective Practitioner – Part 8

This blog is a continuation of a series. See here (Page 2015a) for the previous blog.

Pausing for a moment of reflection…..

Music-making

Music-making is not a choice for me; it is a necessity. I have made music over many decades, in any different forms. I have practiced music for over four decades in multiple social and cultural contexts, and in significantly contrasting creative locations, such as a church choir singer, musician, songwriter, band member, teacher, project manager, engineer, solo artist, musician for hire, producer, and most recently an electronic music producer and educator. Over this time, I have engaged a (vast) range of technologies, using countless variations of workflow. Having commenced my music-making practice with acoustic and analogue technology, I then progressed to digital technologies, and finally to digital virtual technologies. I found moving to digital and digital virtual technologies in recent decades, difficult. The vastly different technologies and associated workflows that lend themselves to creative locations and music styles impacted my music-making practice, hindering the realisation of my creative productions, my EPs.
~DLP Pro Image Fun 5b small.20141020
(2014)

Self

Observing new music production technologies and associated workflows impacted my music-making practice and the realisation of my creative productions. I observed this phenomenon had an effect on the concept of my self, which then in turn had an effect on my motive to practice music. Ryan considers it essential for a creative arts practitioner to look deeper into self: “Self-awareness and identity are significant both in the study of the arts and in becoming an artist, as aesthetic inquiry and performance are constituted by subjective self-expression in relation to objective conditions” (Ryan 2014,77).
Music is acknowledged as being particularly important in terms of the development of the self: Hargreaves et al (2002) discuss how music facilitates self expression and development, allowing the self to transform, and construct new identities. Frith (1996,124) argues that “Music constructs our sense of identity through the direct experiences it offers of the body, time and sociability, experiences which enable us to place ourselves in imaginative cultural narratives.” While Bennett (2000, ii) concludes that “music is produced and consumed by young people in ways that both inform their sense of self and also serve to construct the social world in which their identities operate”. For many decades I have asked questions of my self, though always in isolation of my music practice. Velosa and Carvalho’s (2013) “Music Composition as a way of learning: emotions and the situated self” and Taylor’s (2008) “Pink Noise: Queer Identity and Musical Performance in a local context” both stressed the importance of situating the self within the context of interest, in order to study it. There are a number of studies where this is done, from example Taylor’s (2012) and Peraino’s (2006) studies of gender. However, whilst an increasing number of music practice discussions include the element of self, however, few exist outside of academic-based articles or texts (DeNora 1999; MacDonald et al 2002; DeNora 2005; Peraino 2006; Taylor 2012).
During my Doctoral Research Project 1, I will examine the praxis of music-making practice (see figure I below): how the creation of EP’s are negotiated and articulated through: self, motive, technology, music style, workflow and the creative location. I will critically reflect on how my music practice can be considered a performance of the self, and how this performance is governed by motive, and mediated through technology, creative location, style and processes of workflow. The ways that I achieve such integration represent personal expressions and negotiations of the self through the technology and within my sites of practice, the particular music style, and my workflow of DIY music practice (Emmerson 2007).
dlp-music-praxis-v3-20151203-p1
Figure I – Praxis version 3 (Page 2015b)
In terms of my practitioner self, the following specific questions require consideration:
  • what are my motivations to practice music?
  • how does my music practice contribute to the concept of my self?
  • how does my self-concept shape my music practice?

Dual Roles

Given my dual primary role for my research study of both the subject as music practitioner and the researcher, and the necessity to include the perspective of me as practitioner self, I have selected the mixed-method qualitative methodologies of: practice-led research, evocative auto-ethnography, reflective practice, critical thinking and reflexive practice (see figure II below).

my-research-study-project_3-points_no-self-p0

Figure II – Research Study Approach (Page 2015c)
This blog series is planned to continue next month with Doctoral Research Study – Part 2i (Page 2015d). It is intended for this blog series to continue on a regular basis as I progress through my doctoral research project.
References
Bennett, Andy. 2000. Popular music and youth culture: music, identity and place. New York: Palgrave.
DeNora, Tia. 1999. Music as a technology of the self. Poetics 27 (1): 31-56.
DeNora, Tia. 2005. The pebble in the pond: Musicing, therapy, community. Nordic Journal of Music Therapy 14 (1): 57-66.
Emmerson, Simon. 2007. Living electronic music. Hampshire, UK: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
Frith, Simon. 1992. The industrialization of popular music. Popular Music and Communication 2: 49-74.
Hargreaves, DJ, D Miell and RAR MacDonald. 2002. What are musical identities, and why are they important? In Musical Identities, edited by RAR MacDonald, DJ Hargreaves and D Miell, 1-20. Oxford Oxford University Press.
MacDonald, Raymond A. R., David J. Hargreaves and Dorothy Miell. 2002. Musical identities. Oxford: Oxford University Press..
Page, David L. 2015d. Doctoral Research Study – Part 2i Accessed 20th October, 2015
Page, David L. 2015c. Figure II – Research Study Approach image courtesy of David L Page in QUT KKP603 Project Development in the Creative Industries submission draft Accessed 4th October, 2015.
Page, David L. 2015b. Figure I – Praxis version 3 image courtesy of David L Page in QUT KKP603 Project Development in the Creative Industries submission draft Accessed 4th October, 2015.
Page, David L. 2015a. Reflective Practitioner – Part 7 Accessed 15th September, 2015.
Page, David L. 2014 image courtesy of David L Page Created 15th December, 2014
Ryan, Mary Elizabeth. 2014. Reflective practice in the arts. In Literacy in the Arts, edited by G Barton, 77-90. London: Springer.
Peraino, Judith Ann. 2006. Listening to the sirens: musical technologies of queer identity from Homer to Hedwig. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Taylor, Jodie. 2012. Playing it queer: popular music, identity and queer world-making. Bern: Peter Lang.
Taylor, Jodie. 2008. Pink Noise: Queer identity and musical performance in a local context. Paper presented at the Music on the Edge: selected refereed papers from the 2007 IASPM-ANZ Conference, Dunedin, New Zealand. jaspm.org..au.
Veloso, Ana Luísa and Sara Carvalho. 2013. Music composition as a way of learning: emotions and the situated self.  In Musical Creativity: Insights from Music Education Research: Insights from Music Education Research: 73
– ©David L Page 06/10/2015
-updated ©David L Page 20/10/2015
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Reflective Practitioner – Part 7

This blog is a continuation of a series. See here (Page 2015a) for the previous blog.

Reflecting..

~DL with Gretsch + C414.20141006.P21
(2015b)
To say that music is an integral part of my life I believe understates the importance of it for me. Music has been the one constant in my life, central to my being, accompanying me wherever I am, irrespective of whether I am physically playing, listening or internally listening via memory. Irrespective of the location, circumstance or event, music is within me. Music practice is not a choice for me; it is a necessity. I have practiced music for over four decades in multiple social and cultural contexts, and in significantly contrasting creative locations, such as a church choir singer, musician, songwriter, teacher, band member, producer, commercial songwriter, manager, solo artist, musician for hire, band leader, stage manager, artist coach, engineer (live and studio), and most recently an Electronic Music Producer and educator. I have engaged a (vast) range of technologies, using countless variations of workflow. I continue to practice music on a daily basis, engaging physical instruments, digital virtual technologies, or in the research, analysis, or listening to music styles. I embrace a broad definition of music practice (Small 1998; DeNora 2000; Wallis 2001; DeNora 2005; Hesmondhalgh 2013), with my practice currently including the preparation for and teaching audio at a higher education institute, a variety of contracted music projects from tracking to mixing, and examining my music practice through this doctoral research study.
Given my current motives for practice are not volume sales-based, I am averse to categorising my music practice as professional practice. In looking for an alternative classification to define my music practice, I considered the classifications for my practice of: professional, semi-professional, amateur or hobbyist (Rogers 2013). Could it be semi-professional, as I earn multiple small income streams from various forms of music practice? Or is it amateur, referring to my current status as a music producer where I am earning minimal income at present because of my current pursuits of creative industry education, and full-time doctoral studies? Referencing Kuznetson and Paulos’s article, I am reluctant to assume the title of expert for my music practice, as I consider myself a generalist across a breadth of skills and experiences. (Kuznetson and Paulos 2010, 295). What I do however accept is who I am: highly motivated, possessing an impassioned commitment to my practice, with a very high level of focus on developing my knowledge, skill level and technology. After four decades of music practice, I seek to learn on a daily basis: newly released creative technologies, applying them in a variety of creative locations; familiarising my self with new music styles; developing new practice workflows; better understanding my motives, and my self. I am engaging this doctoral research study to investigate my practice, in order to develop greater understanding and workflows. I therefore am of the opinion I exhibit qualities and attributes that reflect an attitude of professionalism.
Despite my four decades of practice, I have my eyes very much on the future. I still have a lifetime of music goals still to realise: songs to write and arrange; sonic textures to explore; creative productions to develop; and engage with both my peers and the public to a far greater degree than I have to date. I am hopeful of continuing my journey with music as an integral part of my life, core to my being, accompanying me wherever I am. For these reasons, not with standing my experience, knowledge and skills accumulated and developed to date, both within the field and discipline of music and sound, and all other experiences in life, I also classify my self as an aspiring music practitioner.
I commenced my music practice with acoustic and analogue technology, developing a workflow that reinforced my musical literacy, instrumental skills and personal taste in music. However, moving from acoustic to digital and digital virtual technologies in recent decades, I have observed the vastly different technologies and associated workflows that lend themselves to creative locations and music styles. This has impacted my music practice, hindering the realisation of my creative productions: my EPs. Whilst I have found my self at various times asking a number of questions in isolation, I now find myself seeing them as connected issues within the more global problem I propose for my doctoral research investigation: ‘Contemporary DIY music practice and the practitioner self’.
This blog series is planned to continue next month with Reflective Practitioner – Part 8 (Page 2015c). It is intended for this blog series to continue on a regular basis as I progress through my doctoral research project.
References
DeNora, Tia. 2000. Music in everyday life. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
DeNora, Tia. 2005. The pebble in the pond: Musicing, therapy, community. Nordic Journal of Music Therapy 14 (1): 57-66.
Hesmondhalgh, David. 2013. Why music matters. Vol. 1. West Sussex, UK: Wiley Blackwell.
Kuznetsov, Stacey and Eric Paulos. 2010. Rise of the expert amateur: DIY projects, communities, and cultures. In Proceedings of the 6th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Extending Boundaries, Reykjavik, Iceland, October 16-20, 2010, edited, 295-304. http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1868914&picked=prox: ACM.
Page, David L. 2015c. Reflective Practitioner – Part 8. Accessed 6th October, 2015.
Page, David L. 2015b. image courtesy of David L Page Created 15th September, 2015
Page, David L. 2015a. Doctoral Research  Study – Part 2h. Accessed 15th September, 2015.
Page, David L. 2014 image courtesy of David L Page Created 15th December, 2014
Rogers, I. 2013. The hobbyist majority and the mainstream fringe: the pathways of independent music-making in Brisbane, Australia. In Redefining mainstream popular music, edited by Sarah Baker, Andy Bennett and Jodie Taylor, 162-173. New York: Routledge.
Small, Christopher. 1998. Musicking: the meanings of performing and listening. Hanover: University Press of New England.
Wallis, R Dr. 2001. Best practice cases in the music industry and their relevance for government policies in developing countries. Paper presented at the United Conference on Trade and Development, Brussels, Belgium, May 14-20, 2001.
– ©David L Page 15/09/2015
-updated @David L Page 06/10/2015
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

SaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave