Doctoral Pilot Study – Part 11b

Doctorate of Creative Industries Project 1

research

(Research 2016)

Precis

Continuing on from my previous blogs in this series; as I am now at the end of my second year of my post-graduate academic research studies, I felt it is important to revisit and develop my Charter of Values and Beliefs v1 of goals, values and beliefs for both myself and my music practice.
I have taken the liberty to re-post my findings at the end of Year 1 as I have gained considerable more insight relative to the last post I made on the 25th April 2016.
The Art of self-reflection
(Self Reflection 2016)
Over the course of the seven (7) months of life, music practice and reflective practice, I have crystallised my thoughts and understandings, and gained fresh levels of clarity about my self and practice. The most notable development to the Year 1 (2015) Charter of Values and Beliefs v1 was over the last quarter of this year, in my efforts to balance full-time work and full-time research study commitments, and family responsibilities, I became quite stressed. In re-reading my Charter, I reassessed the order and priority of my item 1b. In the original 2015 description I had listed 1b as being:
1b. Self: I strive to be balanced, to be a balanced, functional human being – affective, expressive and communicative – mentally, physically, spiritually [Goal]. Whilst being very busy, I believe I have balance in my life. I believe I am a balanced, functional human being – affective, expressive and communicative – mentally, physically, spiritually [Belief]
However, over the last three months of 2016 I appraised my self as being anything but balanced. I have now reflected and found that this imbalance has come as a result of choosing to overlook the balance of my spiritual, physical and mental being.
In the 2015 listing, I had ordered the three areas of priority as being mentally, physically and spiritually. However, in reflecting on these areas, I realised that their priority was incorrect for me, and my priority was in fact the reverse order of this: spirituality was my highest priority, followed by physical, and then followed by intellectual – mental. In my addressing my imbalance, by focussing on the order of these in terms of spiritual, physical and mental I quickly returned to a greater degree of balance.
As I had essentially looked over the spiritual aspect in my original Charter, I recognised the oversight of this, and therefore I added some additional points in, including 1b for example.
1b. Self: In life, I value a spiritual approach to life – to experience, to learn, and to develop respect and acceptance [Value]. I strive to maintain spiritual balance within my life – to experience, to learn, and to develop respect and acceptance [Goal]. I believe we are spiritual beings, engaging in a human experience. I believe my human journey is to resolve the limitations, contradictions and inconsistencies of being human – to experience, to learn, and to develop respect and acceptance – and to engage congruently within the physical world [Belief]. [see *Note above].
I remain surprised with the number of occasions that I have been confronted by a range of thoughts, feelings, observations, recollections – positives and learnings – and highlighted behavioural patterns over the course of my life, relative to my music practice. Over the past seven (7) months of embarking on my research study, I have increasingly developed a clearer understanding of who I am as a self, and as a creative practitioner. No doubt this view is likely to continue to develop as I progress with my research study, but given I was nearing the completion of Project 1, I felt it was timely to update my Charter of Values and Beliefs.

~DLP Pro Image 1.20141020

(DLP 2016)

DLP’s Charter of Values and Beliefs v2

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Year 1 Research Study Part 1a – who I know I am now

1a. Self: In life, I value a holistic perspective [Value]. I strive to consider life from a global holistic perspective [Goal]. I believe I consider my life and varied forms of practice from a global holistic perspective [Belief]
1b. Self: In life, I value a spiritual approach to life – to experience, to learn, and to develop respect and acceptance [Value]. I strive to maintain spiritual balance within my life – to experience, to learn, and to develop respect and acceptance [Goal]. I believe we are spiritual beings, engaging in a human experience. I believe my human journey is to resolve the limitations, contradictions and inconsistencies of being human – to experience, to learn, and to develop respect and acceptance – and to engage congruently within the physical world [Belief]. [see *Note below].
1c. Self: In life, I value balance [Value].I strive to be balanced, to be a balanced, functional human being – affective, expressive and communicative – spiritually, physically and mentally [Goal]. Whilst being very busy, I believe I have balance in my life. I believe I am a balanced, functional human being – affective, expressive and communicative – spiritually, physically and mentally [Belief]
[*Note: though I became quite imbalanced over the last three months of 2016, by choosing to overlook the balance of my spiritual, physical and mental being. I am happy to report though, this balance has mostly returned by the close of the year].
1d. Self: In life, I value diversity of orientation [Value]. I am very end product/goal-orientated with actions; and I also very process-orientated with expression and reflection [Goal].Being contrast orientated, I believe I have a great opportunity in life. I believe I am target-orientated and effective and efficient in realising personal goals: I believe I do not waiver from my focus. However along the journey, I believe I am process-orientated in my expression and reflection. I believe I immerse my self in the process [Belief] [see *Note above].
1e. Self: In life, I value physical connection [Value. I strive for physical connection in everything I do [Goal]. I believe I am a physical being – a tactile being, a kinesthetic being, a sensual being [Belief] [see *Note above].
1f. Self: In life, I value an open intellect/mindfulness [Value]. I strive to approach life with an open and inquiring mind [Goal]. I believe I approach most aspects of my life with an open and inquiring mind, applying thought and mindfulness [Belief]
1g. Self: In life, I value emotion [Value]. I strive to be emotionally connected [Goal]. I believe I am an affected being [Belief][see *Note above].
1h. Self: In life, I value joy [Value]. I strive to be connected to joy and happiness [Goal]. I believe I am a joyful being [Belief][see *Note above].
1i. Self: I value a sincere and deep level of engagement with others [Value]. I aspire to engaging with others in a sincere way, and to a deep level of engagement with others [Goal]. I believe I engage with others in a sincere way, and to a deep level of engagement with others – in a genuine and congruent manner [Belief][see *Note above].
1j. Self: I value nurturing as a human quality [Value].I aspire to be a nurturing soul [Goal]. I believe I am a nurturing soul [Belief] [see *Note above].

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Year 1 Research Study Part 1b – who I know I am now as a practitioner

2a. Self & Practice: In my life I value self-reliance [Value]. I aspire to being self-reliant [Goal]. I believe I am able to be self-reliant in most aspects of my life, but choose to, or not to as I see appropriate [Belief][see *Note above].
2b. Self & Practice: I value a high standard of practice [Value]. I aspire to execute a high standard of practice [Goal]. I believe I operate at a high standard of practice in most areas of my life [Belief].
2c. Self & Practice: I value a high volume of post-training practice (10,000 hours) in order to develop a professional level of knowledge and skill in that practice [Value]. In any form of new practice I choose to learn, I set the goal on 10,000 hours of post-training practice in order to develop a professional level of knowledge and skill in that practice [Goal]. The forms of practice I have developed a professional level of knowledge and skill in, is the result of having invested 10,000 hours of post-training practice [Belief].
2d. Self & Practice: I value diversity of orientation in my practice [Value]. I am very end product/goal-orientated with actions; and I also very process-orientated with expression and reflection [Goal]. Being contrast orientated, I believe I have a great opportunity in life. I believe I am target-orientated, effective and efficient in realising goals for my practice: I believe I do not waiver from the output focus for that practice. However within practice, I believe I immerse my self in the process of practice with my expression and reflection [Belief] [see *Note above].
2e. Self & Practice: I value a complex multi-dimensional approach to practice [Value]. I aspire to execute a complex multi-dimensional approach within my practice [Goal]. I believe I execute a complex multi-dimensional approach within my practice [Belief].
2f. Self & Practice: I value spontaneity (being spontaneous = freedom for DLP) [Value]. I aspire to spontaneously – effortlessly, naturally – alter my practice as I see fit/appropriate [Goal]. I believe I operate in a spontaneous manner – effortlessly, naturally, within my practice [Belief].
2g. Self & Practice: In my life I value being prepared [Value]. I aspire to being prepared in all situations, facilitating optimum engagement and maximizing the opportunity of an optimum experience for others [Goal]. I believe I prepare thoroughly for my practice, facilitating optimum engagement and maximizing the opportunity of an optimum experience for others. I believe such preparation is an integral part of the practice process [Belief] [see *Note above].
2h Self & Practice: In my life I value appearing to be in a relaxed state [Value]. I aspire to appearing to be in a relaxed state in all situations, enabling the execution of what appears to be an effortless/natural/automatic high level of practice; in turn facilitating optimum engagement and maximizing the opportunity of an optimum experience for others [Goal]. I believe I prepare thoroughly for my practice, prior to practice, in order to be in a relaxed stated at the time of public practice (ie the performance). Being in this state in turn facilitates optimum engagement and maximizes the opportunity of an optimum experience for others. I believe such a relaxed state in public performance is a key element of the practice process [Belief] [see *Note above].
2i. Self & Practice: I value practice that provides opportunities for nurturing [Value]. I aspire to practice that provides opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Goal]. I believe I engage in practice that provides opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Belief][see *Note above].

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Year 1 Research Study Part 1c – who I know I am as a practitioner

3a. Social and Cultural contexts: I value social and cultural diversity [Value]. I strive to live across a very wide and broad range of social and cultural contexts – countries and cultures in my life [Goal]. I believe I embrace a very wide and broad range of of social and cultural contexts – countries and cultures in my life [Belief].
3b. Social and Cultural contexts: I value equal opportunity for all – irrespective of gender, race, sexual preference, impairment [Value]. I strive to provide equitable levels of service and practice for all – irrespective of gender, race, sexual preference, impairment [Goal].I believe I assist people by providing equitable levels of service and practice for all – irrespective of gender, race, sexual preference, impairment [Belief].
3c. Social and Cultural contexts: I value opportunity for all for learning and development to navigate their life  – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… (what I refer to as “community education”) [Value]. I strive to assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life –  their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community education”) [Goal]. I believe I assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community education”) [Belief].
3d. Social and Cultural contexts: I value opportunities in contexts that provide opportunities for nurturing [Value]. I aspire to practice in contexts that provides opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Goal]. I believe I engage in practice in contexts which provides opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Belief].

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Year 1 Research Study Part 1d – who I know I am as a music practitioner

4a. Music Practice: I value diversity of orientation in my practice [Value]. I strive to exercise both a goal-orientation (product), and a process-orientation (process) with my music practice [Goal].Being contrast orientated, I believe there is a great opportunity in my music practice. I believe my target-orientation allows me to effectively and efficiently realise goals for my music practice, not wavering from the output focus for that music practice. However within my music practice, I believe I immerse my self in the process of the music practice with my expression and reflection for creative benefit [Belief].
4b. Music Practice: I value social and cultural diversity of music style [Value].I strive to experience and be influenced by a very wide and broad range of diversity of music styles in my life [Goal]. I believe I am open to experience and be influenced by a very wide and broad range of diversity of music styles [Belief].
4c. Music Practice: I value the practice of music in a supportive environment or culture [Value]. I strive to practice music in a supportive culture and environment in my life [Goal]. I believe I practice music in a supportive culture and environment [Belief]
4d. Music Practice: I value the practice of music to assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community music education”) [Value]. I strive to practice music to assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community music education”) [Goal]. I believe the practice of music can assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community music education”) [Belief]. I believe I practice music to assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community music education”) [Belief].
4e. Music Practice: I value the practice of music which provide opportunities for nurturing [Value]. I aspire to practice music which provides opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Goal]. I believe I engage in the practice of music to provide opportunities to nurture (both my self and others) [Belief]. I believe I practice music in a manner that is nurturing (of both my self and others) [Belief].

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Year 1 Research Study Part 1e – who I know I am as a music practitioner

5a. Composition & Performance: I value diversity of orientation in my composition and performance practice [Value]. I strive to exercise both a goal-orientation (product), and a process-orientation (process) with my composition and performance practice [Goal]. Being contrast orientated, I believe there is a great opportunity in my composition and performance practice. I believe my target-orientation allows me to effectively and efficiently realise goals for my composition and performance practice, not wavering from the aim and objective focus for that practice. However within that practice, I believe I immerse my self in the process of the composition and performance practice with my expression and reflection for creative benefit. I believe I am in the moment during that practice [Belief].
5b. Composition & Performance: I value compositions combining a range of music and sonic textures, appropriate to the music style [Value]. I strive to create compositions integrating a range of music and sonic textures into all of my compositions and performances, appropriate to the music style [Goal]. I believe I integrate a range of music and sonic textures into all of my compositions and performances, appropriate to the music style [Belief].
5c. Composition & Performance: I value compositions combining a range of music and sonic textures, woven together in a holistic cohesive manner [Value]. I strive as a music practitioner to create and play compositions combining a range of music and sonic textures, woven together in a holistic cohesive manner [Goal]. I believe as a music practitioner, I create and play compositions combining a range of music and sonic textures, woven together in a holistic cohesive manner [Belief].
5d. Composition & Performance: I value performing the instruments and musical parts I play, in and around other instruments, integrating/gluing all of the instrumental music and sonic textures together [Value]. I strive to perform the instruments and musical parts I play, in and around other instruments, integrating/gluing all of the instrumental music and sonic textures together [Goal]. I believe I perform the instruments and musical parts I play, in and around other instruments, integrating/gluing all of the instrumental music and sonic textures together [Belief]
5e. Composition & Performance: I value composing and performing music that is nurturing of both my self and others [Value]. I aspire to compose and perform music that is nurturing of both my self and others[Goal]. I believe I compose and perform music that is nurturing of both my self and others [Belief].I believe I practice music in a manner that is nurturing of both my self and others [Belief].

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Year 2 Research Study Part 2a – who I am discovering/accepting my self to be as a practitioner

6a. Self & Professional Practice: I value diversity of orientation in my professional practice [Value].I strive to exercise both a goal-orientation (product), and a process-orientation (process) with my professional practice [Goal]. Being contrast orientated, I believe there is a great opportunity in professional practice. I believe my target-orientation allows me to effectively and efficiently realise goals for my professional practice, not wavering from the aim and objective focus for that practice. However within that professional practice, I believe I believe I am in the moment. I immerse my self in the process of that practice with my expression and reflection, for great benefit to both my self and my practice. [Belief].
6b. Self & Professional Practice: In my life I value reflection – conscious, deliberate, systematic, interrogative introspection in order to consider, critically analyse and appraise my self and my practice [Value]. I aspire to being reflective – conscious, deliberate, systematic, interrogative introspection in order to consider, critically analyse and appraise my self and my practice (family, music, education, research and management & governance) as appropriate  [Goal]. I am able to be reflective – conscious, deliberate, systematic, interrogative introspection in order to consider, critically analyse and appraise my self and my practice (family, music, education, research and management & governance) as appropriate [Belief].
6c. Self & Professional Practice: In my life I value ongoing development – constant and never-ending reflexive practice, in order to maintain proactive development of my self and my practice [Value]. I aspire to ongoing development – constant and never-ending reflexive practice, in order to maintain proactive development of my self and my practice (family, music, education, research and management & governance) as appropriate [Goal]. I believe I am committed to ongoing development – constant and never-ending reflexive practice, in order to maintain proactive development of my self and my practice (family, music, education, research and management & governance) as appropriate [Belief].
6d. Self & Professional Practice: I value varied motives of practice [Value]. I strive to practice resulting from many varied motivations [Goal]. I believe I practice as a result of:
  • Discovery (to use music practice as a medium for exploring, attempting to do something which you haven’t done previously);
  • Technically (to technically develop one’s skills);
  • Social (to connect to others);
  • Affectively (to express or connect to emotion);
  • Aesthetically (for expression or engagement in something artistic or of beauty);
  • Creatively (for action, just to do);
  • Physical (for physical expression, for exercise];
  • Commercial (for income generation purposes);
  • Educational (to demonstrate specific practice to my students, live or in preparation);
  • Cathartic (for self-development or intervention purposes. For me to connect with my emotions – to notice, to reflect, to acknowledge the emotion, and their significance, to work through that emotional experience – to deal with specific and/or significant events, and hopefully in doing so, move beyond certain emotions associated with these significant events, developing my self);
  • Performance (to maximise my performance standard, and what others get to see of me/ practice);
  • Nurturing (core to my Charter of Values is nurturing – nurturing of self and others. I demonstrate in my education & learning practice; nurturing of both others (eg when I am ‘performing’ either a} and myself in my creative practice; and nurturing of myself in my research practice) [Belief].
6e. Self & Professional Practice: In my life I value nurturing [Value]. I aspire to be nurturing being – of my self and others – across my areas of my practice (family, music, education, research, practice) as appropriate [Goal]. I believe I am a nurturing being – of my self and others – across my areas of my practice (family, music, education, research, practice) – a social carer, an encourager, a coach, a mentor, an educator, a friend…. as appropriate [Belief].

~DLP Pro Image 1.20141020

(DLP 2016)
As I developed my Research Study through Project 1 in the second year of my doctoral studies, I developed my Charter of Values and Beliefs progressively, and updated the following as of 31st December 2016.

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Year 2 Research Study Part 2b – who I am discovering/accepting my self to be as a music practitioner

7a. Self & Music Practice: As a contemporary music practitioner, I value the practice of music across all of the six (6) stages of music practice: performance, creation, pre-production, production, post-production, and distribution [Value]. As a contemporary music practitioner, I strive to practice music across all of the six (6) stages of music practice: performance, creation, pre-production, production, post-production, and distribution[Goal]. As a contemporary music practitioner, I believe I practice music across all of the six (6) stages of music practice: performance, creation, pre-production, production, post-production, and distribution [Belief].
7b. Self & Music Practice: I value music primarily for its affective, expressive and communicative qualities [Value]. I strive to perform and compose music primarily for its affective, expressive and communicative qualities [Goal]. I believe I perform and compose music primarily for its affective, expressive and communicative qualities [Belief]
7c. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of music motivated by a diversity of intentions – the majority of which are non-commercial [Value]. I strive to practice music motivated by a diversity of intentions in my life – the majority of which are non-commercial [Goal]. I believe I practice music motivated by a diversity of intentions – the majority of which are non-commercial such as:
  • Discovery (to use music practice as a medium for exploring, attempting to do something which you haven’t done previously)
  • Technically (to use music practice as a medium to practice one’s craft, and technically develop one’s craft skills)
  • Social (to use music practice as a medium for social interaction purposes, to connect to others [communicative])
  • Affectively (to use music practice as a medium to express or connect to emotion)
  • Aesthetically (to use music practice as a medium for expression or engagement in something artistic or of beauty)
  • Creatively (to use music practice as a medium for action, just to do [expressivity])
  • Physical (to use music practice as a medium for physical expression, for exercise]
  • Commercial (to use music practice as a medium for income generation purposes)
  • Educational (to demonstrate specific music practice to my students, live or in preparation)
  • Cathartic (self-development or intervention purposes. For me to connect with my emotions – to notice, to reflect, to acknowledge the emotion, and their significance, to work through that emotional experience – to deal with specific and/or significant events, and hopefully in doing so, move beyond certain emotions associated with these significant events, developing my self)
  • Performance (where my primary motive is to perform, and therefore all creation and creative development is built upon wanting to maximise my performance standard, and what others get to see of me/my art/my music practice
  • Nurturing (core to my Charter of Values is nurturing – nurturing of self and others. I demonstrate in my education & learning practice; nurturing of both others (eg when I am ‘performing’ either a} and myself in my creative practice; and nurturing of myself in my research practice) [Belief]
7d. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of listening to music on any of the three levels: holistic, associative, or critical and analytical listening [Value]. I strive to practice listening to music on any of the three levels: holistic, associative, and critical and analytical listening [Goal]. I believe I practice listening to music on all of the three levels: holistic, associative, and critical and analytical listening [Belief].
7e. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of music of a range of cultural origins [Value]. I strive to practice music across of a range of cultural origins [Goal]. I believe I practice music across a range of cultural origins [Belief]

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Year 2 Research Study Part 2c – who I am discovering/accepting myself to be as a music practitioner

8a. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of music across a range of diverse technologies [Value]. I strive to practice music across a range of diverse technologies [Goal]. I believe I practice music across a range of diverse technologies [Belief].
8b. Self & Music Practice: Intuitively, I value physical instruments that emit vibrations and resonances, of a style and size I can physically embrace [Value]. I intuitively research across a range of physical instruments to play that emit vibrations and resonances, of a style and size I can physically embrace [Goal]. I believe I intuitively search for and play a range of physical instruments that emit vibrations and resonances, of a style and size I can physically embrace [Belief].
8c. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of music in a range of diverse sites, where one site’s practice can influence and/or inform another form of practice in another site [Value]. I strive to practice music in a range of diverse sites, where one site’s practice can influence and/or inform another form of practice in another site [Goal]. I believe I practice music in a range of diverse sites, where one site’s practice such as live performance influences and informs another form of practice in another site such as studio performance; which in turn can influence and inform another form of practice such as live performance [Belief].
8d. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of music across a range of diverse holistic work practice, including compositional songs and soundtracks [Value]. I strive to practice music across a range of diverse holistic work practice, including compositional songs and soundtracks [Goal]. I believe I practice music across a range of diverse holistic work practice, including compositional songs and soundtracks [Belief].
8e. Self & Music Practice: I value the practice of music across a range of diverse (micro) workflows [Value]. I strive to practice music across a range of diverse (micro) workflows [Goal]. I believe I practice music across a range of diverse (micro) workflows [Belief].

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Year 2 Research Study Part 2d – who I am discovering/accepting my self to be as a music practitioner

9a. Composition & Performance Technology: I value a diversity of technology in the creation and layering of musical and sonic textures within the music practice of composition and performance – analogue, digital or digital virtual devices [Value]. I strive to create a diversity of technology in the creation and layering of musical and sonic textures within the music practice of composition and performance – analogue, digital or digital virtual devices [Goal]. I believe I use a diversity of technology to create and layer the musical and sonic textures within my music practice of composition and performance – analogue, digital or digital virtual devices.  I have developed a diverse range of technology to create and layer musical and sonic textures within my music practice of composition and performance – analogue, digital or digital virtual devices [Belief].
9b. Composition & Performance Technology: I value both acoustic style instruments and their timbre, and the manipulation of at-the-time generated or pre-recorded sound sources for creative purposes  [Value]. I strive as a music practitioner to integrate the initial primary focus of acoustic style instruments and their timbre, with the manipulation of at-the-time generated or pre-recorded sound sources for creative purposes [Goal].I believe as a music practitioner I attempt to integrate the initial primary focus of acoustic style instruments and their timbre, with the manipulation of at-the-time generated or pre-recorded sound sources for creative purposes [Belief]. I believe I developed my live/studio technology (my rig) to facilitate the manipulation and layering of sonic textures, and duplicate these irrespective of location – in both live and studio settings [Belief].
9c. Composition & Performance Technology: I value the manipulation and layering of sonic textures must be duplicable equally in live and studio settings. Therefore my rig must facilitate sourcing these sonic textures irrespective of site [Value]. I strive to manipulate and layer sonic textures and duplicate equally in live and studio settings. I strive to develop my live/studio technology (my rig) to facilitate sourcing these sonic textures irrespective of site [Goal]. I believe I manipulate and layer sonic textures and duplicate equally in live and studio settings. I believe I have developed my live/studio technology (my rig) to facilitate sourcing these sonic textures irrespective of site [Belief].

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Year 2 Research Study Part 2e – who I am discovering/accepting my self to be as a music practitioner

10a. Creative Practitioner: I value diversity of orientation as a creative practitioner [Value]. I strive to exercise both a goal-orientation (product), and a process-orientation (process) as a creative practitioner [Goal]. Being contrast orientated, I believe there is a great opportunity as a creative practitioner. I believe my target-orientation allows me to effectively and efficiently realise goals, not wavering from the aim and objective focus of that practice. However, I believe I am in the moment as a creative practitioner, fully immersed in the process of my creative practice [Belief].
10b. Creative Practitioner: I value music practice with origins in, and for artistic expression, over music practice solely reliant on craft expression [Value]. I strive to practice music for artistic expression, over music practice solely for craft expression [Goal]. I believe I am now practicing music for artistic expression, rather that practicing music solely for craft expression [Belief].
10c. Creative Practitioner:  I value a described music praxis – a framework that articulates the interdependent elements for consideration during the stages of one’s music practice [Value]. I strive to describe my music praxis – a framework that articulates the interdependent elements for consideration during the stages of one’s music practice [Goal]. I believe I have developed a considered music praxis – a framework that articulates the elements for consideration during the stages one’s music practice. These primary elements of my Music Practice Praxis v8i (see figure I below) are: listening, self, reflection/reflective practice, reflexive practice, motive, theme, song mood, decision to commence, music production approach, compositional approach, agreed reference track, music style, simple versus complex textures, technology, site, holistic work practice, micro workflow, aesthetic choices, time opportunity, and social network engagement [Belief].

DLP DCI Praxis v8i.20161231.P1

Figure I – Project 1 Research Study Developed Praxis v8i (Page 2016c)
10d. Creative Practitioner: I value independent self-reliant solo performers who aspired to create multi-timbral and multi-layered soundscapes in each and every performance, irrespective of motive, musical style or site [Value]. I strive to be an independent self-reliant solo performer who aspires to create multi-timbral and multi-layered soundscapes in each and every performance, irrespective of motive, musical style or site [Goal]. I believe I am an independent self-reliant solo performer who aspires to create multi-timbral and multi-layered soundscapes in each and every performance, irrespective of motive, musical style or site [Belief].

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Significant Differences between my Project 1 end Year 1 Charter of Values and Beliefs v1, and my end Year 2 Charter of Values and Beliefs v2

In addition to the two areas I have already noted – 1b and 1c – I will now note some of the significant developments between my Project 1 end Year 1 Charter of Values and Beliefs v1, and my end Year 2 Charter of Values and Beliefs v2.
I added diversity of orientation. Whilst this quality could possibly be inferred from a number of items within my Year 1 Charter of Values and Beliefs, I believe I needed to make it more explicit given it was something that I observed had significant impact on my self and my practice. In pursuing my practice across Year 2, I noted on many occasions that I  was both end product/goal-orientated, and process-orientated. These were quite often at odds with each other, and sometimes I considered them to be mutually exclusive. However, as Year 2 progressed, I realised that there were examples of my approach to practice where these two orientations sat very comfortably side by side in my orientation to practice.  I believe this dual orientation affords me a great opportunity in life. My target-orientatation allows me to be effective and efficient in realising personal goals, not wavering from my focus. However within my practice, in the act of doing and being present within practice, I believe I am process-orientated in my expression and reflection. I believe I immerse my self in the process, and this orientation provides great benefit to both my self, and my practice. Given this positive impact on my self, my practitioner self, and my practice, I therefore added paragraphs 1d, 2c, 4a, 6a and 10a.
I also added nurturing as a human quality. Whilst this was present in my original Charter of Values and Beliefs as paragraph 6d, I observed this quality was missing in other aspects of my life and practice. I therefore added it into paragraphs 1j, 2i, 3d, 4e and 5e.
The five other additions to my Charter of Values and Beliefs v2 that were more practice-based focussed were:
2b. Self & Practice: a high standard of practice;  2c. Self & Practice: a high volume of post-training practice (10,000 hours); 2e. Self & Practice: a complex multi-dimensional approach to practice; and, 4d. Music Practice: the practice of music to assist people to gain an opportunity for learning and development – helping them to navigate their life – their dreams, desires, goals, directions, wants, wishes, in order to overcome their challenges, issues, hurts… – (what I refer to as “community music education”); 7c. Self & Creative practice: creating music and sonic narratives in the styles of narrative, prose or song lyrics.

Summary

As a person new to formal academic research studies,  I have been surprised with the number of occasions that I have been confronted by a range of thoughts, feelings, observations, recollections – positives and learnings – and highlighted behavioural patterns over the course of my life, relative to my music practice. Over the past few months I realised that I did not have in fact, the clearest understanding of who I was as a creative practitioner at this moment in time.  Therefore in order to try to anchor myself, I continue to develop my Charter of Values and Beliefs to maintain a valid contemporary values statement – a charter of values for both myself and my music practice at this time. In doing this, I am able to continue to gain new levels of understanding of my self and my practice, and start to apply them reflexively to my self and practice (see figure II below).

creative-practitioner-graphic_end-project-1-20161231-p1

Figure II – Project 1 Research Study Developed Approach (Page 2016d)
Engaging in this research study has allowed me to continue to develop my self, increase my self confidence, develop clarity regarding my practice, and increase my confidence with this task at hand as a practitioner with my Research Study Project 1. In short, it has allowed me to become a more holistic and balanced practitioner – an expanded practitioner (see figure III below).

creative-practitioner-graphic_more-holistic-balanced-practitioner-20161231-p2

Figure III – Project 1 Research Study Developed Approach (Page 2016e)

Next Step

I realise that as my Research Study Project continues and I gain more insight and greater clarity about my self and my practice, this document will require even more development. It remains a dynamic document that will continue to evolve, in line with my reflections and insights of my self interests, and my practitioner self interests.
This blog series is planned to continue next month with Research Practitioner Part 15. It is intended for this blog series to continue on a regular basis as I progress through my doctoral research project.
References
DLP 2016 image courtesy of David L Page. Accessed 27th November, 2016
 Onion image courtesy of: Onion Layers Accessed 28th March, 2015
Page, David 2016a QUT KKP622 Mid-Project 1 Research Study Progress Report submission draft Accessed April 24, 2016.
Page, David 2016b Research Practitioner Part 6  Accessed 27th November, 2016
Page, David 2016c  Project 1 Research Study Developed Praxis v8i  Created 27th November, 2016
Page, David 2016d  Project 1 Research Study Developed Approach Created 27th November, 2016
Page, David 2016e  Project 1 Research Study Developed Approach Created 27th November, 2016
Page, David 2015 QUT KKP603 Project Development in the Creative Industries submission DLP DCI Project Brief  Accessed 22nd April, 2016.
Research 2016 image courtesy of: Research Accessed 28th January 2016
Self Reflection 2016 image courtesy of: Self-reflection-for-personal-growth  Accessed 18th March, 2016.
– ©David L Page 27/11/2016
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.
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Microphones Part 13 – Other

This blog is a continuation of a series. See here for the previous blog.

medium-diaphragm-condenser-microphones

(AE Project Studio 2015)

Current stock

My current studio and live microphone stocks a modest range of dynamic microphones, dynamic ribbons, condensers, tubes and contact microphones. The range of microphones include: Shure 57s, 58s, Beta52As & SM7Bs; Electro Voice RE20s; Sennheiser e935s, e945s, e906s & MD441Us; MXL 550s & 551s; Rode NT-USBs, NT1s, NT3s, NT5s, NTRs, NT4s & NTKs; Audio Technica AT2020; AKG C414XLIIs, P420s & CGN523Es; Mojave MA101FETs, MA1000; Neumann TLM193, OPR87C, OPR87I & OPR84s; Royer 121s; RCA77s; DPA 4099s;  IK reference mic; a Zoom H6 XY and MS mic; Sony lapel mics; and a range of contact mics. This stock allows for versatility in most recording scenarios that have been presented to me; of course coupled with great instruments, amplifiers,outboard processing hardware, interfaces, consoles, and of course artists. But sometimes, in certain scenarios, even these are not enough.

Current Research Study Project

In my current doctoral research study project, I have designed a composition requiring me to source sonic samples of significant aspects of my life. Water is one of the most significant and influential elements in my life and my life partner’s lifestyle [see blog or Media Use Part 1], I felt a need to be able to record water samples across a range of contexts which I have experienced. The ocean, rain, waterfalls, swimming pools, and domestic water use. However, this needed to occur without causing damage to my current range of microphones. Ready and portable – armed with my Zoom H6 -my research project would not be complete without the range of real water samples – out in the environment. However, I also felt a need to record sonic samples of water from a submersed perspective. Of my current stock of microphones, there were none that allowed me to record in a submersed scenario, without needing a further layer between the microphone and the element of water, such as by using plastic bags or tubs, duct tape and silicon. I therefore felt an alternative solution was needed.

zoom-h6-01

Hydrophone H2a-XLR

I researched my options, exploring what other audio engineers have used to gather some water-based samples. I finally decided to purchase a fully submersible microphone, and  I now received what will be the latest microphone to add to my stock of studio and live microphones: an Aquarian Audio Products Hydrophone H2a-XLR microphone.
A hydrophone microphone is designed to be immersed in water – natural or salt water – multiple times without degrading from excessive water damage or corrosion.
H2aXLR_9m.P3.jpg
The Aquarian Audio hydrophone microphone is quite compact, measuring just 25mm wide, but 46 mm long. It weighs just 105 grams.
h2axlr_9m-p2
It is a condenser microphone, requiring 48v power in order to charge the electro-static transduction process. As such it is extremely sensitive, with minimal extraneous noise. “The hydrophone sensor is cable of picking up sounds from below 20Hz to above 100KHz” (Aquarian Audio Products 2016). Designed for deep water where maximum microphone bandwidth can be achieved,  the Aquarian Audio Hydrophone apparently boasts an operating depth of up to 80 metres. However, the model I purchased came with a 9 metre cable, a length I thought was more than adequate for the sample events I am looking for.
H2aXLR_9m.P1.jpg

Using a Hydrophone – Context

Having just received the microphone, I am still yet to venture out into a deep water environment where I can test the microphone to its full capacity. However, I was keen to immediately test the microphone to get an idea of how sensitive it was going to be, how accurate it was going to potentially be in capturing the original sound source, and how much noise it may or may not inherently have. Using my Zoom H6 with this hydrophone to gather a number of preliminary samples, I considered the options I had immediately around me. I chose the 60,000 litre salt water fibreglass swimming pool found in our front garden as my first test environment. A place where my partner and I have spent considerable hours over the past two decades, it is surely a significant part of our lives, and therefore somewhere I am going to need to gather sample events for my composition. In saying that, embarking on this test I acknowledged there would be some limitations of using this test environment to trial the functionality of this condenser microphone. Namely, the structure of the pool – the pool is 4 metres wide, 9.5 metres long  and 1.9 metre deep (reducing to about 1.4 metres in the shallow end) and made of a fibreglass shell with the sides and bottom curved into one continuous surface. Due to this particular environment, the hydrophone microphone would likely display a narrower bandwidth than what it would optimally have in deeper waters; and the captured sound source was likely to include the original sound source and a number of reflections off the hard surfaces of this domestic swimming pool.  Irrespective, as I was going to need samples of this environment eventually, I considered it a useful initial test environment.

Using a Hydrophone – Part 1

The first 5 sample events I believe demonstrate the sensitivity this condenser microphone has in underwater situations. I was surprised how sensitive the microphone was, despite the large amount of water residing between/separating the subject and the microphone capsule during these recordings. As indicated above regarding the reflections, the captured sample events demonstrates a cacophony of sonic textures resulting from a fusion of both the intended sound source and its’ multiple reflections.
Note also the frequency range of each sample event relative to the micopphones’ depth and proximity to either the surface, the bottom, or the sides of the swimming pool. I have been reminded that in a shallower water environment: there is likely to be less fully developed low frequencies due to the shorter distance between any surfaces. Additionally, in calm water conditions the sound waves under the surface are likely to rebound back off a flat water surface, phase cancelling the original signal below it. This phenomena of a varying frequency range is particularly noticeable in Using a Hydrophone – Part 2 sample events 7 and 8 when the condenser microphone capsule is being bounced up and down at variable depths under the surface, and then breaches the surface of the water. Listen and compare the frequency range and the sonic texture of each sample event as the condenser capsule moves through the water.

Sample Event 1  (click to access audio)

In the first sample, the hydrophone was submerged in the swimming pool to a depth of about 1.5 metres. The Zoom H6 track 3 gain level was set to 6 (of 10). My friend (the subject) was in the pool and approximately 2 metres away from the hydrophone, facing it and blowing bubbles under water in the direction of the microphone. The reverberations off the nearby pool surfaces are quite noticeable from about 1/3 third into the sample event, providing a minor delay of the original signal until the end of the sample event.

Sample Event 2 (click to access audio)

In the second sample, the hydrophone was maintained in the swimming pool at a depth of about 1.5 metres. The Zoom H6 track 3 gain level was set to 7 (of 10). The subject was in the pool and approximately 3 metres away from the hydrophone, facing it and blowing bubbles. The overall levels are softer in this second sample event while she was mimicking what she had done previously – with the exception of when the hydrophone capsule got knocked by something (tall volume spike midway) – despite the gain level being increased marginally. See image i below. The reverberations off the nearby pool surfaces are quite noticeable from about one third into the sample event, providing a minor delay of the original signal until the end of the sample event for the second third, but then decays and releases back to mainly the original signal in the final third of the sample event.  As a result of the decaying signal, the amplitude reduces. With the return to the original signal in the final third, there is greater clarity of the signal.
pts-sample-event-1-2-comparison-20161117Image I – Pro Tools 12 Sample event 1 (top) and Sample Event 2 (bottom)

Sample Event 3  (click to access audio)

In the third sample event, the hydrophone was submerged in the swimming pool to a depth of about 1.5 metres. The Zoom H6 track 3 gain level was maintained at 7 (of 10). The subject was in the pool and approximately 3 metres away from the hydrophone, facing it and trying to talk underwater.  I note that despite her being farther away from the hydrophone capsule than she was in the first sample event, as she was trying to talk loudly under water toward the microphone capsule, the audio is louder than both sample events 1 and 2. As you can see in image ii below, the overall mass of the wav file is exponentially greater in this third event than both the previous two sample events, with the subject’s speaking voice producing far greater mass and density than she did when blowing bubbles underwater. This mass and density represents increases in sound pressure levels, and reverberant signals, resulting in a cacophony of sonic textures.  Had I included a longer sample, you would observe, as per the sample event 2, at a certain point the signal decays and releases back to mainly the original signal, with reduce amplitude, but greater clarity.
PTs Sample Event 1 2 3 Comparison.20161117.png
Image II – Pro Tools 12 Sample event 1 (top), Sample Event 2 (middle, Sample Event 3 (bottom)

Sample Event 4  (click to access audio)

In the fourth sample event, the hydrophone was submerged in the swimming pool to a depth of about 1.5 metres. The Zoom H6 track 3 gain level was maintained at 5 (of 10). The subject is in the pool and approximately 0.5 metres away from the hydrophone, facing it and blowing bubbles. Sonically, this fourth sample event demonstrates a cacophony of sonic textures, resulting from excessive sound pressure levels due to the close proximity of the transducer relative to the sound source, and the accompanying  reverberant signals from the multiple surfaces of the pool.  The inherent distortion results from excessive sound pressure levels, with an over-gained signal. For non-audiophiles: note the clean flat line along the top of the wav form indicating a form of dynamic limiting. Given that no dynamic processing was used to achieve this limiting of the audio signal, the limiting effect indicates acceptable gain levels for the equipment were exceeded, resulting in what is referred to as digital (signal) clipping. See image iii below (top wav form).

PTs Sample Event 4 + 5 Comparison.20161117.png

Image III – Pro Tools 12 Sample event 4 (top) and Sample Event 5 (bottom)

Sample Event 5  (click to access audio)

In the fifth sample event, the hydrophone was maintained at a depth of about 1.5 metres. The Zoom H6 track 3 gain level is reduced to 5 (of 10). The subject was in the pool and approximately 0.5 metres away from the hydrophone, facing it and trying to talk underwater. As you can see in image iii above (bottom wav form), the overall mass of the wav file is exponentially greater in this fifth event than the previous sample events, with the subject’s speaking voice producing far greater sound pressure levels than she did when blowing bubbles underwater. Sonically, this fifth sample event is heavily distorted due to the excessive sound pressure levels due to the close proximity of the transducer relative to the sound source. The digital recording is therefore clipped given the amplitude far exceeded the specified gain levels of the equipment. For non-audiophiles: in this example the cleaner flatter line along the top of the wav form – relative to the previous example – indicating extreme limiting of the audio signal. Again, as no dynamic processing was used – it similarly indicates excessive sound pressure levels at unacceptable gain levels for the equipment, resulting in severe digital (signal) clipping across almost the entire length of the audio wav file.  It is also worth noting the very thin sound of this sample event as a result of the absence of low frequencies in the shallow depths; and yet as per sample event 4, there is a cacophony of sonic textures given the multiple reverberant signals arriving from the numerous surfaces of the pool.

Using a Hydrophone Part 2

In the following examples, I gathered a number of sample events using the hydrophone closer to the surface of the water line.  I hope the sample events further show how sensitive the hydrophone microphone is, effectively capturing sonic qualities of very subtle movements.

Sample Event 6  (click to access audio)

In the sixth sample event, the Zoom H6 track 3 gain level was set at 6 (of 10). The hydrophone was being dragged along the surface of the swimming pool at a relatively slow walking pace. The sound of rushing of water is the wake of water that the small condenser capsule (25mm wide, but 46 mm long, weighing 105 grams.) is creating and capturing as it breaches the surface of the water. I think you will agree that this confirms both the sensitivity and low noise levels of this particular microphone. The deeper frequency you hear (boomy quality) in the audio file is when the transduction surface of the microphone capsule is re-submersed  under the surface of the water.

Sample Event 6wp (click to access audio)

Sample event 6wp indicates that it is the same sample as sample event 6, but with post-production audio processing added. In the studio – following recording the sample – I chose to add two (2) reverb processing devices – a Eventide and a Lexicon reverb – to the initial audio file. While doing this, and listening to the altered sonic textures of the audio, I am imagining the many applications that I could use such an effect in my sonic compositions and sound design.

Sample Event 7 (click to access audio)

The seventh sample event is a similar execution as sample event 6, with the hydrophone being dragged along the swimming pool at a relatively slow walking pace, but being bounced in and out of the water in an approximately 30 centimetre arc.  The popping and gurgling sounds are occurring as the capsule breaches the surface of the water (popping), then followed by the re-submersion (gurgling). It is a similar but more exaggerated version of sample event 6, with the sample event’s frequency varying dependent on where the condenser microphone capsule is relative to the water: being just under the surface, at depth (only about 30 cms in this example), breaching the surface, or above the surface of the water.

Sample Event 8 (click to access audio)

The eighth sample event is a similar execution as sample event 7, with the Zoom H6 track 3 gain level remaining at 6 (of 10). The hydrophone was being dragged along the surface of the swimming pool at a relatively slow walking pace, but being bounced in and out of the water over a much larger arc – approximately 1.5 metres.   This is a more exaggerated version of sample event 7, with the popping and gurgling sounds associated with the breaching and re-submersion are relatively deeper in tone due to the greater depth, speed and height the capsule was dropped from, back into and under the water.  Sonically, you may hear what sounds like wind noise in this audio sample event. I noted at the time that this was due in combination to both the faster movement of the capsule above the surface of the water after breaching; but also partially due to the wind in our local area picking up nearing the end of the test. You will also note that near the end of the sample event you can hear a voice – talking, describing my actions. This voice was captured by the microphone capsule after it had breached the surface of the water, with the speaker’s mouth about 2 metres away.

Sample Event 9 (click to access audio)

The ninth and last sample event had the hydrophone submerged in the swimming pool to a depth of about 1.5 metres held stationary. The Zoom H6 track 3 gain level remained at 6 (of 10). The subject was approximately 2 metres away from the hydrophone drop point, swimming up and down the pool in freestyle form. The low frequency plop occurred every time the subject kicked her feet, with training flippers on.  The bass frequency was pronounced, reverberating off the surfaces of the  pool, producing a sound somewhat similar to a deep tom sonic boom after the skin had been struck. And yet, the hydrophone microphone still clearly captured what sounds to be running water – the sound of the subject’s hand and arms entering and breaching the surface of the water with each and every stroke. Again, I am imagining the many applications that I could apply some processing to this sample event, and use such an effect in my sonic compositions and sound design.

Summary

The Aquarian Audio Products Hydrophone H2a-XLR microphone is an extremely sensitive fully submersible condenser microphone, with minimal extraneous noise. It is well designed and constructed to be impact resistant, using sturdy materials. Whilst it is designed to be submersed in a far greater depth than I have tested to date, I believe I have made a good purchase with this hydrophone, something that will complement my current stock of studio and live microphones. I believe this microphone will allow me even greater versatility in a range of recording scenarios that I can foresee me being presented. I daresay I will probably now go searching further afield, exploring less predictable outdoor terrain, and feeling the need to be less mindful than I usually would taking my more expensive studio microphones. I am looking forward to progressing my sonic compositions and sound designs using water samples across the range of contexts which I have experienced in my life – the ocean – including boating, body surfing, snorkelling and scuba diving – rivers,  waterfalls, natural pools, and domestic water use – in order to capture specific sample events that represent significant events and memories. I look forward to this next chapter in my creative practice.
It is intended for this series of microphone-related blogs to continue.
References
AE Project Studio Microphone Case image courtesy of: DLP Pinterest site  Accessed 28th August, 2015
Aquarian Audio Products. 2016a.  H2a-XLR Hyrophone Users Guide http://www.aquarianaudio.com   Accessed 17th November 2016
Aquarian Audio Products. 2016b. http://www.aquarianaudio.com  Accessed 15th November 2016
Hydrophone images courtesy of: Aquarian Audio Products  Accessed 16th November 2016
Page, David. L 2016. Soundcloud.  DLP Soundcloud  Accessed 17th November 2016
Pro Tools 12 Sample Event Images courtesy of: David L Page  Accessed 16th November 2016
Zoom H6 image courtesy of: Sound on Sound  Accessed 16th November 2016
– ©David L Page 17/11/2016
Copyright: No aspect of the content of this blog or blog site is to be reprinted or used within any practice without strict permission directly from David L Page.

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